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JUNE
21
2024
The Underground Map is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying within the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post-war megapolis we know today.

The aim of the project is to find the location every street in London, whether past or present. You are able to see each street on a present day map and also spot its location on older maps.

There's a control which looks like a 'pile of paper' at the top right of the map above. You can use it to see how an area has changed on a series of historic maps.

JUNE
30
2022

 

University of East London
The University of East London (UEL) is located in the London Borough of Newham, based at three campuses in Stratford and the Docklands. The University was first opened at University Square Stratford in September 2013. It began as the West Ham Technical Institute, that opening in 1898 after approval was given for construction by the West Ham Technical Instruction Act Committee in 1892. It gained university status in 1992.

The Docklands Campus, opened in 1999, is the largest of the three campuses and at the Royal Albert Dock.

The campus was shortlisted for the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors’ Building of the Year in 2001.
»read full article


JUNE
29
2022

 

Royal Docks
The Royal Docks is an area in the London Borough of Newham in the London Docklands. The Royal Docks area - more correctly called the Royal Group of Docks - is named after three docks: the Royal Albert Dock, the Royal Victoria Dock and the King George V Dock. They are ’Royal’ being due to their naming after members of the royal family and not Crown ownership. The three docks once collectively formed the largest enclosed docks in the world, with a water area of nearly 250 acres - equivalent to the whole of central London from Hyde Park to Tower Bridge.

The docks were completed between 1855 and 1921 on riverside marshes in East Ham and West Ham. The Victoria and Albert docks were constructed to provide berths for large vessels that could not be accommodated further upriver. They were a great commercial success, specialising in the import and unloading of foodstuffs. There were rows of giant granaries and refrigerated warehouses being sited alongside the quays. They had a collective span of over 12 miles of quaysides serving hundreds of cargo a...
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JUNE
28
2022

 

Olde Kings Head
The Olde Kings Head pub originated in 1547 and later became the Sheesh restaurant. The Kings Head located on Chigwell High Road was constructed in the 17th century and extended in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. The building faces St Mary’s Church.

William Richard Fisher lists the venue as hosting the meetings of the Court of Attachments for the Forest of Waltham, from at least 1713 and possibly as early as 1630. The court dealt with matters arising in the forests in the area and gave verderers the power to fine offenders no more than the sum of £10.

In the 1820s, Mary Draper ran a daily coach service from the pub to Aldgate.

The Grade II* listed former pub was the inspiration for the Maypole Inn in Dickens’ novel Barnaby Rudge.

John Forster describes, in his 1875 book ’The Life of Charles Dickens’, a letter he received from the writer which in turn describes the King’s Head.

Dickens wrote: “Chigwell, my dear fellow, is the greatest place in the wor...
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JUNE
27
2022

 

George Inn
The George Inn is a public house established in the medieval period on Borough High Street in Southwark, owned and leased by the National Trust. Formerly known as the George and Dragon, the pub is the only surviving galleried London coaching inn. The building is partly timber framed and the ground floor is divided into a number of connected bars. The Parliament Bar used to be a waiting room for passengers on coaches.

In 1677, the pub was rebuilt after a serious fire that destroyed most of medieval Southwark. In the nineteenth century, the Great Northern Railway used the George Inn as a depot and pulled down two of its fronts to build warehousing. Only the south face remains. The White Hart was immediately to the north and The Tabard (described in Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales) immediately to the south. Both were demolished in the nineteenth century.

Charles Dickens visited and referred to it in both Little Dorrit and Our Mutual Friend.

The building is listed Grade I on the National Heritage List for England.
»read full article


JUNE
26
2022

 

Eltham Street, SE17
Eltham Street was once part of the most densely populated part of London with no open space at all and counting 249 people per acre in St Johns Ward. In 1776 James Maddock and his wife moved to Walworth setting up the Walworth Garden. Immediately to the south was John Bendel’s Montpelier Tea Gardens with about five acres of ’trees, shrubs and other plants’. In 1792 the Florist’s Directory by James Maddock, Florist at Walworth was published. In 1798 Maddock moved and the nursery passed into the hands of his rich relatives, Goring & Wright.

Nursery Row thus gained its name having been called after a Walworth nursery.

