Priory Green Estate, N1

Road in/near Islington

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  ·  MAPS  ·  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.53337 -0.11695, 51.533 -0.116) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · Islington · N1 ·
August
3
2019

A street within the N1 postcode





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

Reply
Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

Reply
Comment
Carol   
Added: 7 May 2021 18:44 GMT   

Nan
My nan lily,her sister Elizabeth and their parents Elizabeth and William lived here in1911

Reply
Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

Reply

Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

Reply
Comment
Lewis   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 20:48 GMT   

Ploy
Allotment

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

Reply
Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
The ’Royal Blue’ horse omnibus outside 5 Euston Road The bus carries route information and an advert for Selfridge's. The shops behind, including Boots the Chemist, Stewart & Wright's Cocoa Rooms and the Northumberland Hotel, are covered in advertisements.
White Conduit Fields White Conduit Fields in Islington was an early venue for cricket and several major matches are known to have been played there in the 18th century.

NEARBY STREETS
Adrian House, N1 Residential block
Affleck Street, N1 Affleck Street was built by a Mr A. Attneave in 1884.
Albion Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Albion Yard, N1 Albion Yard lies off of Balfe Street.
All Saints Street, N1 All Saints Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Balfe Street, N1 Balfe Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Barnsbury Road, N1 Barnsbury Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Baron Street, N1 Baron Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Berners House, N1 Residential block
Birkenhead Street, WC1H Birkenhead Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Boadicea Street, N1 Boadicea Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Bravingtons Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Bridge Wharf, N1 Bridge Wharf is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Britannia Street, WC1X Britannia Street, King’s Cross, dates from the 1770s.
Bryan Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Caledonia Street, N1 Caledonia Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Caledonian Road, N1 Caledonian Road runs north from King’s Cross.
Calshot Street, N1 Calshot Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Carnegie Street, N1 Carnegie Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Chalbury Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Chapel Market, N1 Chapel Market is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Charlotte Terrace, N1 Charlotte Terrace is a road in the N1 postcode area
Claremont Square, N1 Claremont Square is a square and reservoir on Pentonville Road.
Claremont Street, EC1R A street within the N1 postcode
Claremount Square, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Cloudesley Road, N1 Cloudesley Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Collier Street, N1 Collier Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Copenhagen Street, N1 Copenhagen Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Crestfield Street, NW1 Crestfield Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Crinan Street, N1 Crinan Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cruikshank Street, WC1X Cruikshank Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Cumming Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Cynthia Street, N1 Cynthia Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Delhi Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Denmark Grove, N1 Denmark Grove is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Derby Lodge, WC1X Derby Lodge is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Dewey Road, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Dignum Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Donegal Street, N1 Donegal Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Doves Yard, N1 Doves Yard is a road in the N1 postcode area
Eckford Street, N1 Eckford Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Edward Square, N1 Edward Square is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Elystan Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Euston Road, N1 The easternmost section of the Euston Road lies in the N1 postcode and runs along the facade of Kings Cross Station.
Everilda Street, N1 Everilda Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Ewen House, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Field Street, WC1X Field Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Fife Terrace, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Fisher House, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Gatti’s Wharf, N1 Gatti’s Wharf is a road in the N1 postcode area
Godson Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Granary Building, N1C Granary Building is a location in London.
Granary Square, N1C A street within the N1C postcode
Great Percy Street, WC1X Great Percy Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Half Moon Crescent, N1 Half Moon Crescent is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Handyside Street, N1C Handyside Street is a road in the N1C postcode area
Handyside Street, N1C Handyside Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Hermes Street, N1 Hermes Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Hill House Apartments, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Holford Mews, WC1X Holford Mews is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Holford Street, WC1X Holford Street is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Holford Yard, WC1X Holford Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Inglebert Street, EC1R Inglebert Street is a road in the EC1R postcode area
Jays Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Jocelin House, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Julius Nyerere Close, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Keystone Crescent, N1 Keystone Crescent is a road in the N1 postcode area
Killick Street, N1 Killick Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
King’s Boulevard, N1C King’s Boulevard is a road in the N1C postcode area
King’s Cross Square, N1C King’s Cross Square is a road in the N1C postcode area
Kings Cross Bridge, N1 Kings Cross Bridge is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Lavina Grove, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Leeke Street, WC1X Leeke Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Leirum Street, N1 Leirum Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Lorenzo Street, N1 Lorenzo Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Lorenzo Street, N1 Lorenzo Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Maygood Street, N1 Maygood Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Muriel Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
New Wharf Road, N1 New Wharf Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Noahs Yard, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Northdown Street, N1 Northdown Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Omega Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Penton Grove, N1 Penton Grove is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Penton Rise, WC1X Penton Rise is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Penton Street, N1 Penton Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Pentonville Road London, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Pentonville Road, N1 Pentonville Road connects Kings Cross and the Angel, Islington.
Priory Green, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Pultney Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Railway Street, N1 Railway Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Regent’s Canal towpath, N1 Regent’s Canal towpath is a road in the N1 postcode area
Regents Wharf, N1 Regents Wharf is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Risinghill Street, N1 Risinghill Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Ritson House, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Roding House, N1 Residential block
Rodney Street, N1 Rodney Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Southern Street, N1 Southern Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Spitfire Studios, N1 Spitfire Studios is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
St Chad’s Street, WC1H St Chads Street was formerly Derby Street.
St Chads Place, WC1X St Chads Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Terrett’s Place, N1 Terrett’s Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
The Hub, N1 Block in Kings Cross.
Thornhill Bridge Wharf, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Tiber Gardens, N1 Tiber Gardens is a road in the N1 postcode area
Tolpuddle Street, N1 Tolpuddle Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Treaty Street, N1 Treaty Street was called London Street until 1938.
Trematon Walk, N1 A street within the N1C postcode
Varnishers Yard, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Vernon Rise, WC1X Vernon Rise is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Vernon Square, WC1X Vernon Square is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Weston Rise, N1 Weston Rise is a road in the N1 postcode area
Wharf Road, N1C Wharf Road is a location in London.
Wharfdale Road, N1 Wharfdale Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Wicklow Street, WC1X Wicklow Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Wynford Road, N1 Wynford Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
York Road Curve, N1 York Road Curve is a road in the N1 postcode area
York Way, N1 York Way has been a thoroughfare since the twelfth century.
York Way, N1 York Way is a road in the N1C postcode area

