Western Dwellings, W10

Block in/near Kensal Town, existed between the 1870s and 2014

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(51.52532 -0.21442) 

Western Dwellings, W10

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Block · Kensal Town · W10 ·
August
23
2020

Western Dwellings were a row of houses, opposite the Western Gas Works, housing some of the workers.

Western Dwellings was built beside the steps leading down to Southern Row. The flats were entered through arched door ways which lead onto stone stairways. The insides of these arched entrances were tiled in dark-coloured Victorian tiles with each panel portraying a scene of working people.

In the 1890s, an outbreak of typhoid was noted there.

Beside the flats was Hamrax, the motorcyclists’ emporium, and a tobacconists/sweet shop.




Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


Western Dwellings as marked on an 1888 map of the area

Western Dwellings as marked on an 1888 map of the area
User unknown/public domain

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
29 Rackham Street, W10 29 Rackham Street lay about halfway along on the north side of the street.
6 East Row, W10 6 East Row was a house along East Row which was demolished in 1960 as part of slum clearance in the area.
Adair Road before redevelopment A photo showing Adair Road’s junction with Golborne Gardens in March 1964.
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed) The Admiral Blake was situated at the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Barlby Road.
Barlby Primary School Barlby Road Primary School has long served the children of North Kensington.
Clayton Arms A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town.
Corner of Rackham Street, Ladbroke Grove (1950) The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance is the traditional starting point for the Notting Hill Carnival.
Exmoor Street (1950) Photographed just after the Second World War, looking north along Exmoor Street.
Gas Light and Coke Company The gasometers of the Gas Light and Coke company dominated North Kensington until demolition in the late 20th century.
Hudson's the chemist (1906) Hudson's, a chemist shop, stood on the corner of Ilbert Street and Third Avenue in the Queen's Park estate.
Jack of Newbury The Jack of Newbury stood at the corner of East Row and Kensal Road until it was bombed on 2 October 1940.
Kensal House There are two Kensal Houses in London W10 - this was the original
Ladbroke Grove looking north (1900) This early 1900s image was taken just south of the junction of Ladbroke Grove and Treverton Street.
Ladbroke Grove looking north (1950) Ladbroke Grove on the corner of St Charles Sqaure taken outside the Eagle public house, looking north, just prior to the outbreak of the Second World War.
Ladbroke Grove railway bridge Looking north over Bartle Bridge in the 1950s
Lads of the Village One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road.
Middle Row School Middle Row School was established in the late 19th century to provide education to the children of Kensal New Town.
Portobello Arms The Portobello Arms was a former pub in Kensal Town, established in 1842.
Queen’s Park Library Queen’s Park Library was built to improve the minds of the new Queen’s Park Estate residents.
Rackham Street, eastern end (1950) The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
Rackham Street, western end (1950) A bombed-out Rackham Street, looking down from the junction with Exmoor Street.
St Charles Hospital The St Marylebone workhouse infirmary was opened in 1881 on Rackham Street, North Kensington and received a congratulatory letter from Florence Nightingale.
St Charles Square after bombing (1950) A corner of St Charles Square looking north, just after the Second World War
St Charles Square ready for redevelopment (1951) Photographed in 1951, the corner of St Charles Square and Ladbroke Grove looking northwest just after the Second World War.
St Martins Mission Saint Martin's Mission was originally known as Rackham Hall as it was situated on Rackham Street.
St Quintin Park Cricket Ground (1890s) Before the turn of the 20th century, west of present day North Kensington lay fields - the future Barlby Road was the site of the St Quintin Park Cricket Ground.
The Eagle The Eagle, on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Telford Road.
The Flora The Flora is situated on Harrow Road, W10.
The Foresters A lost pub of London W10
The Mitre The Mitre was situated at 62 Golborne Road.
The Plough From the sixteenth century onwards, the Plough stood beside the Harrow Road.
The Victoria (Narrow Boat) The Victoria later became the Narrow Boat before it burned down.
Wedlake Street Baths In a time when most had somewhere to live but few had somewhere to wash at home, public baths were the place to go...
Western Arms The Western Arms was a pub situated on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Kensal Road.
William Miller's Yard William Miller's Yard stood in Chapel Place, West Row.

