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(51.51924 -0.06724, 51.537 -0.211) 
MAP YEAR:175018001810182018301860190019502024 
Use the control in the top right of the map above to view this area on another historic map
 
JUNE
18
2024
The Underground Map is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying within the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post-war megapolis we know today.

The aim of the project is to find the location every street in London, whether past or present. You are able to see each street on a present day map and also spot its location on older maps.

There's a control which looks like a 'pile of paper' at the top right of the map above. You can use it to see how an area has changed on a series of historic maps.

FEBRUARY
28
2023

 

Essex Street, WC2R
Essex Street stretches from Milford Lane in the south to Strand in the north, flanked by Little Essex Street on the west and Devereux Court on the east. Essex Street - laid out by Nicholas Barbon between 1675 and 1680 - boasts several listed buildings and has played a role in various aspects of London’s history.

The street’s origins trace back to the former Essex House, situated on the grounds of the Outer Temple once owned by the Knights Templar. In the 17th century, highwayman Tom Cox, who met his fate at Tyburn in 1691, was captured in St Clement Danes churchyard after being spotted leaving his lodgings in Essex Street by one of his victims.

During the early 20th century, Essex Street gained prominence for housing publishers’ offices, including Chapman & Hall and Methuen & Co. Macmillan, situated at 4 Little Essex Street until 1990. The Roman Catholic journal Merry England, published from 43 Essex Street, further contributed to the street’s literary associations.

Essex Hall, an office building at numbers 1 to 6, serves as the headquarters of the British Unitarians...
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FEBRUARY
27
2023

 

Campbell Road, N4
Campbell Road, or "The Bunk" - was known as the worst street in London. Campbell Road had a bad reputation from the moment it was built in 1865, on land known as the St Pancras’ Seven Sisters Road Estate. It was a long street just to the west of Fonthill Road, off Seven Sisters. Building along the street was done piecemeal and took a long time. Over susequent years, the demand fell and poor people - unable to afford to buy or rent a whole house - started taking rooms in the properties.

In 1880, the first lodging house opened at 47 Campbell Road, licensed for 90 men. This marked the beginning of numerous similar establishments in the area. By 1890, Campbell Road had the highest number of doss house beds on any Islington street. The residents, facing extreme poverty and overcrowded conditions, often spilled onto the streets. The area gained notoriety for its dire conditions, with inhabitants resorting to selling window glass and the police avoiding the neighbourhood due to its lawlessness. It became a hub for career criminals, marked b...
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FEBRUARY
26
2023

 

Park Lane, W1K
Park Lane has several historically significant properties and is one of the most desirable streets in London. Originally, Park Lane started as a rustic lane along the boundary of Hyde Park, separated by a brick wall. In the late 18th century, aristocratic residences such as Breadalbane House, Somerset House and Londonderry House emerged.

During the 19th century, improvements to Hyde Park Corner and more accessible views of the park increased the road’s popularity. This led to Park Lane becoming one of London’s most fashionable addresses, attracting the nouveau riche. Prominent residents included the 1st Duke of Westminster at Grosvenor House, the Dukes of Somerset at Somerset House, and Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli at No. 93. Other notable properties included Dorchester House, Brook House, and Dudley House.

In the 20th century, Park Lane gained renown for its luxury hotels, especially The Dorchester, completed in 1931, which became synonymous with eminent writers and international film stars. Over time, flats, shops and penthouses began to appear...
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FEBRUARY
25
2023

 

Vere Street, WC2B
Vere Street was a street in the Lincoln’s Inn Fields area Vere Street was situated between Clare Market at its eastern end and Duke Street (which, via Prince’s Street, connected to Drury Lane) at its western end.

It is best known for Gibbon’s Tennis Court and the Vere Street Coterie.

