Notting Hill

Suburb, existing between the 1820s and now

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  OPENSTREETMAP  GOOGLE MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.512 -0.206, 51.512 -0.206) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Suburb · Notting Hill · W11 ·
September
6
2015

Notting Hill: A place whose fortunes have come, gone and come again...

Notting Hill is a cosmopolitan district known as the location for the annual Notting Hill Carnival, and for being home to the Portobello Road Market.

The word Notting might originate from a Saxon called Cnotta with the =ing part indicating "the place inhibited by the people of" - i.e. where Cnotta’s tribe lived. There was a farm called variously "Knotting-Bernes,", "Knutting-Barnes" or "Nutting-barns" and this name was transferred to the hill above it.

The area remained rural until the westward expansion of London reached Bayswater in the early 19th century. The main landowner in Notting Hill was the Ladbroke family, and from the 1820s James Weller Ladbroke began to undertake the development of the Ladbroke Estate. Working with the architect and surveyor Thomas Allason, Ladbroke began to lay out streets and houses, with a view to turning the area into a fashionable suburb of the capital (although the development did not get seriously under way until the 1840s). Many of these streets bear the Ladbroke name, including Ladbroke Grove, the main north-south axis of the area, and Ladbroke Square, the largest private garden square in London.

The original idea was to call the district Kensington Park, and other roads (notably Kensington Park Road and Kensington Park Gardens) are reminders of this. The local telephone prefix 7727 (originally 727) is based on the old telephone exchange name of PARk.

The reputation of the district altered over the course of the 20th century. As middle class households ceased to employ servants, the large Notting Hill houses lost their market and were increasingly split into multiple occupation.

For much of the 20th century the large houses were subdivided into multi-occupancy rentals. Caribbean immigrants were drawn to the area in the 1950s, partly because of the cheap rents, but were exploited by slum landlords like Peter Rachman, and also became the target of white racist Teddy Boys in the 1958 Notting Hill race riots.

Notting Hill was slowly gentrified from the 1980s onwards now has a contemporary reputation as an affluent and fashionable area; known for attractive terraces of large Victorian townhouses, and high-end shopping and restaurants (particularly around Westbourne Grove and Clarendon Cross).

A Daily Telegraph article in 2004 used the phrase the ’Notting Hill Set’ to refer to a group of emerging Conservative politicians, such as David Cameron and George Osborne, who were once based in Notting Hill.

Since it was first developed in the 1830s, Notting Hill has had an association with artists and ’alternative’ culture.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence



CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


Reply
Reply
john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:48 GMT   

Mary Place Workhouse
There was a lady called Ivy who lived in the corner she use to come out an tell us kids off for climbing over the fence to play football on the green. Those were the days.

Reply
Comment
charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

Reply

Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

Reply
Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 28 Dec 2020 08:31 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
I was born in Hammersmith Hospital (Ducane Rd) I lived at 40 Blecynden Street from birth in 1942 to 1967 when I moved due to oncoming demolition for the West way flyover.
A bomb fell locally during the war and cracked one of our windows, that crack was still there the day I left.
It was a great street to have grown up in I have very fond memories of living there.



Reply
Reply
john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:30 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Went to school St Johns with someone named Barry Green who lived in that St. Use to wait for him on the corner take a slow walk an end up being late most days.

Reply
Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

Reply
Comment
Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

Reply
Reply
Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:27 GMT   

Hewer Street, W10
My husband Barry Newton lived over John Nodes in Hewer Street in 1950’s. Barry dad Tom worked for John Nodes and raced pigeons in his spare time Tom and his Lena raised 5 sons there before moving to the Southcoast in the mid 70’s due to Tom ill health

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

Reply
Born here
Susan Wright   
Added: 16 Sep 2017 22:42 GMT   

Ada Crowe, 9 Bramley Mews
My Great Grandmother Ada Crowe was born in 9 Bramley Mews in 1876.

Reply
Comment
ken gaston   
Added: 16 Jan 2021 11:04 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My grandmother Hilda Baker and a large family lived in number 18 . It was a close community and that reflected in the coronation celebration held on the central green . I grew up in that square and went to school at Sirdar Road then St. Clements it was a great place to grow up with a local park and we would also trek to Holland Park or Kensington Gardens .Even then the area was considered deprived and a kindergarden for criminals . My generation were the first to escape to the new towns and became the overspill from London to get decent housing and living standards .

