The Underground Map


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Wimbledon ·
MARCH
29
2020
The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.


In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Merton Road, SW19
Merton Road has connected Merton High Street to Wimbledon since the 18th century. The name Merton dates from the 10th Century, and means ’farmstead by the pool’.

The road formed the western boundary of the 160 acre Merton Place estate. In 1801, Horatio Nelson separated from his wife Fanny. His mistress, Emma, Lady Hamilton found Merton Place situated next to the Wandle River. Lord Nelson paid £9000 for it in 1803.

After his death, Nelson left Merton and its contents to Emma, but within three years, her mounting debts caused her to sell it.

After standing empty for many years, the estate was eventually auctioned ’into lots adequate for detached villas’ in 1823. It was finally pulled down in 1846 - no attempt was made to save it for the nation.

Merton Road became a mix of residential and commercial.

Just after the dawn of the 20th century, Wimbledon entertainment venues were lining Merton Road: the Apollo Electric Theatre (the first cinema in the area), the Wimbledon Theatre and King’s Palace Theatre.

»more



 

Featured articles

MARCH
4
2020

 

Merton Road, SW19
Merton Road has connected Merton High Street to Wimbledon since the 18th century. The name Merton dates from the 10th Century, and means ’farmstead by the pool’.

The road formed the western boundary of the 160 acre Merton Place estate. In 1801, Horatio Nelson separated from his wife Fanny. His mistress, Emma, Lady Hamilton found Merton Place situated next to the Wandle River. Lord Nelson paid £9000 for it in 1803.

After his death, Nelson left Merton and its contents to Emma, but within three years, her mounting debts caused her to sell it.

After standing empty for many years, the estate was eventually auctioned ’into lots adequate for detached villas’ in 1823. It was finally pulled down in 1846 - no attempt was made to save it for the nation.

Merton Road became a mix of residential and commercial.

Just after the dawn of the 20th century, Wimbledon entertainment venues were lining Merton Road: the Apollo Electric Theatre (the first cinema in the area), the Wimbledon Theatre and King’s Palace Theatre.
»read full article


MARCH
3
2020

 

Wimbledon
Wimbledon is home to the Wimbledon Tennis Championships and New Wimbledon Theatre, and contains Wimbledon Common, one of the largest areas of common land in London. The residential area is split into two sections known as the village and the town, with the High Street being part of the original medieval village, and the town being part of the modern development since the building of the railway station.

Wimbledon has been inhabited since at least the Iron Age when the hill fort on Wimbledon Common is thought to have been constructed. In 1087 when the Domesday Book was compiled, Wimbledon was part of the manor of Mortlake. The ownership of the manor of Wimbledon changed between various wealthy families many times during its history, and the area also attracted other wealthy families who built large houses such as Eagle House, Wimbledon House and Warren House. The village developed with a stable rural population coexisting alongside nobility and wealthy merchants from the city. In the 18th century the Dog and Fox public house became a stop on the stagecoach run from London to Portsmouth, then in 1838 the London and Sout...
»more


MARCH
2
2020

 

Macfarlane Place, W12
Macfarlane Place - a road with two lifetimes. Macfarlane Place began its life as a farm track which ran from Wood Lane to Old Oak Farm.

Supported by the Metropolitan Railway and the Great Western Railway, the Hammersmith & City Railway was built from the GWR’s main line a mile west of Paddington station to Shepherd’s Bush and Hammersmith. Built on viaduct largely across open fields, the line opened on 13 June 1864.

The viaduct crossed the farm track but as at did so, Macfarlane Place was created between it and Wood Lane.

After a 60 year hiatus, Macfarlane Place then became a new pedestrian-only street which cut through the BBC Television Centre car park after the Centre was redeveloped.
»read full article


MARCH
1
2020

 

Barge House Street, SE1
Barge House Street is a renamed section of Upper Ground Street. Old Barge House Stairs once marked the outflow of a stream - though more an open sewer which ran in a wide loop.

Embankment walls were build along the river bank at Upper Ground and sewers carried off water either to the river or south to St George’s Fields. Until 1809, when the Surrey and Kent Sewer Commission obtained permission to build new main sewers, the whole area was subject to flooding whenever there was an exceptionally high tide and most of the ground was too marshy for building.

However, from at least as early as the 14th century there was a fringe of houses along Upper Ground.

Sometime before 1420 the land was farmed out to John, Duke of Bedford. In 1655, William Angell, a grocer from London, bought the area for £500. The land comprised ’ten messuages, eighty cottages, twenty tofts, twenty gardens, twenty orchards, ten acres of land, fifty acres of meadow, thirty acres of pasture and one acre of woodland’. A large part ...
»more


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