Islington House, N1

Road in/near Islington

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(51.53729 -0.10263, 51.537 -0.102) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · Islington · N1 ·
July
25
2019

A street within the N1 postcode





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

Reply
Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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Comment
Carol   
Added: 7 May 2021 18:44 GMT   

Nan
My nan lily,her sister Elizabeth and their parents Elizabeth and William lived here in1911

Reply
Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Born here
Vanessa Whitehouse   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 22:48 GMT   

Born here
My dad 1929 John George Hall

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
Lived here
David James Bloomfield   
Added: 13 Jul 2021 11:54 GMT   

Hurstway Street, W10
Jimmy Bloomfield who played for Arsenal in the 1950s was brought up on this street. He was a QPR supporter as a child, as many locals would be at the time, as a teen he was rejected by them as being too small. They’d made a mistake

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Comment
Added: 6 Jul 2021 05:38 GMT   

Wren Road in the 1950s and 60s
Living in Grove Lane I knew Wren Road; my grandfather’s bank, Lloyds, was on the corner; the Scout District had their office in the Congregational Church and the entrance to the back of the Police station with the stables and horses was off it. Now very changed - smile.

Reply

fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

Reply
Lived here
Kim Johnson   
Added: 24 Jun 2021 19:17 GMT   

Limehouse Causeway (1908)
My great grandparents were the first to live in 15 Tomlins Terrace, then my grandparents and parents after marriage. I spent the first two years of my life there. My nan and her family lived at number 13 Tomlins Terrace. My maternal grandmother lived in Maroon house, Blount Street with my uncle. Nan, my mum and her brothers were bombed out three times during the war.

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Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Collins’ Music Hall Collins’ Music Hall was a notable Islington venue.
Islington Islington grew as a sprawling Middlesex village along the line of the Great North Road, and has provided the name of the modern borough.
White Conduit Fields White Conduit Fields in Islington was an early venue for cricket and several major matches are known to have been played there in the 18th century.

