Golborne Gardens, W10

Road in/near Kensal Town

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Road · Kensal Town · W10 ·
JANUARY
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2000
Golborne Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
   
Added: 14 Jan 2022 03:06 GMT   

Goldbourne Gardens W 10
I lived in Goldbourne Gardens in the 50,s very happy big bomb site

Reply

Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

Reply
Lived here
Tom Vague   
Added: 9 Sep 2020 14:02 GMT   

The Bedford family at 3 Acklam Road (1860 - 1965)
From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.

When the Westway construction work began the Bedfords sold up and moved to south London. In the early 1970s the house was taken over by the North Kensington Amenity Trust and became the Notting Hill Carnival office before its eventual demolition.

Anne Bedford (now McSweeney) has fond memories of living there, although she recalls: ’I now know that the conditions were far from ideal but then I knew no different. There was no running hot water, inside toilet or bath, apart from the tin bath we used once a week in the large kitchen/dining room. Any hot water needed was heated in a kettle. I wasn’t aware that there were people not far away who were a lot worse off than us, living in poverty in houses just like mine but families renting one room. We did have a toilet/bathroom installed in 1959, which was ’luxury’.

’When the plans for the Westway were coming to light, we were still living in the house whilst all the houses opposite became empty and boarded up one by one. We watched all this going on and decided that it was not going to be a good place to be once the builders moved in to demolish all the houses and start work on the elevated road. Dad sold the house for a fraction of what it should have been worth but it needed too much doing to it to bring it to a good living standard. We were not rich by any means but we were not poor. My grandmother used to do her washing in the basement once a week by lighting a fire in a big concrete copper to heat the water, which would have been there until demolition.

’When we moved from number 3, I remember the upright piano that my grandparents used to play - and me of sorts - being lowered out of the top floor and taken away, presumably to be sold. I used to play with balls up on the wall of the chemist shop on the corner of Acklam and Portobello. We would mark numbers on the pavement slabs in a grid and play hopscotch. At the Portobello corner, on one side there was the Duke of Sussex pub, on the other corner, a chemist, later owned by a Mr Fish, which I thought was amusing. When I was very young I remember every evening a man peddling along Acklam Road with a long thin stick with which he lit the streetlights.’ Michelle Active who lived at number 33 remembers: ’6 of us lived in a one-bed basement flat on Acklam Road. When they demolished it we moved to a 4-bed maisonette on Silchester Estate and I thought it was a palace, two toilets inside, a separate bathroom that was not in the kitchen, absolute heaven.’



Reply
Lived here
Brenda Jackson   
Added: 13 Aug 2017 21:39 GMT   

83 Pembroke Road
My Gt Gt grandparents lived at 83 Pembroke Road before it became Granville Road, They were married in 1874, John Tarrant and Maryann Tarrant nee Williamson.

Her brother George Samuel Williamson lived at 95 Pembroke Road with his wife Emily and children in the 1881 Census

Apparently the extended family also lived for many years in Alpha Place, Canterbury Road, Peel Road,

Reply
Born here
Susan Wright   
Added: 16 Sep 2017 22:42 GMT   

Ada Crowe, 9 Bramley Mews
My Great Grandmother Ada Crowe was born in 9 Bramley Mews in 1876.

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

Reply

The Underground Map   
Added: 24 Nov 2020 14:25 GMT   

The 1879 Agricultural Show
The 1879 Royal Agricultural Society of England’s annual show was held on an area which later became Queen’s Park and opened on 30 June 1879.

The show ran for a week but the poor weather meant people had to struggle through deep mud and attendances fell disastrously. The visit to the show by Queen Victoria on the fifth day rallied visitors and nearly half the people who visited the show went on that day.

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

Reply
Comment
Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


Reply
Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:30 GMT   

Kilburn Park - opened 1915
Kilburn Park station was opened at the height of the First World War

Reply
Comment
PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

Reply
Lived here
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   

Mcgregor Road, W11 (1938 - 1957)
I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood -from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

Reply

Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

Reply
Comment
Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

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Comment
ken gaston   
Added: 16 Jan 2021 11:04 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My grandmother Hilda Baker and a large family lived in number 18 . It was a close community and that reflected in the coronation celebration held on the central green . I grew up in that square and went to school at Sirdar Road then St. Clements it was a great place to grow up with a local park and we would also trek to Holland Park or Kensington Gardens .Even then the area was considered deprived and a kindergarden for criminals . My generation were the first to escape to the new towns and became the overspill from London to get decent housing and living standards .