The area was unaffected by the Great Fire of London. The decrepit Elizabethan buildings survived until the area was redeveloped by the London County Council at the beginning of the twentieth century. Vere Street was then demolished as part of the Aldwych/Kingsway “improvement scheme”
»read full article


FEBRUARY
24
2023

 

Dartmouth Street, SW1H
Dartmouth Street leads north from Tothill Street and dates from the seventeenth century. Dartmouth Street was named for both Admiral George Legge, 1st Earl of Dartmouth, and William Legge, Lord Privy Seal in the 1710s.

Admiral George Legge was one of James II’s principal advisers and a kinsman of the powerful Villiers family which influenced all the Stuart sovereigns. His townhouse was a mansion in Tothill Street with grounds stretching back to St James’s Park. It was demolished in 1683 to make way for Dartmouth  Street. In 1673, he also purchased the country manor of Lewisham: hence Lewisham Street, an offshoot of Dartmouth Street, and Dartmouth Grove, Hill and Row and Legge Street in Lewisham.

In 1755 George’s  great-grandson William, the 2nd Earl of Dartmouth acquired by marriage land at Kentish Town and Highgate. The Kentish Town field was developed in the 1860s by the 5th Earl, who employed as his land agent John Eeles Lawford, a local Churchwarden and slate merchant, the founder of  Lawford and Sons, builders&rsquo...
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FEBRUARY
22
2023

 

Tradescant Road, SW8
John Tradescant’s botanical garden, which is now commemorated by Tradescant Road, was established in the 17th century. John Tradescant the Elder (1570-1638), father of John Tradescant the Younger, was an English naturalist, gardener and collector.

He accumulated a diverse collection of curiosities in natural history and ethnography from his travels. Tradescant housed this collection in a large house called "The Ark" located in South Lambeth from about the 1620s onwards. The Ark served as a prototypical "Cabinet of Curiosity," essentially a precursor to museums, and it became the first museum open to the public in England, known as the Musaeum Tradescantianum.

During his voyages, Tradescant acquired specimens through various means, including interactions with American colonists. Notably, his personal friend John Smith, who also had connections to the American colonies, bequeathed a quarter of his library to Tradescant. The botanical garden associated with The Ark, played a significant role in introducing many plants into English gardens. This contribution has left a lastin...
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FEBRUARY
21
2023

 

Beaufoy Vinegar Works
The Beaufoy Vinegar Works stood at the top of Old South Lambeth Road. The Beaufoy family, renowned for their vinegar-making business, had established a prominent position in Vauxhall since 1741. Rejecting the distillation of gin due to its harmful effects, the Beaufoys became major producers of English malt vinegar. Over the years, their business expanded to include a variety of products such as cordials, non-alcoholic drinks and mineral water.

In 1812, John Henry Beaufoy relocated his vinegar brewery from Cuper’s Gardens to South Lambeth. The move was prompted by the need for the Cuper’s Gardens site for the construction of the new Strand Bridge, later known as Waterloo Bridge. John Henry Beaufoy received significant compensation for the relocation, making the transition financially viable.

Amidst the industrialisation of Vauxhall in the mid-19th century, the Beaufoy family played a philanthropic role by providing educational facilities for the underprivileged. Henry Benjamin Beaufoy built and endowed the Ragg...
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FEBRUARY
20
2023

 

Scarsdale Villas, W8
Scarsdale Villas was built between 1850 and 1864. Scarsdale Villas runs roughly west to east from Earls Court Road to Marloes Road, with crossroads at Abingdon Road and Allen Street en route.

Initially popular with artists, the musician and comedian Michael Flanders lived there - his problems with getting safely out of his car in a wheelchair forms the introduction to the song ’The Gnu’. The satirist and cartoonist Willie Rushton was living in Scarsdale Villas by 1961, and in his bedroom there, the first issue of ’Private Eye’ was created.

Foxley Road became Scarsdale Villas in 1874.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
19
2023

 

Saffron Hill, EC1M
Saffron Hill’s name derives the time that it was part of an estate on which saffron grew. Saffron Hill formed part of the liberty of Saffron Hill, Hatton Garden, Ely Rents and Ely Place which became part of the County of London in 1889. It was abolished in 1900 and formed part of the Metropolitan Borough of Holborn until 1965.