Reply
Reply
john ormandy   
Added: 14 Mar 2021 18:59 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
We moved to number 6 in 1950 an family still live there now. I think i remember a family name of Larter living in the house you mention also living in the Gdns were names Prior, Cannon, Parsons Clives at number 26 who i went to school with.


Reply
Reply
Brian Lucas   
Added: 15 Mar 2021 16:02 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
I also lived here at No. 15 1854 then move to No. 23 The Lucas Family

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

Reply
Comment
Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

Reply

   
Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 2 Jun 2021 16:58 GMT   

Parachute bomb 1941
Charles Thomas Bailey of 82 Morley Road was killed by the parachute bomb March 1941

Reply

   
Added: 1 Jun 2021 12:41 GMT   

Abbeville Road (1940 street directory)
North west side
1A Clarke A S Ltd, motor engineers
15 Plumbers, Glaziers & Domestic Engineers Union
25 Dixey Edward, florist
27 Vicary Miss Doris J, newsagent
29 Stenning John Andrew, dining rooms
31 Clarke & Williams, builders
33 Hill Mrs Theodora, confectioner
35 Golding W & sons, corn dealers
... here is Shandon road ...
37 Pennington Mrs Eliz Harvie, wine & spirit merchant
39 Westminster Catering Co Ltd, ham, beef & tongue dealers
41 Masters A (Clapham) Ltd, butchers
43 Thomas Euan Ltd, grocers
45 Garrett C T & Co Ltd, undertakers
47 Mayle T & Sons, fishmongers
49 Mayles Ltd, fruiterers
51 & 73 Hardy Arthur Sydney, draper
53 United Dairies (London) Ltd
... here is Narbonne avenue ...
55 Norris William Lennox, baker
57 Silver Star Laundry Ltd
59 Thorp John, oilman
61 Bidgood Leonard George, boot makers
63 Wilkie Rt Miln, chemist
65 Gander George Albert Isaac, hairdresser
67 Harris Alfred William, greengrocer
69 & 71 Lambert Ernest & Son Ltd, grocers
... here is Hambolt road ...
73 & 51 Hardy Arthur Sydney, draper
75 Cambourn Frederick, butcher
77 Siggers Clement, chemist
77 Post, Money Order, Telephone Call & Telegraph Office & Savings Bank
79 Hemmings William, baker
... here is Elms road ...
85 Cornish Joseph
91 Bedding Mrs
151 Johnson Mrs H K
157 Robinson Albert Ernest, grainer
173 Yardleys London & Provincial Stores Ltd, wine & spirit merchants
175 Clark Alfred, butcher
175A Morley Douglas Frederick, confectioner
... here is Crescent lane ...
... her is St Alphonsus road ...

South east side
... here is Trouville road ...
4 Bossy Miss, private school
... here are Bonneville gardens ...
24 Osborn Charles Edward, ladies hairdresser
24 Hall H Ltd, builders
24A Walton Lodge Laundry Ltd
... here are Shandon road & Abbeville mansions ...
28 Copley Fred Smith, chemist
30 Finch H G Ltd, laundry
32 Carter William Alfred, furniture dealer
34 Spriggs Charles & Co, wireless supplies dealer
36 Miles Frederick William, confectioner
38 Pitman Frederick, hairdresser
40 Rowe Frederick F, valeting service
42 Modridge Edward J, oilman
... here is Narbonne avenue ...
44 Southorn Albert, butcher
46 Brown Ernest, fruiterer
48 Stanley Mrs A A, confectioner
50 Fryatt Owen, delixatessen store
52 Benbrooks, domestic stores
54 Davis William Clifford, boot repairer
56 Blogg Alfred, newsagent
58 Rowlands Thomas & Sons, dairy
... here are Hambalt, Elms, Franconia, Caldervale & Leppoc roads ...
124 Clarke Frederick, decorator
... here are Crescent lane, Briarwood road & Park hill ...

Reply
Comment
Boo Horton    
Added: 31 May 2021 13:39 GMT   

Angel & Trumpet, Stepney Green
The Angel & Trumpet Public House in Stepney Green was run by my ancestors in the 1930’s. Unfortunately, it was a victim on WWII and was badly damaged and subsequently demolished. I have one photograph that I believe to bethe pub, but it doesn’t show much more that my Great Aunt cleaning the steps.