NEARBY PUBS
Canal 125 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Chapel Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Charles 1 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Flat Iron King’s Cross This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lincoln Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Marathon Restaurant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Miller’s Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Northumberland Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Smithy’s Wine Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Craft Beer Co. Islington This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Crown This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Driver This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fellow This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Joker of Penton Street pub only This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Lexington This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Star of Kings This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Wine Stores This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Thornhill Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Islington

Islington grew as a sprawling Middlesex village along the line of the Great North Road, and has provided the name of the modern borough.

Some roads on the edge of the area, including Essex Road, were known as streets by the medieval period, possibly indicating a Roman origin, but little physical evidence remains. What is known is that the Great North Road from Aldersgate came into use in the 14th century, connecting with a new turnpike up Highgate Hill. This was along the line of modern Upper Street, with a toll gate at The Angel defining the extent of the village. The Back Road - modern Liverpool Road - was primarily a drovers’ road where cattle would be rested before the final leg of their journey to Smithfield. Pens and sheds were erected along this road to accommodate the animals.

The first recorded church, St Mary’s, was erected in the twelfth century and was replaced in the fifteenth century. Islington lay on the estates of the Bishop of London and the Dean and Chapter of St Pauls. There were substantial medieval moated manor houses in the area, principally at Canonbury and Highbury. In 1548, there were 440 communicants listed and the rural atmosphere, with access to the City and Westminster, made it a popular residence for the rich and eminent. The local inns, however, harboured many fugitives and recusants.

In the 17th and 18th centuries the availability of water made Islington a good place for growing vegetables to feed London. The manor became a popular excursion destination for Londoners, attracted to the area by its rural feel. Many public houses were therefore built to serve the needs of both the excursionists and travellers on the turnpike. By 1716, there were 56 ale-house keepers in Upper Street, also offering pleasure and tea gardens, and activities such as archery, skittle alleys and bowling. By the 18th century, music and dancing were offered, together with billiards, firework displays and balloon ascents. The King’s Head Tavern, now a Victorian building with a theatre, has remained on the same site, opposite the parish church, since 1543. The founder of the theatre, Dan Crawford, who died in 2005, disagreed with the introduction of decimal coinage. For twenty-plus years after decimalisation (on 15 February 1971), the bar continued to show prices and charge for drinks in ’old money’.