In 1850 it was described as a squalid neighbourhood, the home of paupers and thieves. In Charles Dickens’s 1837 novel Oliver Twist (Chapter 8), the Artful Dodger leads Oliver to Fagin’s den in Field Lane, the southern extension of Saffron Hill: "a dirty and more wretched place he (Oliver) had never seen. The street was very narrow and muddy, and the air was impregnated with filthy odours".

Saffron Hill is mentioned in the Arthur Conan Doyle Sherlock Holmes story "The Adventure of the Six Napoleons", as the Italian Quarter where the Venucci family can be found.

Saffron Hill has become more residential in recent years with the building of several blocks of ’luxury’ apartments, includi...
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FEBRUARY
18
2023

 

Keston
Keston is a village situated in Greater London, within the London Borough of Bromley. Before 1965, Keston belonged to the historic county of Kent.

The village has a blend of suburban and rural characteristics and is positioned on the outskirts of Hayes Common, just south of Bromley Common, extending beyond the London conurbation. Keston encompasses the hamlet of Nash to the southwest.

Nearby Keston Park is an exclusive gated community that spans around 140 acres and comprises approximately 200 residential properties. The community is situated on land that was once part of the Holwood Estate owned by the Earl of Derby. Notably, former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and her husband Denis lived in Keston Park, where they raised their children.

The nearest railway station to Keston is Hayes, the terminus of the Hayes line, and to the north-west.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
17
2023

 

Bangor Street, W11
Bangor Street was situated on the site of the modern Henry Dickens Court. Originally called George Street, it was the most notorious road of the Notting Dale ‘Special Area’ slum.

It was more colloquially known as ‘Do as you like Street’, a place where ‘no one left their door closed’, and the venue of the Rag Fair. At the turn of the 20th century, the local district nurses were reported "valiantly holding their own in spite of the disturbance caused by nightly brawls and the noisy and unsavoury Sunday markets."

Valerie Wilson recalled in an interview by the Notting Dale Urban Studies group: “They used to threaten us – don’t go up rag fair and the first thing we did when we got outside, we forgot all about it and went straight through rag fair… that was really like a film show, they used to hang old bits of clothing on the railings… the street would throng with people… there was a group of men who came out the war and they were all ex-servicemen, big tall strong men, and they couldn’t...
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FEBRUARY
16
2023

 

Brady Street, E1
Brady Street is a road running north-south from Three Colts Lane to Whitechapel Road. Brady Street began its existence as Ducking Pond Lane, a short pathway to the ducking pond which stood at the junction with Ducking Pond Row (later Buck’s Row). By 1800 it had been renamed North Street and was extended northward as Upper North Street during the early 19th century.
The entire thoroughfare was renamed Brady Street on 7th May 1875.

Brady Street Dwellings were built on the western side of the street, to the north of Buck’s Row / Durward Street, in 1889-90. The buildings were demolished in 1979.

Much of Brady Street now consists of early-mid 20th century estates. Mocatta House was built in 1905 by the Four Per Cent Industrial Dwellings Company and was converted into flats in 1980. Much of the southern end is dominated by a Sainsbury’s superstore (1990s, new additions 2010) and Swanlea School (1994). The Roebuck public house, formerly a beershop, stood at No.27 at the corner with Durward Street and was demolished in 199...
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FEBRUARY
15
2023

 

Archway
Not only the name of a bridge, but a whole area of north London. When the tube station opened in 1907, the area was simply the northern end of Holloway Road and had no specific name. Most people referred either to Highgate, Islington or Upper Holloway, a name that is now used for little besides the nearby railway station and the post office. In the hope of attracting patronage, the terminus was originally named Highgate after the village up the hill.