Reply
Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Earl of Zetland The Earl of Zetland - a pub in the Potteries
Horbury Chapel (Kensington Temple) In September 1849, the Horbury Chapel, Notting Hill was officially opened.
Kensington Hippodrome The Kensington Hippodrome was a racecourse built in Notting Hill, London, in 1837, by entrepreneur John Whyte.
Ladbroke Square Garden Ladbroke Square communal garden lies in Notting Hill.
Mercury Theatre The Mercury Theatre was situated at 2a Ladbroke Road, next to the Kensington Temple.
Notting Hill in Bygone Days Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone, was originally published in 1924 by T. Fisher Unwin.
St John’s Hill St John’s Hill is the highest point in the area.
St John’s, Notting Hill St John’s Notting Hill is a Victorian Anglican church built in 1845 in Lansdowne Crescent, Notting Hill.
The Brittania The Brittania was situated on the corner of Clarendon Road and Portland Road, W11.
The Crown The Crown was situated at 57 Princedale Road.

THE STREETS OF NOTTING HILL
Acklam Road, W10 Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway.
Alba Place, W11 Alba Place is part of the Colville Conservation Area.
All Saints Road, W11 Built between 1852-61, All Saints Road is named after All Saints Church on Talbot Road.
Artesian Road, W11 Artesian Road lies just over the boundary into Paddington from Notting Hill.
Arundel Gardens, W11 Arundel Gardens was built towards the end of the development of the Ladbroke Estate, in the early 1860s.
Bangor Street, W11 Bangor Street, W11 was situated on the site of the modern Henry Dickens Court.
Basing Street, W11 Basing Street was originally Basing Road between 1867 and 1939.
Blagrove Road, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode.
Blenheim Crescent, W11 Blenheim Crescent one of the major thoroughfares in Notting Hill - indeed it features in the eponymous film.
Boxmoor Street, W11 Boxmoor Street was also known as Henry Place and Beaumont Street during its brief life.
Camelford Walk, W11 Camelford Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
Chepstow Crescent, W11 Chepstow Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Chepstow Villas, W11 Chepstow Villas is a road in W11 with a chequered history.
Clarendon Road, W11 Clarendon Road is one of the W11’s longest streets, running from Holland Park Avenue in the south to Dulford Street in the north.
Clydesdale Road, W11 Clydesdale Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Codrington Mews, W11 This attractive L-shaped mews lies off Blenheim Crescent between Kensington Park Road and Ladbroke Grove.
Colville Gardens, W11 Colville Gardens was laid out in the 1870s by the builder George Frederick Tippett, who developed much of the rest of the neighbourhood.
Colville Houses, W11 Colville Houses is part of the Colville Conservation Area.
Colville Mews, W11 Colville Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Colville Road, W11 Colville Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Colville Square, W11 Colville Square is a street in Notting Hill.
Colville Terrace, W11 Colville Terrace, W11 has strong movie connnections.
Convent Gardens, W11 Convent Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Cornwall Crescent, W11 Cornwall Crescent belongs to the third and final period of building on the Ladbroke estate.
Cornwall Road, W11 Cornwall Road was once the name for the westernmost part of Westbourne Park Road.
Dale Row, W11 Dale Row is a street in Notting Hill.
Darnley Terrace, W11 Darnley Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Denbigh Close, W11 Denbigh Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Denbigh Road, W11 Denbigh Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Denbigh Terrace, W11 Denbigh Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Dunworth Mews, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Elgin Crescent, W11 Elgin Crescent runs from Portobello Road west across Ladbroke Grove and then curls round to the south to join Clarendon Road.
Elgin Mews, W11 Elgin Mews lies in Notting Hill.
Evesham Street, W11 Evesham Street is a street in Notting Hill.
Folly Mews, W11 Folly Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Freston Road, W11 The southern end of Freston Road stretches over into the W11 postcode.
Golden Mews, W11 Golden Mews was a tiny mews off of Basing Street, W11.
Hayden’s Place, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Hayden’s Place, W11 Haydens Place is a small cul-de-sac off of the Portobello Road.
Hayden’s Place, W11 Hayden’s Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Hedgegate Court, W11 Hedgegate Court is a street in Notting Hill.
Henry Dickens Court, W11 Henry Dickens Court is a location in London.
Horbury Crescent, W11 Horbury Crescent is a short half-moon shaped street between Ladbroke Road and Kensington Park Road.
Hume Road, W11 Hume Road ran from Norland Gardens to Norland Road.
Hunt Close, W11 Hunt Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Kenley Street, W11 Kenley Street, W11 was originally William Street before it disappeared.
Kenley Walk, W11 Kenley Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
Kensington Park Gardens, W11 Kensington Park Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Kensington Park Mews, W11 Kensington Park Mews lies off of Kensington Park Road, W11
Kensington Park Road, W11 Kensington Park Road is one of the main streets in Notting Hill.
Ladbroke Crescent, W11 Ladbroke Crescent belongs to the third and final great period of building on the Ladbroke estate and the houses were constructed in the 1860s.
Ladbroke Gardens, W11 Ladbroke Gardens runs between Ladbroke Grove and Kensington Park Road.
Ladbroke Grove, W11 Ladbroke Grove is the main street in London W11.
Ladbroke Road, W11 Ladbroke Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Ladbroke Square, W11 The huge Ladbroke Square communal garden is part communal garden accessed from the backs of the houses lining it and part traditional London Square with roads between the houses and the square.