Land to the south of Nursery Row was vacant until the 1850s when Eltham Street was built.

East Street Recreation Grounds was established around 1885. In 1897, the Metropolitan Public Gardens Association spent £1000 on planting and laying out a park. In time this became known as Nursery Row Park.

As part of a policy of “slum clearance” of traditional terraced housing in the borough of Southwark, Eltham Street came to its end i...
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JUNE
25
2022

 

East Street Market
East Street Market (sometimes known locally as ’The Lane’ or ’East Lane’) is a street market in Walworth. Originally the area through which East Street now runs was rural fields and Walworth Common was where people could graze their animals. There had been street trading in Walworth since the 16th century when Kent and Surrey farmers rested their livestock on the common before continuing to the city. People would buy produce directly from these drovers and eventually a market was established.

By the 1770s, land near the junction with Old Kent Road was cultivated as a flower nursery by the Driver family who were also responsible for commissioning the buildings at nearby Surrey Square. A legal document from 1780 describes the sale of the land which led to the creation of East Street as a public highway. In the 1860s, Walworth Common was developed.

The area to the north was known as ‘Lock’s Field’ and in 1878 it was still described as little more than ‘a dreary swamp’. Conditions improved and four years later it was recorded as a site for ...
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JUNE
24
2022

 

Goldhawk Road, W12
Goldhawk Road is a main road in West London, which starts at Shepherd’s Bush and runs west. Goldhawk Road’s name derives from one John Goldhawk, who in the late 14th century held extensive estates in Fulham.

Goldhawk Road was of little note until the mid-seventeenth century, when a cottage on the street became the home of one Miles Sindercombe, a disgruntled Roundhead who in 1657 made several attempts to assassinate Oliver Cromwell. Sindercombe planned to ambush the Lord Protector using a specially built machine with muskets fixed to a frame. His plan failed, Sindercombe was sentenced to death, and his cottage was eventually demolished in the 1760s.

A map of London dated 1841 shows Goldhawk Road forming the southern boundary of Shepherd’s Bush Green. At that time Shepherd’s Bush was still largely undeveloped and chiefly rural in character, with much open farmland compared to fast-developing Hammersmith, and several ponds or small lakes. Scattered buildings are shown, mostly lining the main thoroughfares of Wood Lane, Cumberland...
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JUNE
23
2022

 

Pentonville Road, N1
Pentonville Road connects Kings Cross and the Angel, Islington. Pentonville Road, renamed in 1857 after the new town of Pentonville, was originally built in the mid-18th century as part of the New Road, a bypass of Central London designed for coach traffic. Numerous factories and commercial premises were established on the road in the 19th and 20th centuries, particularly after the arrival of railways in the 1840s.

The road was designed as an integral part of Pentonville, a new suburb named after landowner Henry Penton. It was situated away from the city and became a local hub for manufacturing. There was a debate over the final route of the road - the original plan running through and owned by the Skinners Company and the New River Company was rejected in favour of the route further north via Battle Bridge.

After completion in 1756, the route now covered by Pentonville Road was largely fields, with Battle Bridge occupying the space where King’s Cross now is. The road’s route included a tavern known as Bu...
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JUNE
22
2022

 

Lyric Hammersmith
The Lyric Theatre (Lyric Hammersmith) is a theatre off King Street, Hammersmith. The Lyric Theatre was originally a music hall established in 1888 on Bradmore Grove. Its success led it to being rebuilt and enlarged on the same site twice in 1890 and 1895. The 1895 reopening, as The New Lyric Opera House and designed by theatrical architect Frank Matcham, was accompanied by an address by the actress Lillie Langtry.

In 1966 the theatre was due to be closed and demolished but a successful campaign to save it led to the auditorium being dismantled and reinstalled piece by piece within a modern shell on its current site on King Street a short distance from the former location. The relocated theatre opened in 1979.
»read full article


JUNE
21
2022

 

High Barnet - Totteridge walk
This walk takes in the top of the Northern Line. High Barnet is a London Underground station and, in the past, a railway station, located in Chipping Barnet. It is the terminus of the High Barnet branch of the Northern line and is the start of a walk which takes us on to Totteridge and Whetstone station.

