Hill Street, London

Wikipedia article in/near Mayfair, existing until now

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Wikipedia article · Mayfair · ·
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hill_Street%2C_London

Hill Street is a street in the central Mayfair district of London which runs southwest from Berkeley Square towards Park Lane. It was developed from farmland in the 18th century and was named after a small hill there...


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

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TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

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Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

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Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

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Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

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Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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danny currie   
Added: 30 Nov 2022 18:39 GMT   

dads yard
ron currie had a car breaking yard in millers yard back in the 60s good old days

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Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:39 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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Lived here
Phil Stubbington   
Added: 14 Nov 2022 16:28 GMT   

Numbers 60 to 70 (1901 - 1939)
A builder, Robert Maeers (1842-1919), applied to build six houses on plots 134 to 139 on the Lincoln House Estate on 5 October 1901. He received approval on 8 October 1901. These would become numbers 60 to 70 Rodenhurst Road (60 is plot 139). Robert Maeers was born in Northleigh, Devon. In 1901 he was living in 118 Elms Road with his wife Georgina, nee Bagwell. They had four children, Allan, Edwin, Alice, and Harriet, born between 1863 and 1873.
Alice Maeers was married to John Rawlins. Harriet Maeers was married to William Street.
Three of the six houses first appear on the electoral register in 1904:
Daniel Mescal “Ferncroft”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By the 1905 electoral register all six are occupied:

Daniel Mescal “St Senans”
Henry Robert Honeywood “Grasmere”
John Rawlins “Iveydene”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Walter Ernest Manning “St Hilda”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By 1906 house numbers replace names:

Daniel Mescal 70
Henry Robert Honeywood 68
John Rawlins 66
William Francis Street 64
Walter Ernest Manning 62
Henry Elkin 60

It’s not clear whether number 70 changed from “Ferncroft” to “St Senans” or possibly Daniel Mescal moved houses.

In any event, it can be seen that Robert Maeers’ two daughters are living in numbers 64 and 66, with, according to local information, an interconnecting door. In the 1911 census William Street is shown as a banker’s clerk. John Rawlins is a chartering clerk in shipping. Robert Maeers and his wife are also living at this address, Robert being shown as a retired builder.

By 1939 all the houses are in different ownership except number 60, where the Elkins are still in residence.


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stephen garraway   
Added: 13 Nov 2022 13:56 GMT   

Martin Street, Latimer Road
I was born at St Charlottes and lived at 14, Martin Street, Latimer Road W10 until I was 4 years old when we moved to the east end. It was my Nan Grant’s House and she was the widow of George Frederick Grant. She had two sons, George and Frederick, and one daughter, my mother Margaret Patricia.
The downstairs flat where we lived had two floors, the basement and the ground floor. The upper two floors were rented to a Scot and his family, the Smiths. He had red hair. The lights and cooker were gas and there was one cold tap over a Belfast sink. A tin bath hung on the wall. The toilet was outside in the yard. This was concreted over and faced the the rear of the opposite terraces. All the yards were segregated by high brick walls. The basement had the a "best" room with a large , dark fireplace with two painted metal Alsation ornaments and it was very dark, cold and little used.
The street lights were gas and a man came round twice daily to turn them on and off using a large pole with a hook and a lighted torch on the end. I remember men coming round the streets with carts selling hot chestnuts and muffins and also the hurdy gurdy man with his instrument and a monkey in a red jacket. I also remember the first time I saw a black man and my mother pulling me away from him. He had a Trilby and pale Mackintosh so he must of been one of the first of the Windrush people. I seem to recall he had a thin moustache.
Uncle George had a small delivery lorry but mum lost touch with him and his family. Uncle Fred went to Peabody Buildings near ST.Pauls.
My Nan was moved to a maisonette in White City around 1966, and couldn’t cope with electric lights, cookers and heating and she lost all of her neighbourhood friends. Within six months she had extreme dementia and died in a horrible ward in Tooting Bec hospital a year or so later. An awful way to end her life, being moved out of her lifelong neighbourhood even though it was slums.

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Comment
   
Added: 31 Oct 2022 18:47 GMT   

Memories
I lived at 7 Conder Street in a prefab from roughly 1965 to 1971 approx - happy memories- sad to see it is no more ?

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Eve Glover   
Added: 22 Oct 2022 09:28 GMT   

Shenley Road
Shenley Road is the main street in Borehamwood where the Job Centre and Blue Arrow were located

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Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

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Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
25 Park Lane 25 Park Lane was the London residence of Sir Philip Sassoon.
An Omnibus Ride to Piccadilly Circus An Omnibus Ride to Piccadilly Circus, Mr Gladstone Travelling with Ordinary Passengers, 1885
Down Street Down Street, also known as Down Street (Mayfair), is a disused station on the London Underground, located in Mayfair.
Londonderry House Londonderry House was an aristocratic townhouse situated on Park Lane.
Royal Institution The Royal Institution of Great Britain (Royal Institution) is an organisation for scientific education and research, based in the City of Westminster.
Shepherd Market Shepherd Market was described by Arthur Bingham Walkley in 1925 as one of the oddest incongruities in London.
The Athenaeum Hotel The Athenaeum is a family-owned five-star hotel overlooking Green Park.