Reply
Lived here
Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 15:38 GMT   

6 East Row (1960 - 1960)
We lived at 6 East Row just before it was demolished.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Chris Nash   
Added: 10 Jan 2022 22:54 GMT   

Shortlands Close, DA17
Shortlands Close and the flats along it were constructed in the mid-1990s. Prior to this, the area was occupied by semi-detached houses with large gardens, which dated from the post-war period and were built on the site of Railway Farm. The farm and its buildings spanned the length of Abbey Road, on the south side of the North Kent Line railway tracks.

Reply

Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

Reply

Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

Reply
Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

Reply
Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

Reply
Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

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Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

Reply

STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
29 Rackham Street, W10 29 Rackham Street lay about halfway along on the north side of the street.
Acklam Road protests Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway
Adair Road before redevelopment A photo showing Adair Road’s junction with Golborne Gardens in March 1964.
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed) The Admiral Blake was situated at the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Barlby Road.
Clayton Arms A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town.
Corner of Caird Street and Lancefield Street (1910) The corner of Caird Street with Lancefield Street.
Corner of Rackham Street, Ladbroke Grove (1950) The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance is the traditional starting point for the Notting Hill Carnival.
Graffiti along Acklam Road (1970s) Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway
Harrow Road (1920s) Harrow Road in the 1920s, looking south east towards the Prince of Wales pub and the Emmanuel Church spire.
Jack of Newbury The Jack of Newbury stood at the corner of East Row and Kensal Road until it was bombed on 2 October 1940.
Kensal House There are two Kensal Houses in London W10 - this was the original
Ladbroke Grove Ladbroke Grove on the corner of St Charles Sqaure taken outside the Eagle public house, looking north, just prior to the outbreak of the Second World War.
Ladbroke Grove looking north (1900) This early 1900s image was taken just south of the junction of Ladbroke Grove and Treverton Street.
Ladbroke Grove railway bridge Looking north over Bartle Bridge in the 1950s
Lads of the Village One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road.
Middle Row School Middle Row School was established in the late 19th century to provide education to the children of Kensal New Town.
Orme’s Green Ormes Green was the former name for this part of Westbourne Park.
Portobello Arms The Portobello Arms was a former pub in Kensal Town, established in 1842.
Queen’s Park Library Queen’s Park Library was built to improve the minds of the new Queen’s Park Estate residents.
Rackham Street, eastern end (1950) The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
St Charles Square after bombing (1950) A corner of St Charles Square looking north, just after the Second World War
St Charles Square ready for redevelopment (1951) Photographed in 1951, the corner of St Charles Square and Ladbroke Grove looking northwest just after the Second World War.
St Martins Mission Saint Martin's Mission was originally known as Rackham Hall as it was situated on Rackham Street.
St. Joseph’s Home St Joseph's dominated a part of Portobello Road up until the 1980s.
The Eagle The Eagle, on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Telford Road.
The Flora The Flora is situated on Harrow Road, W10.
The Foresters The Foresters - a lost pub of London W10
The Mitre The Mitre was situated at 62 Golborne Road.
The Prince of Wales Cinema The Prince of Wales Cinema was located at 331 Harrow Road.
Wedlake Street Baths In a time when most had somewhere to live but few had somewhere to wash at home, public baths were the place to go...
Western Arms The Western Arms was a pub situated on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Kensal Road.
Weston’s Cider House In 1930 Weston’s opened their first and only cider mill on the Harrow Road.
William Miller’s Yard William Miller's Yard stood in Chapel Place, West Row.