High Barnet station was an idea of the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway and was opened on 1 April 1872 by the Great Northern Railway which had taken over by then. It was situated on one of the original sites of the Barnet Fair and was the terminus of the branch line that ran from Finsbury Park via Highgate.

The section north of East Finchley was incorporated into the London Underground network because of the Northern Heights project begun in the late 1930s. High Barnet station was served by Northern line trains from 14 April 1940 onwards.

The station retains much of its original Victorian architectural character, with some platform buildings dating from the pre-London Transport era.»more


JUNE
20
2022

 

Hammersmith Broadway, W6
Hammersmith Broadway is a major transport node and also the name of a shopping centre. Hammersmith Broadway stretches from the junction of Queen Caroline Street and King Street in the west to the junction of Hammersmith Road and Butterwick in the east.

The Hammersmith Flyover was built in 1961 through the Broadway area. The resulting gyratory is one of London’s busiest traffic junctions.

The shopping centre opened in 1994, on the site of many demolished buildings, including The Clarendon Hotel and Palmers Department Store.
»read full article


JUNE
19
2022

 

Sacred Heart High School
Sacred Heart High School is a Roman Catholic girls secondary school in Hammersmith. The school was founded by nuns of the Society of the Sacred Heart in 1893 and one of the school buildings is named after the order’s founder Madeleine Sophie Barat.

It is built on a site with a long Catholic tradition dating to 1609. In 1869 Archbishop Manning decided to convert the convent into a seminary but the original buildings were found to be unsuitable. By January 1876 John Francis Bentley, the architect of Westminster Cathedral, had completed the plans for the current Tudor styled buildings. By July 1884 the seminary was complete, consisting of a chapel, library, school, refectory, common room and upwards of sixty study bedrooms for staff and students.

In 1948 the convent school was reorganised as a secondary grammar school - the Convent of Sacred Heart High School - until 1976. The school received its first comprehensive intake in 1976, gradually becoming comprehensive one year at a time until 1981, as the ’London Sacred Heart High S...
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JUNE
18
2022

 

Hammersmith
Hammersmith is a district in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, approximately eight kilometres west of Charing Cross on the north bank of the River Thames. One of west London’s key transport hubs and commercial and employment centres, and home to several multinational company offices, Hammersmith is focused on the two London Underground stations, a bus station and as an important road network node.

Hammersmith’s pedestrianised riverside is popular for its many pubs, its excellent views of the river and the annual Oxford-Cambridge Boat Race which passes by.

The area has provided a location for several TV programmes - for instance, The Flying Squad were Hammersmith-based in the 1970s TV series The Sweeney.

Hammersmith is served by two tube stations, one is the western terminus of the Hammersmith & City Line, the other by the Piccadilly and District Lines. Both are called Hammersmith. The latter tube station is part of a larger office, retail and transport development, locally known as The Broadway after its large encompassing roundabout.

The present Ham...
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JUNE
17
2022

 

Latymer Court, W6
Latymer Court, when opened, was the largest block of flats of its type in the country. Latymer Court opened in 1934 and boasted the “most modern style and built-in amenities”.

Then the largest single luxury block of flats in Europe, the position of the site meant that the architects - Gordon Jeeves of Hanover Square - could plan the flats to obtain an abundance of light. The black had commanding views over what were then the playing fields of Colet Court. The original publicity brochure claimed “Latymer Court is the Largest Single Block of Flats which has been erected in Europe. It has been designed in the most Modern Style to provide 360 Flats in a position of unique accessibility with every refinement so as to afford the maximum of comfort combined with the minimum of labour at a most favourable rental”.

The Hammersmith Road elevation of the building is 52 windows wide, but subdivided visually into six bays. It is eight storeys high, with a 9th storey on the forward projecting end bays. The ground floor of the Hammersmith R...
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JUNE
16
2022

 

Old Montague Street, E1
Old Montague Street is a thoroughfare running east-west from Baker’s Row (now Vallance Road) to Brick Lane. The western section of the street (as far as today’s Greatorex Street) was certainly in evidence by the 1670s (known simply as Montague Street) and was probably built up when the east side of Brick Lane was being developed in the 1650s. Much of the north side was rural at this time, however, with the south side comprising of scattered properties and gardens.