NEARBY STREETS
Achilles Way, W1K Achilles Way is named for the nearby Wellington as Achilles statue in Hyde Park.
Adams Row, W1K On the Grosvenor estate, Adams Row extends from South Audley Street to Carlos Place.
Albemarle Street, W1S Albemarle Street takes its name from the second Duke of Albermarle, son of General Monk.
Aldford Street, W1K Aldford Street is named after Aldford, a property on the Grosvenor family’s Cheshire estates.
Archibald Mews, W1J Archibald Mews was formerly John Court, after local landowner John, Lord Berkeley.
Ashburton Place, W1J Ashburton Place connects Clarges Street and Bolton Street.
Audley Square, W1K Audley Square is named after Hugh Audley.
Avery Row, W1K Avery Row was probably named after Henry Avery, an 18th century bricklayer who built this street over the Tyburn Brook.
Balfour Mews, W1K Balfour Mews is the southern extention of Balfour Place.
Balfour Place, W1K Balfour Place honours Eustace Balfour, surveyor for the Grosvenor estate from 1890 to 1910.
Barlow Place, W1S This is a street in the W1J postcode area
Berkeley Square House, W1J Berkeley Square House is a building on Berkeley Square
Berkeley Square, W1J Berkeley Square was originally laid out in the mid 18th century by architect William Kent.
Berkeley Street, W1J Berkeley Street runs from Piccadilly to Berkeley Square.
Bolton Street, W1J Bolton Street runs from Curzon Street in the north to Piccadilly in the south.
Bourdon Place, W1J Bourdon Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Bourdon Street, W1J Bourdon Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Boyle Street, W1S Boyle Street was built on a piece of land called the Ten Acres to discharge some Boyle family debts.
Brick Street, W1J Brick Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Brooks Mews, W1K Brooks Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Bruton Lane, W1S Bruton Lane is a road in the W1S postcode area
Bruton Place, W1J Bruton Place is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Bruton Street, W1S Bruton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Carlos Place, W1 Carlos Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Carrington Street, W1J Carrington Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Charles Street, W1J Charles Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Chesterfield Gardens, W1J Chesterfield Gardens is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Chesterfield Street, W1J Chesterfield Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Clarges Mews, W1J Clarges Mews is a mews at the top of Clarges Street.
Clarges Street, W1J Clarges Street runs north from Piccadilly.
Clifford Street, W1S Clifford Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Coach And Horses Yard, W1S Coach And Horses Yard is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Conduit Street, W1S Conduit Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Cork Street, W1S Cork Street, on the Burlington Estate, was named after Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington and 4th Earl of Cork.
Culross Street, W1K Culross Street is a road in the W1K postcode area
Curzon Square, W1K Curzon Square is a road in the W1K postcode area
Curzon Street, W1J Curzon Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Davies Street, W1K Davies Street is a north-south street in Mayfair.
Davis Street, W1K Davis Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Deanery Street, W1K Deanery Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Derby Street, W1J Derby Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Dorchester Ride, W1K Dorchester Ride is a road in the W1K postcode area
Dover Street, W1J Dover Street is notable for its Georgian architecture as well as the location of historic London clubs and hotels.
Down Street Mews, W1J Down Street Mews is a largely hidden side street in Mayfair.
Down Street, W1J Down Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Dunraven Street, W1K Dunraven Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Farm Street, W1J Farm Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Fitzmaurice Place, W1J Fitzmaurice Place is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Garrick House, W1J Residential block
Grafton Street, W1S Grafton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Grosvenor Hill, W1K Grosvenor Hill is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Grosvenor Square, W1K Grosvenor Square is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Grosvenor Square, W1K Grosvenor Square was developed by Sir Richard Grosvenor from 1721 onwards.
Grosvenor Street, W1K Grosvenor Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Half Moon Street, W1J Half Moon Street runs between Piccadilly and Curzon Street.
Hay Hill, W1S Hay Hill is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Hay’s Mews, W1J This is a street in the W1J postcode area
Hertford Street, W1J Hertford Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Hill Street, W1J Hill Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Jones Street, W1K Jones Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Landsdowne Row, W1J Landsdowne Row is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Lansdowne House, W1J Lansdowne House is a block on Berkeley Square
Lansdowne Row, W1J Lansdowne Row is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Lees Place, W1K Lees Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Lovers’ Walk, W1K Lovers’ Walk is a road in the W1K postcode area
Market Mews, W1J Market Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Mayfair Place, W1J Mayfair Place runs behind Devonshire House.
Mill Street, W1S Mill Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Mount Row, W1K Mount Row was formed from two stable yards.
Mount Street Mews, W1 Mount Street Mews is a road in the W1K postcode area
Mount Street, W1K Mount Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Mount Street, W1K Mount Street is a road in the W1 postcode area
New Bond Street, W1J New Bond Street is the northernmost section of what is simply known as ’Bond Street’ in general use.
Park Lane, W1K Park Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Park Lane, W1K Park Lane is a road in the W1J postcode area
Park Street, W1K Park Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Park Towers, W1J Park Towers is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Piccadilly, W1J Piccadilly is a major road in the West End.
Pitt’s Head Mews, W1K Pitt’s Head Mews is a road in the W1J postcode area
Pollen Street, W1S Pollen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Queen Street, W1J Queen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Red Lion Yard, W1J Red Lion Yard is a road in the W1K postcode area
Reeves Mews, W1K Reeves Mews is a road in the W1K postcode area
Rex Place, W1K Rex Place is a road in the W1K postcode area
Royal Arcade, W1S Royal Arcade is an alleyway of exclusive shops.
Shepherd Market, W1J Shepherd Market was developed between 1735 and 1746 by Edward Shepherd from an open area called Brook Field
Shepherd Street, W1J Shepherd Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Shepherds Place, W1K Shepherds Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
South Audley Street, W1K South Audley Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
South Street, W1K South Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
St Georges Square, W1S St Georges Square is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Stafford Street, W1S Stafford Street is named after Margaret Stafford, partner of developer Sir Thomas Bond who built on this site in the seventeenth century.
Stanhope Gate, W1K Stanhope Gate is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Stanhope Row, W1J Stanhope Row is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Stratton Street, W1J Stratton Street forms an L shape between Piccadilly and Berkeley Street.
The Ritz Arcade, SW1A The Ritz Arcade lies outside The Ritz Hotel.
Three Kings’ Yard, W1K This is a street in the W1K postcode area
Tilney Street, W1K Tilney Street is a road in the W1K postcode area
Trebeck Street, W1J Trebeck Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Upper Brook Street, W1K Upper Brook Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Upper Grosvenor Street, W1K Upper Grosvenor Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Waverton Street, W1J Waverton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
White Horse Street, W1J White Horse Street runs from Piccadilly to Shepherd Street.
Woods Mews, W1K Woods Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Yarmouth Place, W1J Yarmouth Place lies off Brick Street.