By the 19th century many music halls and theatres were established around Islington Green. One such was Collins’ Music Hall, the remains of which are now partly incorporated into a bookshop. The remainder of the Hall has been redeveloped into a new theatre, with its entrance at the bottom of Essex Road. It stood on the site of the Landsdowne Tavern, where the landlord had built an entertainment room for customers who wanted to sing (and later for professional entertainers). It was founded in 1862 by Samuel Thomas Collins Vagg and by 1897 had become a 1800-seat theatre with 10 bars. The theatre suffered damage in a fire in 1958 and has not reopened.

The Islington Literary and Scientific Society was established in 1833 and first met in Mr Edgeworth’s Academy on Upper Street. Its goal was to spread knowledge through lectures, discussions, and experiments - politics and theology being forbidden. A building, the Literary and Scientific Institution, was erected in 1837 in Wellington (later Almeida) Street, designed by Roumieu and Gough in a stuccoed Grecian style. It included a library (containing 3,300 volumes in 1839), reading room, museum, laboratory, and lecture theatre seating 500.

The Royal Agricultural Hall was built in 1862 on the Liverpool Road site of William Dixon’s Cattle Layers. It was built for the annual Smithfield Show in December of that year but was popular for other purposes, including recitals and the Royal Tournament. It was the primary exhibition site for London until the 20th century and the largest building of its kind, holding up to 50,000 people. It was requisitioned for use by the Mount Pleasant sorting office during World War II and never re-opened. The main hall has now been incorporated into the Business Design Centre.

The aerial bombing of World War II caused much damage to Islington’s housing stock, with 3,200 dwellings destroyed. Before the war a number of 1930s council housing blocks had been added to the stock. After the war, partly as a result of bomb site redevelopment, the council housing boom got into its stride, reaching its peak in the 1960s: several extensive estates were constructed, by both the Metropolitan Borough of Islington and the London County Council. Clearance of the worst terraced housing was undertaken, but Islington continued to be very densely populated, with a high level of overcrowding. The district has many council blocks, and the local authority has begun to replace some of them.

From the 1960s, the remaining Georgian terraces were rediscovered by middle-class families. Many of the houses were rehabilitated, and the area became newly fashionable. This displacement of the poor by the aspirational has become known as gentrification. Among the new residents were a number of figures who became central in the New Labour movement, including Tony Blair before his victory in the 1997 general election. According to The Guardian in 2006, "Islington is widely regarded as the spiritual home of Britain’s left-wing intelligentsia." The Granita Pact between Gordon Brown and Tony Blair is said to have been made at a now defunct restaurant on Upper Street.

The completion of the Victoria line and redevelopment of Angel tube station created the conditions for developers to renovate many of the early Victorian and Georgian townhouses. They also built new developments. Islington remains a district with diverse inhabitants, with its private houses and apartments not far from social housing in immediately neighbouring wards such as Finsbury and Clerkenwell to the south, Bloomsbury and King’s Cross to the west, and Highbury to the north west, and also the Hackney districts of De Beauvoir and Old Street to the north east.


LOCAL PHOTOS
The British Library
TUM image id: 1482066417
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Cromer Street
TUM image id: 1547917827
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Goods Way - old sign
TUM image id: 1526241892
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Percy Circus from above
Credit: Unknown
TUM image id: 1554673327
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Risinghill Street, N1
TUM image id: 1467032267
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
White Conduit House, and the conduit head from which it was named, 1827
Credit: Robert Chambers (1832)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Caledonian Road looking north towards Holloway
Old London postcard
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Cromer Street
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Percy Circus from above
Credit: Unknown
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Risinghill Street, N1
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

York Road was the name for a ’lost’ underground station on the Piccadilly Line north of King’s Cross. The road it was named after has also changed its name (to York Way)
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Print-friendly version of this page