3 Acklam Road

Address in/near Notting Hill, existed between the 1870s and 1977

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3 Acklam Road

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Address · Notting Hill · W10 ·
December
6
2015
From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.

In the early 1970s the house was taken over by the North Kensington Amenity Trust and became the Notting Hill Carnival office before its eventual demolition.



Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence



NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
29 Rackham Street, W10 29 Rackham Street lay about halfway along on the north side of the street.
3 Acklam Road From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.
Acklam Road protests Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway
Albert Hotel The Albert Hotel stood on the corner of All Saints Road and Westbourne Park Road.
All Saints Church All Saints church was designed by the Victorian Gothic revival pioneer William White, who was also a mountaineer, Swedish gymnastics enthusiast and anti-shaving campaigner.
Corner of Rackham Street, Ladbroke Grove (1950) The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
Duke of Cornwall (The Ledbury) The Duke of Cornwall pub morphed into the uber-trendy "The Ledbury" restaurant.
Graffiti along Acklam Road (1970s) Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway
Kensington Hippodrome The Kensington Hippodrome was a racecourse built in Notting Hill, London, in 1837, by entrepreneur John Whyte.
Kensington Park Hotel The KPH is a landmark pub on Ladbroke Grove.
Ladbroke Grove Ladbroke Grove is named after James Weller Ladbroke, who developed the Ladbroke Estate in the mid nineteenth century, until then a largely rural area on the western edges of London.
Ladbroke Grove looking north (1950) Ladbroke Grove on the corner of St Charles Sqaure taken outside the Eagle public house, looking north, just prior to the outbreak of the Second World War.
North Kensington Library North Kensington Library opened in 1891 and was described as one of London’s finest public libraries.
Political meeting (1920s) Meeting in front of the Junction Arms situated where Tavistock Road, Crescent and Basing Road met.
Portobello Farm Portobello Farm House was approached along Turnpike Lane, sometimes referred to as Green’s Lane, a track leading from Kensington Gravel Pits towards a wooden bridge over the canal.
Portobello Green Portobello Green features a shopping arcade under the Westway along Thorpe Close, an open-air market under the canopy, and community gardens.
Rackham Street, eastern end (1950) The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
St Charles Square after bombing (1950) A corner of St Charles Square looking north, just after the Second World War
St Charles Square ready for redevelopment (1951) Photographed in 1951, the corner of St Charles Square and Ladbroke Grove looking northwest just after the Second World War.
St Martins Mission Saint Martin's Mission was originally known as Rackham Hall as it was situated on Rackham Street.
St. Joseph's Home St Joseph's dominated a part of Portobello Road up until the 1980s.
The Apollo The Apollo pub was located at 18 All Saints Road, on the southeast corner of the Lancaster Road junction.
The Eagle The Eagle, on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Telford Road.
The Mitre The Mitre was situated at 62 Golborne Road.
Western Iron Works The Western Iron Works was the foundry business of James Bartle and Co.