Ladbroke Terrace, W11 Ladbroke Terrace was one of the first streets to be created on the Ladbroke estate.
Ladbroke Walk, W11 Ladbroke Walk, W11 is part of the Ladbroke Conversation Area.
Lambton Place, W11 Lambton Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Lancaster Road, W11 Lancaster Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Lansdowne Crescent, W11 Lansdowne Crescent has some of the most interesting and varied houses on the Ladbroke estate, as architects and builders experimented with different styles.
Lansdowne Rise, W11 Lansdowne Rise, W11 was originally called Montpelier Road.
Lansdowne Road, W11 Lansdowne Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Lansdowne Walk, W11 Lansdowne Walk was named after the Lansdowne area of Cheltenham.
Ledbury Mews North, W11 Ledbury Mews North is a street in Notting Hill.
Ledbury Mews West, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Ledbury Road, W11 Ledbury Road is split between W2 and W11, the postal line intersecting the street.
Lonsdale Road, W11 Lonsdale Road is a street in Notting Hill.
McGregor Road, W11 McGregor Road runs between St Luke’s Road and All Saints Road.
Needham Road, W11 Needham Road was formerly Norfolk Road.
Nicholas Road, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Norland Road, W11 Norland Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Olaf Street, W11 Olaf Street is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Crescent, W11 Pembridge Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Mews, W11 Pembridge Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Road, W2 Pembridge Road is the former southern end of Portobello Lane.
Pembridge Villas, W11 Pembridge Villas is a street in Notting Hill.
Pencombe Mews, W11 Pencombe Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Penzance Place, W11 Penzance Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Pinehurst Court, W11 Pinehurst Court is a mansion block at 1-9 Colville Gardens.
Portland Gate, W11 Portland Gate is a road in the SW7 postcode area
Portland Road, W11 Portland Road is a street in Notting Hill, rich at one end and poor at the other.
Portobello Road, W11 Portobello Road is internationally famous for its market.
Pottery Lane, W11 Pottery Lane takes its name from the brickfields which were situated at the northern end of the street.
Powis Gardens, W11 Powis Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Powis Square, W11 Powis Square is a square between Talbot Road and Colville Terrace.
Powis Terrace, W11 Powis Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Princedale Road, W11 Princedale Road was formerly Princes Road.
Princes Place, W11 Princes Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Queensdale Crescent, W11 Queensdale Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Queensdale Place, W11 Queensdale Place is a cul-de-sac which runs just off Queensdale Road.
Raddington Road, W10 Raddington Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Rifle Place, W11 Rifle Place is a road in the W11 postcode area
Rosehart Mews, W11 Rosehart Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Rosmead Road, W11 Rosmead Road, W11 was originally called Chichester Road.
Runcorn Place, W11 Runcorn Place was once Thomas Place, and before even that ’The Mews’.
Saunders Grove, W11 Saunders Grove ran east from Norland Gardens.
Silvester Mews, W11 Silvester Mews was a mews off of Basing Street, W11.
Simon Close, W11 Simon Close is a street in Notting Hill.
St Ann’s Road, W11 St Ann’s Road, along with St Ann’s Villas, runs north from Royal Crescent.
St Ann’s Villas, W11 St Ann’s Villas, a tree-lined if busy road, leads into Royal Crescent from St Ann’s Road.
St James’s Gardens, W11 St James’s Gardens is an attractive garden square with St James Church in the middle of the communal garden.
St John’s Gardens, W11 St John’s Gardens runs around St John’s church.
St John’s Mews, W11 St John’s Mews is a redeveloped mews off of Ledbury Road.
St Lukes Mews, W11 St Lukes Mews is a mews off of All Saints Road, W11.
St Mark’s Place, W11 St Mark’s Place is situated on the site of the former Kensington Hippodrome.
Stanley Crescent, W11 Stanley Crescent was named after Edward Stanley.
Stanley Gardens Mews, W11 Stanley Gardens Mews existed between 1861 and the mid 1970s.
Stanley Gardens, W11 Stanley Gardens was built in the 1850s.
Swanscombe House, W11 Residential block
Swanscombe Road, W11 Swanscombe Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Talbot Road, W11 The oldest part of Talbot Road lies in London, W11.
Tavistock Crescent, W11 Tavistock Crescent was where the first Notting Hill Carnival procession began on 18 September 1966.
Tavistock Mews, W11 Tavistock Mews, W11 lies off of the Portobello Road.
Tavistock Road, W11 Tavistock Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Testerton Walk, W11 Testerton Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
Threshers Place, W11 Threshers Place is a quiet street with a long story.
Vernon Yard, W11 Vernon Yard is a mews off of Portobello Road.
Walmer Road, W11 Walmer Road is the oldest street in the area, dating from the eighteenth century or before.
Wellington Close, W11 Wellington Close is a street in Notting Hill.
West Cross Route, W11 The West Cross Route is a 1.21 km-long dual carriageway running north-south between the northern elevated roundabout junction with the western end of Westway (A40) and the southern Holland Park Roundabout.
Westbourne Grove Mews, W11 Westbourne Grove Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Westbourne Grove, W11 Westbourne Grove is one of the main roads of Notting Hill.
Westfield Way, W12 Westfield Way is a road in the W12 postcode area
Westway, W10 Westway is the A40(M) motorway which runs on an elevated section along the W10/W11 border.
Wilby Mews, W11 Wilby Mews was named after Benjamin Wilby, who was involved in several 19th century development schemes.
Wilsham Street, W11 Wilsham Street was formerly known as St Katherine’s Road.

