Old Barn Way, DA7

Road in/near Barnehurst, existing between 1938 and now

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(51.4587 0.16695, 51.458 0.166) 
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Road · Barnehurst · DA7 ·
August
30
2021

Old Barn Way was built over the site of Mayplace Farm in 1938.

Mayplace Farm was owned by the Barne family. The farm with its 16 acres was sold for £2770 to the building firm of W.H. Wedlock. Wedlock’s had been based in Barrow-in-Furness, the home of Vickers shipyards. They moved to Crayford during the First World War because of growth of the Vickers factory.

Wedlock’s demolished the farm in the late 1930s and then used the site as their materials depot. This has caused a variety of styles and materials to be found on the houses of Old Barn Way.

Many roads in Barnehurst are named after Lake District towns because of the Cumbrian connection of Wedlock.




Main source: https://bexleywalks.co.uk/
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
Andrew MacFarlane   
Added: 25 Nov 2020 11:22 GMT   

my time at Mayplace road school
started at mayplace in 1938 the teachers were Mr English headmaster Miss Clark,Bress,and miss Black
I lived 200 yards from the school

Reply

LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

Reply
Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 4 Sep 2022 15:42 GMT   

Superman 2
I worked here in 1977. The scene in the prison laundry in Superman 2 was filmed here.

Reply

TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:44 GMT   

The world’s first underground train
The very first underground train left Paddington on the new Metropolitan Railway bound for Farringdon Street.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:17 GMT   

TV comes to Olympia
Over 7000 people queued to see the first high definition television pictures on sets at the Olympia Radio Show. The pictures were transmitted by the BBC from Alexandra Palace, introduced by Leslie Mitchell, their first announcer.

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NEARBY STREETS
Barnehurst Road, DA7 Barnehurst Road was previously called Hills and Holes Road.
Braemar Avenue, DA7 Braemar Avenue is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Braeside Crescent, DA7 Braeside Crescent is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Eastleigh Road, DA7 Eastleigh Road is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Grove Road, DA7 Grove Road is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Hillingdon Road, DA7 Hillingdon Road is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Holly Gardens, DA7 Holly Gardens is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Inglewood Road, DA7 Inglewood Road is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Kings Close, DA1 Kings Close is a road in the DA1 postcode area
Lea Vale, DA1 Lea Vale is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Lea Vale, DA1 Lea Vale is a road in the DA1 postcode area
Manor Close, DA1 Manor Close is a road in the DA1 postcode area
Manor Road, DA1 Manor Road is a road in the DA1 postcode area
Manor Way, DA7 Manor Way is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Martens Avenue, DA7 Martens Avenue was built on the site of Springfield House in the immediate post-war era.
Mayplace Road East, DA7 Mayplace Road East was an old lane leading east from Barnehurst.
Mayplace Road East, DA7 Mayplace Road East runs west-east through the DA1 and DA7 postcodes.
Midfield Avenue, DA7 Midfield Avenue is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Midfield Parade, DA7 Midfield Parade was named as it was situated in the former middle field of the local farm.
Oakwood Drive, DA7 Oakwood Drive was formed as part of the ’Mayplace Farm’ estate built by W H Wedlock Ltd.
Park Grove, DA7 Park Grove is part of the Martens Grove Estate, build in the 1930s.
Randolph Close, DA7 Randolph Close is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Stephen Road, DA7 Stephen Road is a road in the DA7 postcode area
The Marlowes, DA1 The Marlowes is a road in the DA1 postcode area
Westfield Road, DA7 Westfield Road is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Woodside Close, DA7 Woodside Close is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Woodside Road, DA7 Woodside Road is a road in the DA7 postcode area

NEARBY PUBS
Barnehurst Golf Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Phoenix Sports Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


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Barnehurst

The name of Barnehurst is derived from the name of the landowner family and the Saxon word for woodland: ’hurst’.

In 1745, Miles Barne the son of a wealthy London merchant married Elizabeth Elwick the heiress to May Place and inherited the estate in 1750. The family owned May Place until 1938 when it was sold to the local council.

The name Barnehurst came into being once a station had been proposed in Conduit Wood for the Bexley Heath Railway Company on their 1895 railway. It crossed the May Place Estate, then owned by Colonel Frederick Barne. At that time the area now known as Barnehurst was part of the Parish of Crayford, consisting of a mix of farmland and market gardens, with cherry, apple and plum orchards, with wood and parkland belonging to the estates of May Place, Martens Grove and Oakwood. The small population was concentrated along and to the south of Mayplace Road.

At first, the railway failed to attract large scale house developers - passenger numbers were small only boosted at weekends by golfers travelling to the new Barnehurst Golf Course opened in 1903. Its club house the old mansion of May Place was destroyed by fire in 1959. The electrification of the Bexleyheath Line in 1926 signalled the start of the large housing developments of the 1920s and 1930s.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Martens Avenue, Barnehurst (1934)
TUM image id: 1557161730
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Mayplace Road East (1900)
TUM image id: 1574088030
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Martens Avenue, Barnehurst (1934)
Credit: Ideal Homes
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Courtleet Bottom, Erith Road, Barnehurst (1934)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Martens Avenue, Barnehurst (1934)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Old Road, Martens Grove, Barnehurst (1934)
Credit: Ideal Homes
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Mayplace Road East (1900)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Mayplace Road East (1934)
Credit: Ideal Homes
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Midfield Parade, Barnehurt (1940s) With the growth of Barnehurst in the 1930s - commuter housing, new roads and new schools - this junction became south Barnehurst’s main shopping centre, built by Ellinghams who also developed much of Bexleyheath. The first shops were named ‘The Parade’ and provided a dozen retail units with living accommodation above.
Credit: Bexley Archives
Licence:


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