NEARBY STREETS
Absalom Road, W10 Absalom Road was the former name for the western section of Golborne Gardens.
Adair Road, W10 Adair Road is a street on the Kensal Town/North Kensington borders.
Adair Tower, W10 Adair Tower is a post-war tower block on the corner of Adair Road and Appleford Road, W10.
Adela Street, W10 Adela Street is a small cul-de-sac in Kensal Town.
Alderson Street, W10 Alderson Street is a side street north of Kensal Road.
Alperton Street, W10 Alperton Street is the first alphabetically named street in the Queen’s Park Estate, W10.
Appleford House, W10 Appleford House is a residential block along Appleford Road.
Appleford Road, W10 Appleford Road was transformed post-war from a Victorian street to one dominated by housing blocks.
Athlone Place, W10 Athlone Place runs between Faraday Road and Bonchurch Road.
Barfett Street, W10 Barfett Street is a street on the Queen’s Park Estate, W10
Barnsdale Road, W9 Barnsdale Road runs between Fernhead Road and Walterton Road.
Bevington Road, W10 Bevington Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Bonchurch Road, W10 Bonchurch Road was first laid out in the 1870s.
Bosworth Road, W10 Bosworth Road was the first street built as Kensal New Town started to expand to the east.
Bransford Street, W10 Bransford Street became Porlock Street before vanishing altogether.
Briar Walk, W10 Briar Walk lies on the Queen's Park Estate
Bruce Close, W10 Bruce Close replaced the earlier Rackham Street in this part of W10.
Burlington Close, W9 Burlington Close is a street in Maida Vale.
Caird Street, W10 Caird Street is the ’C’ street on the Queen’s Park Estate
Conlan Street, W10 Conlan Street is one of the newer roads of Kensal Town.
Coomassie Road, W9 Coomassie Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Drayford Close, W9 Drayford Close is a street in Maida Vale.
Droop Street, W10 Droop Street is one of the main east-west streets of the Queen’s Park Estate.
East Row, W10 East Row is a road with a long history within Kensal Town.
Edenham Mews, W10 Edenham Mews was the site of a youth club and day nursery after the Second World War until demolition.
Edenham Street, W10 Edenham Street was swept away in 1969.
Edenham Way, W10 Edenham Way is a 1970s street.
Elkstone Road, W10 Elkstone Road replaced Southam Street around 1970.
Enbrook Street, W10 Enbrook Street is another street north of Harrow Road, W10 without a pub.
Faraday Road, W10 Faraday Road is one of the ’scientist’ roadnames of North Kensington.
Farrant Street, W10 Farrant Street is the missing link in the alphabetti spaghetti of the streetnames of the Queen’s Park Estate
Fermoy Road, W9 Fermoy Road was named in 1883 and partly built up by 1884
Fernhead Road, W9 Fernhead Road is a street in Maida Vale.
First Avenue, W10 First Avenue is street number one in the Queen's Park Estate
Fourth Avenue, W10 Fourth Avenue runs south from Ilbert Street.
Galton Street, W10 Galton Street lies within the Queen’s Park Estate, W10.
Golborne Mews, W10 Golborne Mews lies off of the Portobello Road, W10.
Golborne Road, W10 Golborne Road, heart of North Kensington, was named after Dean Golbourne, at one time vicar of St. John’s Church in Paddington.
Great Western Road, W9 Great Western Road’s northernmost section was created after a bridge was constructed over the canal.
Harrow Road, W10 Harrow Road is a main road through London W10.
Harrow Road, W9 Harrow Road is a main road running through Paddington, Willesden and beyond.
Hawthorn Walk, W10 Queen's Park Estate
Hazlewood Crescent, W10 Hazlewood Crescent, much altered by 1970s redevelopment, is an original road of the area.
Hazlewood Tower, W10 Hazlewood Tower is a skyscraper in North Kensington, London W10.
Heather Walk, W10 Heather Walk lies in the Queen’s Park Estate
Hormead Road, W9 Hormead Road was named in 1885 although its site was still a nursery ground until 1891.
Huxley Street, W10 Huxley Street is the only street beginning with an H on the Queen’s Park Estate.
James Collins Close, W9 James Collins Close is a street in Maida Vale.
James House, W10 James House is a residential block in Appleford Road.
Kensal Place, W10 Kensal Place ran from Southam Street to Kensal Road.
Kensal Road, W10 Kensal Road, originally called Albert Road, is the heart of Kensal Town.
Ladbroke Grove, W10 Ladbroke Grove runs from Notting Hill in the south to Kensal Green in the north, and straddles the W10 and W11 postal districts.
Lancefield Street, W10 Lancefield Street runs from Caird Street to Bruckner Street.
Lavie Mews, W10 Lavie Mews, W10 was a mews connecting Portobello Road and Murchison Road.
Lionel Mews, W10 Lionel Mews was built around 1882 and probably disappeared in the 1970s.
Lydford Road, W9 Lydford Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Manchester Drive, W10 Manchester Drive is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Maple Walk, W10 Post war development on the Queen’s Park Estate created some plant-based street names.
Maxilla Walk, W10 Maxilla Walk is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Middle Row, W10 Middle Row is one of the original streets laid out as Kensal New Town.
Modena Street, W9 Modena Street was swept away in the late 1960s.
Morgan Road, W10 Morgan Road connects Wornington Road and St Ervans Road.
Munro Mews, W10 Munro Mews is a part cobbled through road that connects Wornington Road and Wheatstone Road.
Murchison Road, W10 Murchison Road existed for just under 100 years.
Octavia House, W10 Octavia House on Southern Row was built in the late 1930s.
Orchard Close, W10 Orchard Close is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Pennymore Walk, W9 Pennymore Walk is a close which lies off of Ashmore Road.
Portobello Road, W10 Portobello Road is split into two sections by the Westway/Hammersmith and City line.
Pressland Street, W10 Pressland Street ran from Kensal Road to the canal.
Rackham Street, W10 Rackham Street is a road that disappeared from the streetscape of London W10 in 1951.
Raymede Street, W10 Raymede Street, after severe bomb damage in the area, disappeared after 1950.
Rendle Street, W10 Rendle Street ran from Murchison Road to Telford Road.
Riverton Close, W9 Riverton Close is a street in Maida Vale.
Ronan Walk, W10 Ronan Walk was one of the streets constructed in a 1970s build parallel to the Harrow Road.
Second Avenue, W10 Second Avenue is one of the streets of the Queen's Park Estate, W10
Shirland Mews, W9 Shirland Mews is a street in Maida Vale.
Southam House, W10 Southam House is situated on Adair Road.
Southam Street, W10 Southam Street was made world-famous in the photographs of Roger Mayne.
Southern Row, W10 Southern Row was originally South Row to match the other streets in the neighbourhood.
St Ervans Road, W10 St Ervans Road is named after the home town of the Rev. Samuel Walker.
St Joseph’s Close, W10 St Joseph’s Close is a cul-de-sac off of Bevington Road.
St Michael’s Gardens, W10 St Michael’s Gardens lies to the south of St Michael’s Church.
Sycamore Walk, W10 Queen's Park Estate
Telford Road, W10 Telford Road is one of the local streets named after prominent nineteenth century scientists.
Tollbridge Close, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Trellick Tower, W10 Trellick Tower is a 31-storey block of flats designed in the Brutalist style by architect Ernő Goldfinger, completed in 1972.
Treverton Street, W10 Treverton Street, a street which survived post war redevelopment.
Walterton Road, W9 Walterton Road was the central road of a suburb which was originally proposed to called St. Peter’s Park.
Warlock Road, W9 Warlock Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Wedlake Street, W10 Wedlake Street arrived as the second wave of building in Kensal Town was completed.
West Row, W10 West Row, W10 began its life in the early 1840s.
Western Dwellings, W10 Western Dwellings were a row of houses, opposite the Western Gas Works, housing some of the workers.
Western Mews, W9 Western Mews is a street in Maida Vale.
Wheatstone Road, W10 Wheatstone Road was the former name of the eastern section of Bonchurch Road.
Woodfield Place, W9 Woodfield Place is a street in Maida Vale.
Woodfield Road, W9 The first section of Woodfield Road seems to date from the 1830s.
Wornington Road, W10 Wornington Road connected Golborne Road with Ladbroke Grove, though the Ladbroke end is now closed to through traffic.