This state of affairs appeared to exist into the mid-18th century - the street was extended eastwards by this time but the newer pathways were as yet unnamed.

By the beginning of the 19th century, these easterly extentions were known as Rope Walk (later Chapel Lane) and Princes Row. This part eventually became Princes Street.

To the south of Princes Street was the Whitechapel Workhouse, built on Whitechapel Road by 1827 and abutting this was a burial ground, originally an overspill for St Mary Matfelon. Adjacent to the workhouse was the Davenant Foundation School which had been...
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JUNE
15
2022

 

St Mary’s (Whitechapel Road)
St Mary’s was a station on the Metropolitan Railway and the District Railway lines, located between Whitechapel and Aldgate East stations. St Mary’s was opened on 3 March 1884 as St. Mary’s (Whitechapel) by the Metropolitan and Metropolitan District Joint Railway.

This initial service was withdrawn on 1 October 1884 and one week later the services were taken over jointly by the Metropolitan Railway and the District Railway. The station was located very close to both Aldgate East and Whitechapel stations.

In 1938, Aldgate East station was relocated further east and its new entrance was to be only a few hundred metres from St Mary’s. Therefore the latter was permanently closed after the final train on 30 April 1938 in advance of the opening of the relocated Aldgate East.

During the Second World War, the station site was leased from London Transport by the Metropolitan Borough of Stepney for use as an air raid shelter.

The structure was demolished after the war and there is little evidence of the station’s existence. The bricked-up platform...
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JUNE
14
2022

 

Plough and Harrow
The Plough and Harrow was situated on Heathrow Road between the junctions of Cain’s Lane and High Tree Lane. In the 1930s it was run by a Mr Basham, an ex-policeman.

It was demolished in 1944.

Its site is possibly one of the most altered locations in the London area - you can visit the location by walking to the location of WH Smith in Terminal 2, Heathrow.
»read full article


JUNE
13
2022

 

Sunshine Way, CR4
Sunshine Way is the name of a crescent in Mitcham, built in 1936 for families from overcrowded areas of inner London. The houses date from a period of growing awareness of the link between bad housing and health problems. Sunshine Way consisted of 51 mostly three bedroom houses.

The development included specially-designed houses to suit the needs of tuberculosis patients and the name Sunshine Way referred to the six special ’sunshine’ houses for people with TB. Each house had a patio area in the roof where a resident could spend the night in the open air - fresh air was considered an important part of prevention and treatment before effective drugs were developed.

The site for Sunshine Way was bought by Church Army Housing Ltd and the total cost including building the houses and also a community hall came to £31 000. The housing estate was officially opened on 20 November 1936 by Lord Horder and was blessed by the Bishop of Kingston.
»read full article


JUNE
12
2022

 

Acton Town
Acton Town station was opened as Mill Hill Park on 1 July 1879 by the District Railway (now the District line). It remained as a terminus until on 1 May 1883 and 23 June 1903 the District Railway opened two branches from Acton Town to Hounslow Town and Park Royal & Twyford Abbey respectively.

On 4 July 1932 the Piccadilly line was extended to Acton Town. District line services to both the Hounslow and Uxbridge branches were withdrawn completely on 9 and 10 October 1964 after which operations were provided by the Piccadilly line alone.

The original brick-built station was built in 1879 and in February 1910 the station building was reconstructed.

On 1 March 1910 the station was given its present name.

In 1931 and 1932 the station was rebuilt again in preparation for transferring the Uxbridge branch service from the District line to the Piccadilly line.

The new station was designed by Charles Holden in a modern European geometric style using brick, reinforced concrete and glass.
»read full article


JUNE
11
2022

 

Queen Street, EC4R
Queen Street is a street in the City of London which runs between Upper Thames Street and Cheapside. It is split between two postcode areas - EC4N and EC4R.

The thoroughfares of Queen Street and King Street (a northward continuation of Queen Street beyond Cheapside) were newly laid out, cutting across more ancient routes in the City, following the Great Fire of London in 1666; they were the only notable new streets following the fire’s destruction of much of the City.

