Granville Road, NW6

Road in/near Kilburn Park, existing between the 1860s and now

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  ·  MAPS  ·  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.53291 -0.19766, 51.532 -0.197) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · * · NW6 ·
December
9
2015
Granville Road, NW6 was formerly Pembroke Road.

At the turn of the 1860s, builders laid out Granville Road, then called Pembroke Road in Kilburn Park. Being so close to the Edgware Road, with its good connections to central London, they hoped to attract a higher class of purchaser.

But by 1871 Kilburn was socially mixed - not as high-class as the builders had hoped but still including a few large houses like Kilburn House and streets like Alexandra (later Princess) Road where more than half the houses employed servants.

Commercial travellers, salesmen, and shopkeepers were among the inhabitants. There was still a strong middle-class, mainly professional and commercial, element in the population.

From early on, however, the working classes predominated and contemporaries noted the horrifying conditions in which many of Kilburn’s inhabitants lived. The overall density of 8 persons to a house in 1875 concealed streets like the newly built Pembroke Road in Kilburn Park where each house contained from four to six households.

It lay in the parish of St. John where 7,000 of the 9,000 residents in 1880 were said to be working-class, there were no wealthy people to give money for churches or schools, and in one group of streets 525 families lived in 81 houses.

Sickness was rife, and in 1875 Kilburn was castigated for its chronic pauperism, negligence, ignorance, and lack of cleanliness. The people usually came from similar conditions in Paddington and Marylebone and included, already in 1871 but increasingly during the 20th century, recent Irish immigrants.

They included a shifting population of the temporarily employed, often bachelors working in the building industry and living in overcrowded lodging houses. Social life centred around the public houses, said in 1949 to average one for every 424 people in south Kilburn compared with one to every 2,618 for the rest of Willesden.

The density of population in the whole of Kilburn remained at nearly 8 persons per house until well after the Second World War and in southern Kilburn was consistently over 10 people to a house. In 1881 in St. Luke’s parish it was over 12 people to a house. In south Kilburn in 1921 there were 208 people to an acre. In 1934 Pembroke Road was still notable for its poverty and overcrowding, and the poorest district in Willesden was the group of streets near Kilburn (Park) station.

A beginning was made of slum clearance in 1938 when houses were destroyed in Alpha Place, off Canterbury Road, but the Second World War intervened

Redevelopment after the Second World War split Granville Road into two halves.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

Click here to go to a random London street
We now have 410 completed street histories and 47090 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Lived here
Brenda Jackson   
Added: 13 Aug 2017 21:39 GMT   

83 Pembroke Road
My Gt Gt grandparents lived at 83 Pembroke Road before it became Granville Road, They were married in 1874, John Tarrant and Maryann Tarrant nee Williamson.

Her brother George Samuel Williamson lived at 95 Pembroke Road with his wife Emily and children in the 1881 Census

Apparently the extended family also lived for many years in Alpha Place, Canterbury Road, Peel Road,

Reply
Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:30 GMT   

Kilburn Park - opened 1915
Kilburn Park station was opened at the height of the First World War

Reply
Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:49 GMT   

A bit of a lift....
Kilburn Park was the first station to be designed around escalators, rather than lifts.

Reply
Comment
charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

Reply

Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

Reply

The Underground Map   
Added: 24 Nov 2020 14:25 GMT   

The 1879 Agricultural Show
The 1879 Royal Agricultural Society of England’s annual show was held on an area which later became Queen’s Park and opened on 30 June 1879.

The show ran for a week but the poor weather meant people had to struggle through deep mud and attendances fell disastrously. The visit to the show by Queen Victoria on the fifth day rallied visitors and nearly half the people who visited the show went on that day.

Reply
Comment
GRaleigh   
Added: 23 Feb 2021 09:34 GMT   

Found a bug
Hi all! Thank you for your excellent site. I found an overlay bug on the junction of Glengall Road, NW6 and Hazelmere Road, NW6 on the 1950 map only. It appears when one zooms in at this junction and only on the zoom.

Cheers,
Geoff Raleigh

Source: Glengall Road, NW6

Reply
Reply
The Underground Map   
Added: 25 Feb 2021 13:11 GMT   

Glengall Road, NW6
Thanks Geoff!

Reply
Comment
Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

Reply
Reply
Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:27 GMT   

Hewer Street, W10
My husband Barry Newton lived over John Nodes in Hewer Street in 1950’s. Barry dad Tom worked for John Nodes and raced pigeons in his spare time Tom and his Lena raised 5 sons there before moving to the Southcoast in the mid 70’s due to Tom ill health

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

Reply
Lived here
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   

Mcgregor Road, W11 (1938 - 1957)
I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood -from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

Reply
Comment
donna    
Added: 25 Jan 2021 13:25 GMT   

Ladbroke Dwellings
Three generations of my family lived along this row of dwellings, ’Ladbroke Dwellings’. All the men who lived there worked at the Gasworks. Among the shops you mention was Wilson’s sweet shop run by Maggie and her sister, and Johns grocery store. I believe there was also a photograph studio there too.



Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
David James Bloomfield   
Added: 13 Jul 2021 11:54 GMT   

Hurstway Street, W10
Jimmy Bloomfield who played for Arsenal in the 1950s was brought up on this street. He was a QPR supporter as a child, as many locals would be at the time, as a teen he was rejected by them as being too small. They’d made a mistake

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
Comment
Added: 6 Jul 2021 05:38 GMT   

Wren Road in the 1950s and 60s
Living in Grove Lane I knew Wren Road; my grandfather’s bank, Lloyds, was on the corner; the Scout District had their office in the Congregational Church and the entrance to the back of the Police station with the stables and horses was off it. Now very changed - smile.

Reply

fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

Reply
Lived here
Kim Johnson   
Added: 24 Jun 2021 19:17 GMT   

Limehouse Causeway (1908)
My great grandparents were the first to live in 15 Tomlins Terrace, then my grandparents and parents after marriage. I spent the first two years of my life there. My nan and her family lived at number 13 Tomlins Terrace. My maternal grandmother lived in Maroon house, Blount Street with my uncle. Nan, my mum and her brothers were bombed out three times during the war.

Reply
Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Bayswater Rivulet The Bayswater Rivulet was the original name for the Westbourne River
Kilburn Bridge Kilburn Bridge once marked the spot where the Edgware Road crossed the River Westbourne.
Kilburn Library Kilburn Library on Kilburn High Road is one of two sites called Kilburn Library, the other being in Salusbury Road, NW6.
Kilburn Park Kilburn Park station was opened on 31 January 1915 as the temporary terminus of the Bakerloo line’s extension from Paddington.
Kilburn Park Farm Kilburn Park Farm was situated almost opposite the Red Lion along the Edgware Road.
Queen’s Park Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.
Red Lion The Red Lion was situated at 34 Kilburn High Road.
St Augustine’s Church of England High School St Augustine’s Church of England High School is a Voluntary Aided Church of England comprehensive school in the West London borough of Westminster, Kilburn.
St Augustine’s, Kilburn St Augustine’s was founded by Richard Carr Kirkpatrick in the Anglo-Catholic tradition in 1870 and listed as a Grade I building by Historic England.

NEARBY STREETS
Albert Road, NW6 Albert Road in NW6 escaped the mass renaming of Albert Roads in London.
Alpha Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Andover Place, NW6 Valeside House is on Kilburn Park Road.
Argo House, NW6 Argo House is a location in London.
Ashmore Road, W9 Ashmore Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Birchside Apartments, NW6 Birchside Apartments is a location in London.
Bradiston Road, W9 Bradiston Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Bravington Road, W9 Bravington Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Bristol Walk, NW6 Bristol Walk is a location in London.
Brondesbury Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Brondesbury Villas, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cambridge Avenue, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cambridge Court, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cambridge Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cambridge Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Canterbury Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Canterbury Terrace, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Canterbury Works, NW6 Canterbury Works is a road in the NW6 postcode area
Carlton Vale, NW6 Carlton Vale runs from the Edgware Road to Kilburn Lane.
Cathedral Walk, NW6 Cathedral Walk is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Cedarside Apartments, NW6 Cedarside Apartments is a location in London.
Chichester Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Coventry Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Croxley Road, W9 Croxley Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Denholme Road, W9 Denholme Road connects Fernhead Road with Saltram Crescent.
Denmark Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Dibdin House, NW6 Residential block
Fordingley Road, W9 Fordingley Road is a street in Maida Vale.
George House, NW6 George House is a location in London.
Gorefield Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Greville Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Hansel Road, NW6 Hansel Road is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Hartland Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Helmsdale House, NW6 Residential block
Honiton Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kilburn Lane, NW6 Kilburn Lane is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Kilburn Lane, W9 Kilburn Lane is a street in Maida Vale.
Kilburn Park Road, NW6 Kilburn Park Road was built along the course of the Bayswater Rivulet (the River Westbourne), starting in 1855
Kilburn Park Road, NW6 Kilburn Park Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Lynton Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Macroom Road, W9 Macroom Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Malvern Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Malvern Mews, NW6 Malvern Mews is a road in the W9 postcode area
Malvern Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Malvern Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Manor Mews, NW6 Manor Mews is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Maple Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Marban Road, W9 Marban Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Masefield House, NW6 Residential block
Nelson Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Neville Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Neville Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Nexus Court, NW6 Nexus Court is a location in London.
Oxford Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Peel Precinct, NW6 Peel Precinct is a road in the NW6 postcode area
Pentland Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Plaza Parade, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Portnall Road, W9 Portnall Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Princess Road, NW6 Princess Road was once known as Alexandra Road.
Randolph Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Regents Plaza, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Rudolph Road, NW6 Rudolph Road is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Rupert Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Saltram Crescent, W9 Saltram Crescent is a street in Maida Vale.
Springfield Lane, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Stafford Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Stafford Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Stuart Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Swift House, NW6 Swift House is a location in London.
Thurso House, NW6 Thurso House is a location in London.
Tollgate Gardens, NW6 Tollgate Gardens is a location in London.
Torridon House, NW6 Residential block
Wells Court, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
William Dunbar House, NW6 Residential block
William Saville House, NW6 Residential block
Woodville Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6

NEARBY PUBS
Prince of Wales This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Queens Arms The Queens Arms Hotel is situated at the the beginning of Kilburn High Road as Maida Vale ends.
Red Lion The Red Lion was situated at 34 Kilburn High Road.
Royal British Legion (West Kilburn) Ltd This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Salusbury This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Kilburn Park

Kilburn Park station was opened on 31 January 1915 as the temporary terminus of the Bakerloo line’s extension from Paddington.