At the time of the station’s construction the first cable car in Europe operated non-stop up Highgate Hill to the village from outside the Archway Tavern. It operated between 1884 and 1909, was a mile and a half long and powered by two steam engines housed in a building on the east side of Highgate High Street. Representatives of other towns and cities came to see the new method working. As a result Birmingham adopted the system for one of its steep hills.


The station was called Highgate station until 1939, subsequently Highgate (Archway), Archway (Highgate...
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FEBRUARY
14
2023

 

Café Royal
The Café Royal - now a five-star hotel at 68 Regent Street - was, before its conversion to a hotel, a notable restaurant. The Café Royal originated in 1865 through the efforts of Daniel Nicholas Thévenon, a French wine merchant who, after facing bankruptcy, sought refuge in Britain with his wife, Célestine, with only five pounds to his name. Adopting the name Daniel Nicols, he and later his wife successfully managed the café, earning it a reputation for possessing one of the world’s finest wine cellars.

By the 1890s, the Café Royal had become a social hub, attracting notable figures. A pivotal meeting occurred on 24 March 1895, when Frank Harris advised Oscar Wilde to withdraw his criminal libel charge against the Marquess of Queensberry. Wilde declined, leading to legal consequences. From 1951, the National Sporting Club called Café Royal home until its acquisition by David Locke in 1972.

In the early 21st century, Café Royal remained a venue for significant events. It closed its doors in December 2008, and its furnishings were auctioned. Subsequently, David Ch...
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FEBRUARY
13
2023

 

Piccadilly Arcade, SW1Y
Piccadilly Arcade runs between Piccadilly and Jermyn Street. Piccadilly Arcade was opened in 1909 and was designed by Thrale Jell. It was named after Piccadilly Hall, home of local tailor Robert Baker in the 17th century. Ultimately the name derives from the pickadils (collars/hem trimmings) which made Robert Baker’s fortune.

Piccadilly Arcade consists of twenty-eight shops on the ground floor. The first floor was originally offices, but converted to become the Felix Hotel in 1915. The buildings were bombed in 1941 and were not fully restored until 1957.

A bronze statue of Beau Brummell sits at the Jermyn Street end of the arcade. It was designed by Irena Sidiecka.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
12
2023

 

Perronet House, SE1
Perronet House is an 11-storey residential council tower block adjacent to the northern roundabout of the Elephant and Castle. In 1969, Sir Roger Walters received a commission from the Greater London Council to create a high-density block of social housing that would complement the existing high-rise structures dedicated to commercial, educational, and governmental purposes in the Elephant and Castle Comprehensive Development Area. This development was situated on what was then referred to as Site 4. The construction of the building concluded in May 1970 and garnered a commendation in the 1971 Good Design in Housing awards.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
11
2023

 

Hillside
Hillside was the childhood home of Sir Richard Burton. Hillside was previously known as both ’Clockhouse’ and ’Barham House’.

William Putland built the adjacent Coach House (still standing as two semi detached houses) in 1789. Barham House was built sometime between that date and 1820 for it was, in the 1820s, the home of a Samuel Baker. He was the grandfather of Richard Burton, a renowned Victorian explorer. Richard Burton was born in Torquay (Devon) in 1821 but christened at St Nicholas Church, Elstree. He spent a lot of his boyhood at the house.

The newsletter of the Elstree and Borehamwood Museum noted in 2014:

"Richard Burton became an Oxford scholar, explorer, archaeologist, diplomat, writer, translator, linguist (he could speak 25 languages in later years), and expert swordsman. He was always looking for new experiences to escape from what he termed ’The slavery of civilisation’. He had the looks to match his adventurous spirit, being 6 foot tall and...
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FEBRUARY
10
2023

 

Gambia Street, SE1
Gambia Street - then called William Street - was already on the 1800 maps of London. This area was primarily orchards and tenter grounds until the 1770s when development began due to the opening of Blackfriars Bridge in 1769.

On a map of 1760 Union Street (originally Charlotte Street) was dotted on the map running west from Duke Street (now Union Street continuing to the east).