NEARBY PUBS
Coach & Horses The Coach & Horses is at the top of Bruton Lane.


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 526 completed street histories and 46974 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


Mayfair

Mayfair (originally called The May Fair) is an area of central London, by the east edge of Hyde Park. Mayfair boasts some of the capital’s most exclusive property of all types.

Mayfair is named after the annual fortnight-long May Fair that took place on the site that is Shepherd Market today. In 1764, the May Fair was banned at Shepherd Market because the well-to-do residents of the area disliked the fair’s disorderliness, and it moved to Fair Field in Bow in the East End of London.

The district is now mainly commercial, with many former homes converted into offices for major corporations headquarters, embassies and also hedge funds and real estate businesses. There remains a substantial quantity of residential property as well as some exclusive shopping and London’s largest concentration of luxury hotels and many restaurants. Rents are among the highest in London and the world.

The freehold of a large section of Mayfair also belongs to the Crown Estate.

The renown and prestige of Mayfair could have grown in the popular mind because it is the most expensive property on the British Monopoly set. Victor Watson, the head of Waddingtons at the time, and his secretary Marjory Phillips, chose the London place names for the British version — Ms Phillips apparently went for a walk around London to choose suitable sites.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Montagu House, Portman Square
TUM image id: 1510140427
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Belgrave Square
Credit: Thomas Shepherd
TUM image id: 1586353394
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The Wellington Statue on the Arch in the 1850s
Credit: Unknown
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Exterior of the memorial in 2013.
Credit: Tim Rademacher
Licence: CC BY 2.0


A Friday Evening Discourse at the Royal Institution; Sir James Dewar on Liquid Hydrogen (1904)
Credit: Henry Jamyn Brooks
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Street view of St George’s Hanover Square (1787). An aquatint, by T. Malton.
Credit: British Library
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Wellington Arch photographed on 10 January 2017. Wellington Arch was built as an original entrance to Buckingham Palace, later becoming a victory arch proclaiming Wellington’s defeat of Napoleon. Crowned by the largest bronze sculpture in Europe, it depicts the Angel of Peace descending on the ’Quadriga’ - or four-horsed chariot - of War. The pathway that runs underneath the arch has a formal name - Apsley Way.
Credit: The Underground Map
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Hedonism Wines, Davies Street (2022)
Credit: Simon Gunzinger
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41 and 42 Dover Street, Mayfair (2022)
Credit: Wiki Commons/No Swan So Fine
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Hyde Park Corner in 1842, looking east towards Piccadilly. The entrance to Hyde Park through Decimus Burton’s Ionic Screen is on the left, and behind it, in darker stone, is Apsley House.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Oxford Street, 1935
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Picton Place, W1 was formerly Gray Street as can be seen on a ’ghost sign’ on the corner
Credit: Simon Gunzinger
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