THE PUBS OF NOTTING HILL
Albert Hotel The Albert Hotel stood on the corner of All Saints Road and Westbourne Park Road.
Beach Blanket Babylon This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Duke of Cornwall The Duke of Cornwall pub morphed into the uber-trendy "The Ledbury" restaurant.
Duke of Wellington This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Earl of Zetland The Earl of Zetland - a pub in the Potteries
Kensington Park Hotel The KPH is a landmark pub on Ladbroke Grove.
Ladbroke Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Latimer Arms The Latimer Arms was situated at 79 Norland Road.
Mau Mau This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Portobello Gold This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Portobello Star This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sun in Splendour This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Academy This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Apollo The Apollo pub was located at 18 All Saints Road, on the southeast corner of the Lancaster Road junction.
The Brittania The Brittania was situated on the corner of Clarendon Road and Portland Road, W11.
The Castle The (Warwick) Castle is located on the corner of Portobello Road and Westbourne Park Road.
The Cock & Bottle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Crown The Crown was situated at 57 Princedale Road.
The Elgin The Elgin is a Grade II listed public house at 96 Ladbroke Grove.
Walmer Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.




LOCAL PHOTOS
Children of Ruston Close
TUM image id: 1545251090
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Ladbroke Grove (1866)
TUM image id: 1513618275
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Pembridge Road (1900s)
TUM image id: 1556889569
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Kensington Park Hotel
TUM image id: 1453375720
Licence: CC BY 2.0
201311211613
TUM image id: 1453376699
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Bassett Road, W10
TUM image id: 1563717408
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Chesterton Road, W10
TUM image id: 1563717983
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Children of Ruston Close
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The Tile Kiln, Notting Dale (1824)
Credit: Florence Gladstone
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Kensington Park Hotel
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The Tabernacle is a Grade II*-listed building in Powis Square, W11 built in 1887 as a church. Photographed here in 2010.
Credit: Asteuartw
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Duke of Cornwall, Ledbury Road W11, around 1990. Now The Ledbury restaurant, holder of 2 Michelin Stars as of 2014.
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

St Peter's Notting Hill
Credit: Asteuartw
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The Hippodrome, about 1840, showing St John’s Hill in the background.
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

201311211613
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Cambridge Gardens (Oxford Mews on the left here is now Malton Mews)
Credit: Kensington Libraries
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Oxford Gardens, W10
Old London postcard
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Print-friendly version of this page