Gambia Street seems to have been named in combination with Scoresby Street. Gambia Street was William Street and Scoresby Street was Pitt Street - both after the Prime Minister.

On Horwood’s map of 1799 (not illustrated), Charlotte Street (now Union Street) and William Street (Gambia Street) were shown for the first time. Residential buildings were on the frontage of William Street with commercial block leading onto Charlotte Street. The 1821 Gardner map shows Little Charlotte Street and William Street and a hat manufacturer.

The renaming to Gambia Street occurred during the name reorganisation by the Post Office in 1892.
...
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FEBRUARY
9
2023

 

Harefield
Harefield is the only sizeable village in what was Middlesex that remains separate from the London sprawl. Harefield enters recorded history through the Domesday Book (1086) as Herefelle, comprising the Anglo-Saxon words Here ’[danish] army’ and felle ’field’.

Before the Norman conquest of England, Harefield belonged to Countess Goda, sister of Edward the Confessor. Her husbands, Frenchmen Dreux of the Vexin and Count Eustace of Boulogne, were connected to the area.

After the Norman conquest, Richard FitzGilbert, son of Count Gilbert of Brionne, gained ownership of Harefield. In the Domesday Book, it was listed with enough arable land for five ploughs and meadow land for only one plough. Notably, Harefield’s woodland areas supported 1200 pigs, the second-highest in the Hundred of Elthorne. The population in the 12th or 13th century transitioned from free tenants to unfree.

Harefield was later divided into the main manor of Harefield and the submanors of Brackenbury and Moorhall. After passing th...
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FEBRUARY
8
2023

 

Wimbledon Park
Wimbledon Park station was opened by the District Railway on 3 June 1889 on an extension from Putney Bridge to Wimbledon. The extension which included Wimbledon Park was built by the London and South Western Railway which from 1 July 1889, ran its own trains over the line from a connection at East Putney to its Clapham Junction to Barnes line.

The section from Putney Bridge to Wimbledon was the last part of the District Line to be converted from steam operation to electric. Electric trains began running on 27 August 1905.

Wimbledon Park itself is the second largest park in the London Borough of Merton and lends its name to the station. To the immediate west of the park resides the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
7
2023

 

Commercial Road, E1
Commercial Road is a major thoroughfare (the A13) running east-west from the junction of Burdett Road and East India Dock Road to Braham Street. In 1802, the East India Company obtained parliamentary approval to construct a new road connecting the new West India Dock Gate to Church Lane in Whitechapel. The proposed road roughly followed the path of an existing route known as White Horse Lane, which was already indicated on maps of that era. Construction of the initial segment of the road took place in 1803.

The transformation of this road into a residential neighbourhood began with the establishment of sugar refineries in St George-in-the-East. This led to the construction of small houses to accommodate the workers in the sugar industry. Along the Stepney section of the road, an appealing residential area for the more affluent residents was developed, including terraces and places. For a time, the Commercial Road had an aura of prosperity, bolstered by the emergence of shops.

However, during the 1820s and 1830s, the increasing flow of heavy traffic along the road gradually diminished its charm for...
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FEBRUARY
6
2023

 

Ilbert Street, W10
Ilbert Street is the ’I’ street on the Queen’s Park Estate, W10 The Queen’s Park Estate was started in 1874. By building on open land and not in city centres, cottage estates of this type contrasted dramatically with the contemporary tenement blocks of other charitable bodies. They were the forerunners of the "Garden City" movement which influenced the design and layout of residential areas and the development of Town Planning.

Despite the destruction of a number of streets during the Second World War, later efforts to replace the cottages with blocks of flats around the perimeter and the laying out of a recreation ground in the centre, Queen’s Park is a remarkably complete example of a cottage estate. The remaining 19th century cottages have become desirable properties; their attraction is reflected in the popularity of the numerous small, cottage style developments still being built today.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
5
2023

 

Adams House, E1
Adams House is a Grade II listed block of offices. The Anchor Brewery, which ceased production in January 1975, saw the demolition of most of its buildings. Subsequently, the Anchor Retail Park was constructed on the site, named after the former brewery. However, a portion of the original Anchor Brewery structures remains at the corner of Mile End Road and Cephas Avenue. This preserved section now serves as an office block known as Adams House. Additionally, there is a residential component within this building referred to as Charrington House. The entire structure is a Grade II listed building.