NEARBY STREETS
Absalom Road, W10 Absalom Road was the former name for the western section of Golborne Gardens.
Adair Road, W10 Adair Road is a street on the Kensal Town/North Kensington borders.
Adair Tower, W10 Adair Tower is a post-war tower block on the corner of Adair Road and Appleford Road, W10.
Adela Street, W10 Adela Street is a small cul-de-sac in Kensal Town.
Admiral Mews, W10 Admiral Mews is a small road off Barlby Road, W10.
Alderson Street, W10 Alderson Street is a side street north of Kensal Road.
Alperton Street, W10 Alperton Street is the first alphabetically named street in the Queen’s Park Estate, W10.
Appleford House, W10 Appleford House is a residential block along Appleford Road.
Appleford Road, W10 Appleford Road was transformed post-war from a Victorian street to one dominated by housing blocks.
Athlone Place, W10 Athlone Place runs between Faraday Road and Bonchurch Road.
Barlby Gardens, W10 Barlby Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Barlby Road, W10 Barlby Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Bonchurch Road, W10 Bonchurch Road was first laid out in the 1870s.
Bosworth Road, W10 Bosworth Road was the first street built as Kensal New Town started to expand to the east.
Branstone Street, W10 Branstone Street, originally Bramston Street, disappeared in 1960s developments.
Briar Walk, W10 Briar Walk lies on the Queen's Park Estate
Bruce Close, W10 Bruce Close replaced the earlier Rackham Street in this part of W10.
Caird Street, W10 Caird Street is the ’C’ street on the Queen’s Park Estate
Canal Close, W10 Canal Close is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Canal Way, W10 Canal Way was built on the site of the Kensal Gas Works.
Conlan Street, W10 Conlan Street is one of the newer roads of Kensal Town.
Droop Street, W10 Droop Street is one of the main east-west streets of the Queen’s Park Estate.
East Row, W10 East Row is a road with a long history within Kensal Town.
Enbrook Street, W10 Enbrook Street is another street north of Harrow Road, W10 without a pub.
Exmoor Street, W10 Exmoor Street runs from Barlby Road to St Charles Square, W10
Faraday Road, W10 Faraday Road is one of the ’scientist’ roadnames of North Kensington.
Farrant Street, W10 Farrant Street is the missing link in the alphabetti spaghetti of the streetnames of the Queen’s Park Estate
Fifth Avenue, W10 Fifth Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Fourth Avenue, W10 Shalfleet Drive is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Galton Street, W10 Galton Street lies within the Queen’s Park Estate, W10.
Golborne Gardens, W10 Golborne Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Harrow Road, W10 Harrow Road is a main road through London W10.
Hawthorn Walk, W10 Queen's Park Estate
Hazlewood Crescent, W10 Hazlewood Crescent, much altered by 1970s redevelopment, is an original road of the area.
Hazlewood Tower, W10 Hazlewood Tower is a skyscraper in North Kensington, London W10.
Heather Walk, W10 Heather Walk lies in the Queen's Park Estate
Hewer Street, W10 Built as part of the St Charles’ estate in the 1870s, it originally between Exmoor Street to a former street called Raymede Street.
Hill Farm Road, W10 Hill Farm Road is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Humber Drive, W10 Humber Drive is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Huxley Street, W10 Huxley Street is the only street beginning with an H on the Queen’s Park Estate.
Ilbert Street, W10 Ilbert Street is the ’I’ street on the Queen’s Park Estate, W10
James House, W10 James House is a residential block in Appleford Road.
Kensal House, W10 Kensal House (1936), was designed to show off the power of gas and originally had no electricity at all.
Kensal Road, W10 Kensal Road, originally called Albert Road, is the heart of Kensal Town.
Ladbroke Grove, W10 Ladbroke Grove runs from Notting Hill in the south to Kensal Green in the north, and straddles the W10 and W11 postal districts.
Lavie Mews, W10 Lavie Mews, W10 was a mews connecting Portobello Road and Murchison Road.
Lionel Mews, W10 Lionel Mews was built around 1882 and probably disappeared in the 1970s.
Manchester Drive, W10 Manchester Drive is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Maple Walk, W10 Post war development on the Queen’s Park Estate created some plant-based street names.
Matthew Close, W10 Matthew Close is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Maxilla Walk, W10 Maxilla Walk is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Methwold Road, W10 Methwold Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Middle Row, W10 Middle Row is one of the original streets laid out as Kensal New Town.
Munro Mews, W10 Munro Mews is a part cobbled through road that connects Wornington Road and Wheatstone Road.
Murchison Road, W10 Murchison Road existed for just under 100 years.
Oakworth Road, W10 Oakworth Road dates from the 1920s when a cottage estate was built by the council.
Octavia House, W10 Octavia House on Southern Row was built in the late 1930s.
Orchard Close, W10 Orchard Close is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
PO Box 4 Shrewsbury Court is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
Porlock Street, W10 Bransford Street became Porlock Street before vanishing altogether.
Rackham Street, W10 Rackham Street is a road that disappeared from the streetscape of London W10 in 1951.
Raymede Street, W10 Raymede Street, after severe bomb damage in the area, disappeared after 1950.
Regent Street, NW10 Regent Street, otherwise an obscure side street is one of the oldest roads in Kensal Green.
Rendle Street, W10 Rendle Street ran from Murchison Road to Telford Road.
Ronan Walk, W10 Ronan Walk was one of the streets constructed in a 1970s build parallel to the Harrow Road.
Rootes Drive, W10 Rootes Drive is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Salters Road, W10 Salters Road lies on the site of an old playground.
Second Avenue, W10 Second Avenue is one of the streets of the Queen's Park Estate, W10
Shrewsbury Street, W10 Shrewsbury Street is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Southam House, W10 Southam House is situated on Adair Road.
Southam Street, W10 Southam Street was made world-famous in the photographs of Roger Mayne.
Southern Row, W10 Southern Row was originally South Row to match the other streets in the neighbourhood.
St Johns Terrace, W10 St Johns Terrace is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Sunbeam Crescent, W10 Sunbeam Crescent is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Sycamore Walk, W10 Queen's Park Estate
Telford Road, W10 Telford Road is one of the local streets named after prominent nineteenth century scientists.
Third Avenue, W10 Third Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Tollbridge Close, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Treverton Street, W10 Treverton Street, a street which survived post war redevelopment.
Warfield Road, NW10 Warfield Road is a street in Willesden.
Wedlake Street, W10 Wedlake Street arrived as the second wave of building in Kensal Town was completed.
Wellington Road, NW10 Wellington Road commemorates the Duke of Wellington.
West Row, W10 West Row, W10 began its life in the early 1840s.
Wheatstone Road, W10 Wheatstone Road was the former name of the eastern section of Bonchurch Road.
Wornington Road, W10 Wornington Road connected Golborne Road with Ladbroke Grove, though the Ladbroke end is now closed to through traffic.