NEARBY STREETS
Albion Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Allingham Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Allingham Street, N1 Allingham Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Almeida Street, N1 Almeida Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Anderson Square, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Ann Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Aztec Row, N1 Aztec Row is part of Berners Street, Islington.
Barford Street, N1 Barford Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Barnsbury Street, N1 Barnsbury Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Barnston Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Batchelor Street, N1 Batchelor Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Battishill Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Bentham Court, N1 Bentham Court is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Berners Road, N1 Berners Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Bishop Street, N1 Bishop Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Bouton Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Brampton House, N1 Residential block
Brayfield Terrace, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Bridel Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Britannia Row, N1 Britannia Row is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Britannia Wharf, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Bromfield Street, N1 Bromfield Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Burgh Street, N1 This is a street in the N1 postcode area
Business Design Centre, N1 The Business Design Centre is a Grade II listed building located between Upper Street and Liverpool Road
Camden Passage, N1 Camden Passage was built as Cumberland Row in 1767.
Camden Street, N1 Camden Street once laid at the northern end of Camden Passage.
Camden Walk, N1 Camden Walk is one of the streets of the N1 postal area.
Canalside Square, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Canon Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Canonbury Villas, N1 Canonbury Villas is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Chantry Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Chapel Market, N1 Chapel Market is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Chapel Place, N1 Chapel Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Charles Street, N1 Charles Street in Islington disappeared under the Hilton hotel.
Charlton Place, N1 Charlton Place runs east from Upper Street.
Cloudesley Place, N1 Cloudesley Place is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cloudesley Road, N1 Cloudesley Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cloudesley Square, N1 Cloudesley Square is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cloudesley Street, N1 Cloudesley Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Colebrook Row, N1 Colebrooke Row is a street of late 18th and early 19th century terraced houses.
Colebrooke Place, N1 Colebrooke Place is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Collins Yard, N1 Collins Yard is so-named as it ran alongside the Collins’ Music Hall giving access to the rear of the hall.
Copford Walk, N1 Copford Walk is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cross Street, N1 Cross Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cruden Street, N1 Cruden Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Dagmar Passage, N1 Dagmar Passage is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Dagmar Terrace, N1 Dagmar Terrace is a road in the N1 postcode area
Dame Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Danbury Road, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Danbury Street, N1 Danbury Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Denmark Grove, N1 Denmark Grove is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Devonia Road, N1 Devonia Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Dewey Road, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Dibden Street, N1 Dibden Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Dignum Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Doves Yard, N1 Doves Yard is a road in the N1 postcode area
Dowrey Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Draper Place, N1 Draper Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Duncan Street, N1 Duncan Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Elder Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Elystan Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Epstein Court 27a Road, N1 Epstein Court, within the N1 postcode
Essex Road, N1 Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, had a country house here in the sixteenth century where he often entertained Queen Elizabeth I.
Esther Anne Place, N1 Esther Anne Place is a location in London.
Fairstead Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Florence Street, N1 Florence Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Fowler Road, N1 Fowler Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Frome Street, N1 Frome Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Gaskin Street, N1 Gaskin Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Gerrard Road, N1 Gerrard Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Gibson Square, N1 Gibson Square is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Gissing Walk, N1 Gissing Walk is a road in the N1 postcode area
Grantbridge Street, N1 Grantbridge Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Greenman Street, N1 Greenman Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Halton Cross Street, N1 Halton Cross Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Halton Road, N1 Halton Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Haven Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Hawes Street, N1 Hawes Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Hedingham Close, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Henley Heights 351e, N1 Henley Heights 351e is a location in London.
Holland Passage, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Horse Yard, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Islington Green, N1 Islington Green is both a small green and a series of roads which surround it.
John’s Place, N1 John’s Place lead through an archway to Charles Street.
Lambs Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Laundry Lane, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Liverpool Road, N1 Liverpool Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Lofting Road, N1 Lofting Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Lonsdale Place, N1 Lonsdale Place is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Lonsdale Square, N1 Lonsdale Square was built between 1838 and 1845, and was designed in Gothic Revival style by R. C. Carpenter.
Malvern Terrace, N1 Malvern Terrace is a road in the N1 postcode area
Maryland Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Melville Place, N1 Melville Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Milner Place, N1 Milner Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Milner Square, N1 Thomas Milner (1806-84) was a politician and a friend of Benjamin Disraeli and Charles Dickens
Moon Street, N1 Moon Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Morland Mews, N1 Morland Mews is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Napier Terrace, N1 Napier Terrace is a road in the N1 postcode area
Noble Yard, N1 Noble Yard is a yard lying off Charlton Place.
North West Road, N1 North West Road is a road in the E9 postcode area
Old Royal Free Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Old Royal Free Square, N1 Old Royal Free Square is a road in the N1 postcode area
Packington Square, N1 Packington Square is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Packington Street, N1 Packington Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Parkfield Street, N1 Parkfield Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Peabody Square, N1 Peabody Square is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Peabody Yard, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Peldon Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Peter’s Street Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Pied Bull Yd, N1 This is a street in the N1 postcode area
Pierrepoint Arcade, N1 Pierrepoint Arcade is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Pierrepoint Row, N1 Pierrepoint Row is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Pierrepont Arcade, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Pierrepont Row, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Pleasant Place, N1 Pleasant Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Popham Road, N1 Popham Road is a street in London
Popham Street, N1 Popham Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Prebend Street, N1 Prebend Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Price House, N1 Residential block
Provence Street, N1 Provence Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Providence Court, N1 Providence Court is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Providence Place, N1P Providence Place lies beside the Screen On The Green.
Queens Head Street, N1 Queens Head Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Raleigh Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Raleigh Street, N1 Raleigh Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Rector Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Rheidol Mews, N1 Rheidol Mews is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Rheidol Terrace, N1 Rheidol Terrace is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Ritchie Street, N1 Ritchie Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
River Place Health Centre, N1 River Place Health Centre is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
River Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Sebbon Street, N1 Sebbon Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Shalford Court, N1 Shalford Court is a road in the N1 postcode area
Shelley Place, N1 Shelley Place is a location in London.
Shillingford Street, N1 Shillingford Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Southwood Smith Street, N1 Southwood Smith Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
St Albans Place, N1 St Albans Place was home to a famous Islington strong man.
St Peter’s Street, N1 This is a street in the N1 postcode area
St. Mary’s Path, N1 St. Mary’s Path is a road in the N1 postcode area
Stonefield Street, N1 Stonefield Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Studd Street, N1 This is a street in the N1 postcode area
Terling Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Terretts Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
The Mall, N1 The Mall is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
The Precinct, N1 The Precinct is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Theberton Street, N1 Theberton Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Thornhill Road, N1 Thornhill Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Tibberton Square, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Tibberton Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Tolpuddle Street, N1 Tolpuddle Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Tressel Close, N1 Tressel Close is a road in the N1 postcode area
Tressell Close, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Union Square, N1 Union Square is a road in the N1 postcode area
Upper Dengie Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Upper Street, N1 Upper Street begins at the junction of Pentonville Road and City Road, runs northwards past Angel, splits at Islington Green, ending at Highbury Corner.
Wakelin House, N1 Residential block
Walters House Road, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Water Tower Place, N1 Water Tower Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Waterloo Gardens, N1 Waterloo Gardens is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Waterloo Terrace, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
White Conduit Street, N1 White Conduit Street was laid out and built up with houses and tenements from the mid-1790s.
White Horse Yard, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Wicks Place, N1 Wicks Place is a location in London.
William Congreve Mews, N1 William Congreve Mews is a road in the N1 postcode area
Willow Walk, N1 Willow Walk is a small Islington side street.
Windsor Street, N1 Windsor Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Wontner Close, N1 A street within the N1 postcode