Adams House was acquired by the senior partners of Adams Solicitors and renamed as such. It holds the distinction of being both Grade II listed and protected under the Stepney Green Conservation Area.

A report by Tower Hamlets Council characterised Adams House as:

"...an unusual corner building which makes a positive contribution to the area, both because of its architectural quality and its his...
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FEBRUARY
4
2023

 

Temple Fortune
Temple Fortune is a place in the London Borough of Barnet to the north of Golders Green. It is principally a shopping district used by residents of the Hampstead Garden Suburb. It is likely that the name Temple Fortune refers to the Knights of St John, who had land here (c.1240). "Fortune" possibly referred to a small settlement on the route from Hampstead to Hendon, marking a stop before reaching Hendon. At this point, a lane from Finchley called Ducksetters Lane, dating back to around 1475, intersected.

It’s probable that this settlement was initially part of the Bleccanham estate around the 900s. By the late 18th century, Temple Fortune Farm was established on the northern side of Farm Close.

The construction of the Finchley Road around 1827 replaced Ducksetters Lane as the route to Finchley and led to the growth of a small hamlet. Along the Finchley Road, several villas were built in the 1830s, and the Royal Oak public house emerged around the 1850s. By the end of the 19th century, the area had a population of around 300 residents, and there were amenities like a laundry and a small hospital for children with s...
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FEBRUARY
3
2023

 

Hampstead Garden Suburb
Hampstead Garden Suburb is an example of early twentieth-century domestic architecture and town planning and is located in the London Borough of Barnet. Hampstead Garden Suburb is a residential area positioned between Hampstead, Highgate and Golders Green. It is known for its connections to intellectual, artistic and literary circles.

The suburb was established by Henrietta Barnett, who, with her husband Samuel, had previously initiated the Whitechapel Art Gallery and Toynbee Hall. In 1906, Barnett established the Hampstead Garden Suburb Trust Ltd. The trust bought 243 acres of land from Eton College and appointed Raymond Unwin as its architect. The project had several goals:

- It aimed to accommodate people of various income levels and social classes.
- It prioritised lower housing density.
- Wide, tree-lined roads were a design feature.
- Houses were separated by hedges, not walls.
- Public gardens and green spaces were meant to be open to everyone.
- The suburb was envisioned as a peaceful place without the disturbance of church bells.

To realise these...
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FEBRUARY
2
2023

 

Alperton
Until the coming of the Underground railway, Alperton was a tiny hamlet. The name Alperton derives from the Old English language and means "farmstead or estate associated with a man named Ealhbeorht." It combines an Anglo-Saxon personal name, "Ealhbeorht," with "tun," which means farmstead or village in Old English.

Alperton station, originally named Perivale Alperton, was opened on 28 June 1903, by the District Railway (now known as the District Line). It was part of a new extension to South Harrow with electrified tracks originating from Park Royal & Twyford Abbey, which had opened just five days earlier. This extension, together with the existing tracks back to Acton Town, marked the first electrification of the Underground’s surface lines, replacing steam trains with electric ones. It’s worth noting that the deep-level tube lines, such as the City & South London Railway, Waterloo & City Railway, and Central London Railway, were electrically powered from their inception.

The station was renamed Alperton on 7 Oct...
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FEBRUARY
1
2023

 

White Hart Yard, SE1
White Hart Yard leads off Borough High Street. Borough High Street was once lined with large inns. Most of the inns were of considerable size and the largest inn was the White Hart.

The first recorded mention of the White Hart was in 1400. The White Hart was a common name and related to the personal badge of Richard II.
»read full article


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