NEARBY STREETS
Acklam Road, W10 Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway.
Alba Place, W11 Alba Place is part of the Colville Conservation Area.
Aldridge Road Villas, W11 Aldridge Road Villas is a surviving fragment of mid-Victorian residential development.
All Saints Road, W11 Built between 1852-61, All Saints Road is named after All Saints Church on Talbot Road.
Athlone Place, W10 Athlone Place runs between Faraday Road and Bonchurch Road.
Bartle Road, W11 Bartle Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Basing Street, W11 Basing Street was originally Basing Road between 1867 and 1939.
Bassett Road, W10 Bassett Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Bevington Road, W10 Bevington Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Blagrove Road, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode.
Blenheim Crescent, W11 Blenheim Crescent one of the major thoroughfares in Notting Hill - indeed it features in the eponymous film.
Bonchurch Road, W10 Bonchurch Road was first laid out in the 1870s.
Bruce Close, W10 Bruce Close replaced the earlier Rackham Street in this part of W10.
Cambridge Gardens, W10 Cambridge Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Chesterton Road, W10 Chesterton Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Clydesdale Road, W11 Clydesdale Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Colville Gardens, W11 Colville Gardens was laid out in the 1870s by the builder George Frederick Tippett, who developed much of the rest of the neighbourhood.
Colville Houses, W11 Colville Houses is part of the Colville Conservation Area.
Colville Mews, W11 Colville Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Colville Square, W11 Colville Square is a street in Notting Hill.
Colville Terrace, W11 Colville Terrace, W11 has strong movie connnections.
Convent Gardens, W11 Convent Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Cornwall Road, W11 Cornwall Road was once the name for the westernmost part of Westbourne Park Road.
Dartmouth Close, W11 Dartmouth Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Dunworth Mews, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Edenham Way, W10 Edenham Way is a 1970s street.
Elcom Street, W10 Elcom Street was replaced by Meanwhile Gardens.
Elgin Mews, W11 Elgin Mews lies in Notting Hill.
Elkstone Road, W10 Elkstone Road replaced Southam Street around 1970.
Faraday Road, W10 Faraday Road is one of the ’scientist’ roadnames of North Kensington.
Folly Mews, W11 Folly Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Golborne Mews, W10 Golborne Mews lies off of the Portobello Road, W10.
Golborne Road, W10 Golborne Road, heart of North Kensington, was named after Dean Golbourne, at one time vicar of St. John’s Church in Paddington.
Golden Mews, W11 Golden Mews was a tiny mews off of Basing Street, W11.
Great Western Road, W11 The name of the Great Western Road dates from the 1850s.
Hayden’s Place, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Hayden’s Place, W11 Haydens Place is a small cul-de-sac off of the Portobello Road.
Hayden’s Place, W11 Hayden’s Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Hedgegate Court, W11 Hedgegate Court is a street in Notting Hill.
Kensal Place, W10 Kensal Place ran from Southam Street to Kensal Road.
Kensington Park Mews, W11 Kensington Park Mews lies off of Kensington Park Road, W11
Ladbroke Crescent, W11 Ladbroke Crescent belongs to the third and final great period of building on the Ladbroke estate and the houses were constructed in the 1860s.
Ladbroke Grove, W10 Ladbroke Grove runs from Notting Hill in the south to Kensal Green in the north, and straddles the W10 and W11 postal districts.
Lancaster Road, W11 Lancaster Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Leamington House, W11 Residential block
Leamington Road Villas, W11 Leamington Road Villas is a street in Notting Hill.
Ledbury Road, W11 Ledbury Road is split between W2 and W11, the postal line intersecting the street.
Ledbury Road, W2 Ledbury Road is a street in Paddington.
Lionel Mews, W10 Lionel Mews was built around 1882 and probably disappeared in the 1970s.
Malton Mews, W10 Malton Mews, formerly Oxford Mews, runs south off of Cambridge Gardens.
Malton Road, W10 Malton Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Maxilla Walk, W10 Maxilla Walk is a street in North Kensington, London W10
McGregor Road, W11 McGregor Road runs between St Luke’s Road and All Saints Road.
Millwood Street, W10 Millwood Street is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Modena Street, W9 Modena Street was swept away in the late 1960s.
Morgan Road, W10 Morgan Road connects Wornington Road and St Ervans Road.
Munro Mews, W10 Munro Mews is a part cobbled through road that connects Wornington Road and Wheatstone Road.
Murchison Road, W10 Murchison Road existed for just under 100 years.
Norburn Street, W10 Norburn Street is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Orchard Close, W10 Orchard Close is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Oxford Gardens, W10 Oxford Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Pinehurst Court, W11 Pinehurst Court is a mansion block at 1-9 Colville Gardens.
PO Box 4 A street within the W9 postcode
Portobello Road, W10 Portobello Road is split into two sections by the Westway/Hammersmith and City line.
Portobello Road, W11 Portobello Road is internationally famous for its market.
Powis Gardens, W11 Powis Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Powis Mews, W11 Powis Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Powis Square, W11 Powis Square is a square between Talbot Road and Colville Terrace.
Powis Terrace, W11 Powis Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Pressland Street, W10 Pressland Street ran from Kensal Road to the canal.
Rackham Street, W10 Rackham Street is a road that disappeared from the streetscape of London W10 in 1951.
Raddington Road, W10 Raddington Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Raymede Street, W10 Raymede Street, after severe bomb damage in the area, disappeared after 1950.
Rendle Street, W10 Rendle Street ran from Murchison Road to Telford Road.
Rillington Place, W11 Rillington Place is a small street with an infamous history.
Ruston Mews, W11 Ruston Mews, W11 was originally Crayford Mews.
Saint Lukes Mews, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Saint Marks Place, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Silvester Mews, W11 Silvester Mews was a mews off of Basing Street, W11.
St Andrews Square, W11 St Andrews Square is a street in Notting Dale, formed when the Rillington Place area was demolished.
St Charles Place, W10 St Charles Place is a street in North Kensington, London W10
St Charles Square, W10 St Charles Square is a street in North Kensington, London W10
St Columbs House, W10 St Columbs House is situated at 9-39 Blagrove Road.
St Ervans Road, W10 St Ervans Road is named after the home town of the Rev. Samuel Walker.
St Joseph’s Close, W10 St Joseph’s Close is a cul-de-sac off of Bevington Road.
St Lawrence Terrace, W10 St Lawrence Terrace is a street in North Kensington, London W10
St Lukes Mews, W11 St Lukes Mews is a mews off of All Saints Road, W11.
St Luke’s Mews, W11 St Luke’s Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
St Luke’s Road, W11 St Luke’s Road is a street in Notting Hill.
St Mark’s Place, W11 St Mark’s Place is situated on the site of the former Kensington Hippodrome.
St Mark’s Road, W11 St. Mark’s Road is a street in the Ladbroke conservation area.
St Michael’s Gardens, W10 St Michael’s Gardens lies to the south of St Michael’s Church.
Talbot Road, W11 The oldest part of Talbot Road lies in London, W11.
Tavistock Crescent, W11 Tavistock Crescent was where the first Notting Hill Carnival procession began on 18 September 1966.
Tavistock Mews, W11 Tavistock Mews, W11 lies off of the Portobello Road.
Tavistock Road, W11 Tavistock Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Telford Road, W10 Telford Road is one of the local streets named after prominent nineteenth century scientists.
Thorpe Close, W10 Thorpe Close is a redevelopment of the former Thorpe Mews, laid waste by the building of the Westway.
Wesley Square, W11 Wesley Square is a street in Notting Hill.
Westbourne Park Road, W11 Westbourne Park Road runs between Notting Hill and the Paddington area.
Westway, W10 Westway is the A40(M) motorway which runs on an elevated section along the W10/W11 border.
Wheatstone Road, W10 Wheatstone Road was the former name of the eastern section of Bonchurch Road.
Woodfield Road, W9 The first section of Woodfield Road seems to date from the 1830s.
Wornington Road, W10 Wornington Road connected Golborne Road with Ladbroke Grove, though the Ladbroke end is now closed to through traffic.


Queen's Park

Queen's Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen's Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen's Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen's Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen's Park 'proper' formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen's Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen's Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett's wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen's Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queens Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen's Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway (LNWR) on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen's Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen's Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR. As of December 2013, no mainline services calling at the station and the Watford service has been transferred to London Overground.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Rackham Street sign
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Horse in Golborne Road
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The Apollo in the 1980s
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