The area of Kilburn Park was developed in the 1850s somewhat south of the area then known as Kilburn in the fields west of the Edgware Road. The "Park" in the name was simply an invention by the developer, James Bailey.

Bailey had teamed up in a consortium of five developers who in 1850 bought 47 acres from owner the Reverend Edward Stuart. The consortium laid out roads and sewers and divided the site among themselves, subletting to smaller firms who built a few houses each.

The isolated, muddy location failed to attract many buyers and the estate remained incomplete for several decades. Properties were soon subdivided, some containing as many as six households in the 1870s.

The suburb of Kilburn Park was finally complete in the late 1880s.

Kilburn Park station was opened on 31 January 1915 as the temporary terminus of the Bakerloo line’s extension from Paddington  towards Queen’s Park.

The original plan had the London North West Railway (LNWR) creating a new line from Queen’s Park to Euston - but these underground ideas changed and a new "proper" line was built instead. But extending south from Queen’s Park gained momentum and, in 1911, it was mooted to extend the London Electric Railway (LER) company’s Bakerloo Line in that direction.

The Bakerloo Line offered a direct West End route without the need for changing trains though the Bakerloo was not the first option for bringing trains into the West End from the direction of Watford. A connection with the Hampstead Tube at Chalk Farm was looked at but not found to be feasible so the more expensive Bakerloo scheme then became the preferred route.

<img class="wp-image-85 size-medium" src="http://theundergroundmap.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/kilburnpark-209x300.jpg" alt="kilburnpark" width="209" height="300" /></a>

This arrangement suited the LER very well. It would capture a valuable new traffic and help fill the spare capacity along the existing line, and all at modest cost. It would also resolve once and for all how the Bakerloo should approach Paddington where the surface station layout was complicated. Vacillation about what to do after reaching Paddington had prevented the Bakerloo getting beyond Edgware Road as it was impossible to agree a route to Paddington without knowledge of where a future extension might go. Paddington was reached in 1913, with the GWR paying £18,000 towards the scheme.

Unfortunately, by the time work on the extension was well in hand, the Great War had broken out and this and other delays (including some very bad weather) somewhat disrupted plans. The Bakerloo service began on 31 January 1915, trains calling only at Warwick Avenue and Kilburn Park. Queens Park (though still incomplete) was sufficiently advanced to open on 11 February 1915, and Maida Vale was finally ready on 6 June 1915.

The Kilburn Park station building was designed by Stanley Heaps in a modified version of the earlier Leslie Green designed Bakerloo line stations with glazed terra cotta façades but without the large semi-circular windows at first floor level. It was one of the first London Underground stations built specifically to use escalators rather than lifts. Because of the lack of lifts, there was no longer any need for an engine room, and the new station building was built as a single story building.

Maida Vale station, down the line was the first London station to have all-female staff. When it opened in 1915 during the First World War, there were two ticket collectors, two porters, two booking clerks, and relief ticket collector-booking clerks. Kilburn Park station was also staffed by women, though not exclusively so.

Because of the shortage of male workers, women’s role expanded  on the Bakerloo Line - first of all in stations like Maida Vale and Kilburn Park, but eventually on trains too. In August 1918 an unofficial strike, mainly affecting this line, played a part in moving towards equal pay for women.

<a href="http://theundergroundmap.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/178.png"><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-86" src="http://theundergroundmap.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/178.png" alt="178" width="583" height="383" /></a>


LOCAL PHOTOS
Mortimer Place, NW6
TUM image id: 1492961898
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Caird Street street sign.
TUM image id: 1456818442
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Weston’s Cider House
TUM image id: 1453899876
Licence: CC BY 2.0
91 Fernhead Road, W9
TUM image id: 1478550881
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Kilburn Wells
TUM image id: 1481201889
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Kilburn Park Farm
TUM image id: 1490745540
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Lancefield Coachworks
TUM image id: 1499939772
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Bell, Kilburn Wells (around 1800)
TUM image id: 1602693126
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Amberley Mews - "The Blue Lamp"
TUM image id: 1545401678
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
91 Fernhead Road, W9
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Kilburn Wells
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Kilburn Park Farm
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The Bell, Kilburn Wells (around 1800)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The Kilburn tollgate in 1860
Credit: Brent Archives
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Kilburn House
Credit: Brent Archives
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Print-friendly version of this page