NEARBY PUBS
Almeida Theatre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bar Prague This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Camden Head The Camden Head is a grade II listed building with a circular bar, etched glass windows and original mirrors.
Central Station This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Cote Cote is a licenced premise on Islington Green.
DogEatDog This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Duke Of Cambridge Organic Pub This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Earl Of Essex This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Fox on the Green The Fox on the Green is one of Islington’s oldest pubs.
Hoxley and Porter This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
John Salt This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Kings Head This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lucky Voice This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
New Rose This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Pig & Butcher This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Radicals & Victuallers This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Steam Passage This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Tap Room This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Albion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Angelic This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Bull This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Crown This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Drapers Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hop and Berry This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The London Cocktail Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Nag’s Head This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Regent This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Wenlock & Essex This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Islington

Islington grew as a sprawling Middlesex village along the line of the Great North Road, and has provided the name of the modern borough.

Some roads on the edge of the area, including Essex Road, were known as streets by the medieval period, possibly indicating a Roman origin, but little physical evidence remains. What is known is that the Great North Road from Aldersgate came into use in the 14th century, connecting with a new turnpike up Highgate Hill. This was along the line of modern Upper Street, with a toll gate at The Angel defining the extent of the village. The Back Road - modern Liverpool Road - was primarily a drovers’ road where cattle would be rested before the final leg of their journey to Smithfield. Pens and sheds were erected along this road to accommodate the animals.

The first recorded church, St Mary’s, was erected in the twelfth century and was replaced in the fifteenth century. Islington lay on the estates of the Bishop of London and the Dean and Chapter of St Pauls. There were substantial medieval moated manor houses in the area, principally at Canonbury and Highbury. In 1548, there were 440 communicants listed and the rural atmosphere, with access to the City and Westminster, made it a popular residence for the rich and eminent. The local inns, however, harboured many fugitives and recusants.

In the 17th and 18th centuries the availability of water made Islington a good place for growing vegetables to feed London. The manor became a popular excursion destination for Londoners, attracted to the area by its rural feel. Many public houses were therefore built to serve the needs of both the excursionists and travellers on the turnpike. By 1716, there were 56 ale-house keepers in Upper Street, also offering pleasure and tea gardens, and activities such as archery, skittle alleys and bowling. By the 18th century, music and dancing were offered, together with billiards, firework displays and balloon ascents. The King’s Head Tavern, now a Victorian building with a theatre, has remained on the same site, opposite the parish church, since 1543. The founder of the theatre, Dan Crawford, who died in 2005, disagreed with the introduction of decimal coinage. For twenty-plus years after decimalisation (on 15 February 1971), the bar continued to show prices and charge for drinks in ’old money’.

By the 19th century many music halls and theatres were established around Islington Green. One such was Collins’ Music Hall, the remains of which are now partly incorporated into a bookshop. The remainder of the Hall has been redeveloped into a new theatre, with its entrance at the bottom of Essex Road. It stood on the site of the Landsdowne Tavern, where the landlord had built an entertainment room for customers who wanted to sing (and later for professional entertainers). It was founded in 1862 by Samuel Thomas Collins Vagg and by 1897 had become a 1800-seat theatre with 10 bars. The theatre suffered damage in a fire in 1958 and has not reopened.