At the lower (southern) end of Queen Street is Southwark Bridge. The London Chamber of Commerce & Industry is located at No. 33. At the upper (northern) end the street crosses Cheapside and becomes King Street, which leads to Gresham Street and the Guildhall. This creates a direct route from the River Thames at Southwark Bridge up to the Guildhall. Queen Street meets the newer Queen Victoria Street as well as Cannon Street. Minor roads off the street include Skinners Lane (the home of the Worshipful Company of Skinners) and Cloak Lane.

Two short sections of the street a...
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JUNE
10
2022

 

Prescot Street, E1
Prescot Street was named for Rebecca Prescott, wife of William Leman. Prescot Street was originally Great Prescott Street and ran along the south of Goodman’s Fields.

The road was developed for good-quality housing and it became one of the earliest London streets to have numbered buildings (rather than signs). An early resident, before he moved to Soho Square, was the ’rough old admiral’ Sir Cloudesley Shovel.

From the late nineteenth century there was a synagogue in the street, and between 1857 and 1880 the Jewish Widows’ Home Asylum. In the early twentieth century the Association for the Protection of Women and Girls ran a refuge for young girls arriving in London who were deemed at risk from pimps and procurers.

Little Prescot Street was the continuation of Mansell Street, running from the western end of Great Prescot Street to Royal Mint Street; its original name was Rosemary Branch Alley.
»read full article


JUNE
9
2022

 

Powis Square, W11
Powis Square is a square between Talbot Road and Colville Terrace. The area surrounding All Saints church was sold by Rev Walker in 1860 to the builder George Tippett and consequently became known as Tippett’s Brick Fields. The Powis and Colville squares were built by Tippett in the 1860s as upper-middle class residences, but are said to have gone into an immediate social decline. By the 1880s some were already sub-divided into flats.

Tippett went bankrupt and the estate was acquired by Edward Strutt and Hickman Bacon, who formed the Colville Estate Limited. However, on Charles Booth’s 1900s poverty map the Colville squares are still solidly well-to-do orange. The ward on the whole is a pretty even mix of wealthy, well-to-do, fairly comfortable, poverty and comfort mixed, moderate poverty and very poor.

Powis Square’s multicultural reputation was established at the turn of the 20th century by ’the Wren College’ for the Indian civil service, and the accompanying boarding houses ’occupi...
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JUNE
8
2022

 

Chilworth Street, W2
Chilworth Street, originally called Charles Street, is an east-west street in W2. Chilworth Street runs from Eastbourne Terrace beside Paddington station to Cleveland Square in the west.

The land of the Hyde Park area, including the River Westbourne, formed the Saxon agricultural lands of Eia, which, in 1086, was bequeathed by Geoffrey de Mandeville to Westminster Abbey. The land to the north of the former Eia estates was owned by the Bishops of London. Paddington was a small settlement around a central green (Paddington Green).

Little further urbanisation took place until the 1790s when there were estimated to be only 340 houses in the parish. Most of the area was given over to grassland, providing grass and hay for the dairy farmers who supplied London with milk.

Rapid development occurred in the early 19th century with housing spreading into the area from built-up areas to the south and east. Development was further sped up with the construction of the Grand Union Canal between 1801 and 1805.

The first...
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JUNE
7
2022

 

Lowndes Street, SW1X
Lowndes Street was built by Thomas Cubitt and Seth Smith. Before Lowndes Street was developed, the area hereabouts and north up to Hyde Park was originally known as Five Fields. The Knightsbridge (Knight’s Bridge) section was a main route out of the city, a renowned spot for bandits.

In 1824, Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster commissioned the development of many buildings centred around Belgrave Square and Pimlico. The man he commissioned to develop this area was Thomas Cubitt, a builder from Norfolk and a partner, Seth Smith.

Lowndes Street was developed from 1836 as part of the Cadogan Estate, also by Thomas Cubitt and Seth Smith. It was once part of the estate of William Lowndes of Chesham, after whom it is named.
»read full article


JUNE
6
2022

 

Bourne Terrace, W2
Bourne Terrace is part of the Warwick Estate in Paddington and has 38 properties. The Warwick Estate began to be developed around 1959, tearing down the Victorian streetscape.

Bourne Terrace, previously Westbourne Terrace North at the western end and Westbourne Square in the east, lies to the north of Westbourne Green.