Kensal Town

Soapsuds Island

Kensal New Town was built between the Grand Central Canal (which opened in 1801) and the Great Western Railway line (opening in 1837) in the 1840s.

Single-storey cottages with gardens suitable for drying clothes were the first buildings and Kensal Road, Middle Row, West Row, East Row and Southern Row all appeared between 1841 and 1851. The rows of cottages quickly degenerated into a slum, mainly due to overcrowding, industrialisation and pollution.

The area was dominated by the Western Gas Company and Kensal Cemetery, which provided work but did little to improve the environment. Women were primarily involved in laundry work giving the area its nickname of ‘Soapsuds Island’.

The area was isolated from the rest of London at a time when Portobello Lane (now Portobello Road) was a muddy track sometimes impassable in bad weather.

Cut off from the municipal authorities it was left to charities to attempt to alleviate the social and health problems.

At the beginning of the 20th century, the cottage laundry industry began to be replaced by larger mechanized concerns.

In 1902 Charles Booth described it as, “Just as full of children and poverty as was the old woman’s dwelling in the nursery rhyme.” By this date the area had been transferred to the newly formed Royal Borough of Kensington. When the Piggeries and Potteries in Notting Dale were finally cleared in the early 20th century most of the displaced residents moved north into Golborne ward and Kensal.

By 1923 in the Southam Street area 140 houses contained some 2500 inhabitants. A series of evocative photographs by Roger Mayne in the 1950s showed that little had changed. It was only from the 1960s that the overcrowded and dilapidated terraces were cleared and replaced by social housing including Goldfinger’s Trellick Tower.


LOCAL PHOTOS
St Charles Hospital
TUM image id: 1079
Jack of Newbury
TUM image id: 1080

TUM image id: 1151
Chapel Place, W10
TUM image id: 1171
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