The Islington Literary and Scientific Society was established in 1833 and first met in Mr Edgeworth’s Academy on Upper Street. Its goal was to spread knowledge through lectures, discussions, and experiments - politics and theology being forbidden. A building, the Literary and Scientific Institution, was erected in 1837 in Wellington (later Almeida) Street, designed by Roumieu and Gough in a stuccoed Grecian style. It included a library (containing 3,300 volumes in 1839), reading room, museum, laboratory, and lecture theatre seating 500.

The Royal Agricultural Hall was built in 1862 on the Liverpool Road site of William Dixon’s Cattle Layers. It was built for the annual Smithfield Show in December of that year but was popular for other purposes, including recitals and the Royal Tournament. It was the primary exhibition site for London until the 20th century and the largest building of its kind, holding up to 50,000 people. It was requisitioned for use by the Mount Pleasant sorting office during World War II and never re-opened. The main hall has now been incorporated into the Business Design Centre.

The aerial bombing of World War II caused much damage to Islington’s housing stock, with 3,200 dwellings destroyed. Before the war a number of 1930s council housing blocks had been added to the stock. After the war, partly as a result of bomb site redevelopment, the council housing boom got into its stride, reaching its peak in the 1960s: several extensive estates were constructed, by both the Metropolitan Borough of Islington and the London County Council. Clearance of the worst terraced housing was undertaken, but Islington continued to be very densely populated, with a high level of overcrowding. The district has many council blocks, and the local authority has begun to replace some of them.

From the 1960s, the remaining Georgian terraces were rediscovered by middle-class families. Many of the houses were rehabilitated, and the area became newly fashionable. This displacement of the poor by the aspirational has become known as gentrification. Among the new residents were a number of figures who became central in the New Labour movement, including Tony Blair before his victory in the 1997 general election. According to The Guardian in 2006, "Islington is widely regarded as the spiritual home of Britain’s left-wing intelligentsia." The Granita Pact between Gordon Brown and Tony Blair is said to have been made at a now defunct restaurant on Upper Street.

The completion of the Victoria line and redevelopment of Angel tube station created the conditions for developers to renovate many of the early Victorian and Georgian townhouses. They also built new developments. Islington remains a district with diverse inhabitants, with its private houses and apartments not far from social housing in immediately neighbouring wards such as Finsbury and Clerkenwell to the south, Bloomsbury and King’s Cross to the west, and Highbury to the north west, and also the Hackney districts of De Beauvoir and Old Street to the north east.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Highbury Corner
TUM image id: 1489497654
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Angel, Islington (c.1890)
TUM image id: 1557162442
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Risinghill Street, N1
TUM image id: 1467032267
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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The exterior of the Agricultural Hall in Islington (1861).
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The third Grand Theatre, Islington (1903). This was built on the site of the former Philharmonic Hall and two previous Grand Theatres
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Islington Horse and Cattle market at the turn of the twentieth century.
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A line of children hold hands as they walk along the middle of White Conduit Street towards the junction with Chapel Market in Islington.
Credit: John Gay/Historic England
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The Grand Theatre, Islington High Street (1903)
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The Angel, Islington (c.1890)
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The Camden Head, Islington This is a glorious old gin palace-style pub behind Upper Street, in existence since the 18th century.
Credit: Flickr/Ewan Munro
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The Royal Agricultural Hall, Islington (1861). View from Liverpool Road.
Credit: Wiki Commons
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Collins Theatre of Varieties (Collins’ Music Hall) existed in Islington between 1861 and 1958. Old-time ’greats’ who performed there were numerous: Charles Chaplin, Fred Karno, Kate Carney, Gus Elen, Sir George Robey, Marie Lloyd, Albert Chevalier, Nellie Wallace, Sir Harry Lauder, ’Wee’ Georgie Wood and more.
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Islington Green (1905). That is Upper Street, leading to Highbury Corner. To the right of the green but just out of the picture would be Essex Road (formerly Lower Road)
Old London postcard
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