There are lots of local amenities in the area including a number of grocery shops, a large sports complex and gymnastics club.
»read full article


JUNE
5
2022

 

Wilson Grove, SE16
Wilson Grove was a renaming of Salisbury Street. The former Salisbury Street was reimagined as Wilson Grove as part of Bermondsey Garden Suburb. Salisbury Street was already on the 1750s Rocque map, so is quite old.

The Labour party came to power in Bermondsey during 1922 and sought to raise the conditions of the people "by all means possible". Two principal figures were husband and wife team Dr Alfred Salter and Ada Salter who had joined the Independent Labour Party in 1908, convinced that socialism could fulfil their Christian idealism and transform the conditions of the people among whom they lived.

The first test of the new council was the clearance of a notorious area of condemned housing in Salisbury Street where four acres housed 1300 people.

Instead of tenements, a small estate of 54 cottages was proposed - ‘trim structures of warm, red brick, some with bay windows, others with recessed doorways, sheltered by an arched doorway’. Each cottage would have three bedrooms, a li...
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JUNE
4
2022

 

Lawns Court, HA9
An Art Deco block, Lawns Court was built in 1933 on the site of the Holland & Holland shooting club. Lawns Court in Wembley is six moderne-style low rise apartment blocks. There are 50 flats in total, designed by Welch, Lander & Day for the Haymills company.

Each block has lawns in front and both communal and private gardens behind. The top floor flats have roof terraces, which originally, when opened in 1933, had pergolas.

It succeeded the Holland & Holland shooting club on the site. Harris Holland, its founder, was a keen shot and a live pigeon shooter. Harris Holland frequented gun clubs such as the Hornsey Wood Tavern and the Hurlingham Club in Fulham. Harris made excellent connections amongst their wealthy members, supplying shooters with their live pigeon guns and accessories.

Holland opened a shooting club here in 1913 but moved again in 1930 to Northwood.
»read full article


JUNE
3
2022

 

Chippenham Mews, W9
Chippenham Mews lies behind Harrow Road running from Chippenham Road to Marylands Road. In 1865, the name St Peter’s Park was given to a projected suburb north of Harrow Road. A few straight avenues leading from Harrow Road were planned - Malvern Road (soon renamed Chippenham) Road, an extension of Elgin Road, St Peter’s Road (renamed Walterton Road) and the southernmost stretch of the future Fernhead Road. To the west, part of Ashmore Road, had been begun.

The same year, landowner Sir John Neeld made the first 99 years lease (99 yrs) to Edward Vigers, a builder from Tavistock Lodge, Great Western Road. They were mostly for terraced houses of three storeys over a basement along the north side of Harrow Road, forming Chippenham Terrace, and in Marylands Road, and for two-storeyed houses in Chippenham Mews.

By 1869, there were houses along Chippenham Road and at the west ends of Elgin Road, Marylands Road, and Sutherland Gardens. All three roads led towards Shirland Road, which approximately followed the line of the Bayswater (West...
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JUNE
2
2022

 

East Lane, SE16
East Lane - formerly a single street - has been split postwar into two sections. East Lane originally ran from Neckinger to the River Thames at East Lane Stairs. It was an ancient thoroughfare and many of its first properties dated from before 1750.

Along the street was East Lane School, a London Council Council infant’s school now to the north of the current route of East Lane. Its site is now under St Michaels Roman Catholic School.

Peabody Dwellings was also along the road. This was an early concrete-built Peabody estate, demolished after the Second World War.
»read full article


JUNE
1
2022

 

The very first Crystal Palace FC
A football team was established at the Crystal Palace grounds leading to claims that Crystal Palace FC should be recognised as the oldest professional football club in the world. In 1854, the Crystal Palace Exhibition building was relocated from Hyde Park to Sydenham Hill. The Crystal Palace Park that surrounded the site saw various sports facilities built. The Crystal Palace Company who owned the exhibition building founded the Crystal Palace Club in 1857 to play cricket. They then turned their attention to football. It had been lobbied by members of the cricket club to provide a continuation of sporting activities during the winter months. The company formed an amateur Crystal Palace football club in 1861.

This club became one of the original founder members of the Football Association in 1863, In 1895, the Football Association found a new permanent venue for the FA Cup Final at the sports stadium. The final continued here until 1920.
»read full article


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