NEARBY PUBS
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed) The Admiral Blake was situated at the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Barlby Road.
Albion The Albion stopped being a pub early.
Brittania The Brittania disappeared as Trellick Tower began to take shape.
Chilled Eskimo This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Clayton Arms A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town.
Earl of Warwick The Earl of Warwick stood at 36 Golborne Road.
Jack of Newbury The Jack of Newbury stood at the corner of East Row and Kensal Road until it was bombed on 2 October 1940.
Kensal Community Centre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lads of the Village One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road.
Portobello Arms The Portobello Arms was a former pub in Kensal Town, established in 1842.
Sporting Club De Londres This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Eagle The Eagle, on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Telford Road.
The Earl Derby The Earl Derby stood on the corner of Southern Row and Bosworth Road.
The Flora The Flora is situated on Harrow Road, W10.
The Foresters The Foresters - a lost pub of London W10
The Metropolitan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Mitre The Mitre was situated at 62 Golborne Road.
The Prince of Wales A pub in Kensal Town
Western Arms The Western Arms was a pub situated on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Kensal Road.
Weston’s Cider House In 1930 Weston’s opened their first and only cider mill on the Harrow Road.


Kensal Town

Soapsuds Island

Kensal New Town was built between the Grand Central Canal (which opened in 1801) and the Great Western Railway line (opening in 1837) in the 1840s. It was built by a lawyer.

Single-storey cottages with gardens suitable for drying clothes were the first buildings and Kensal Road, Middle Row, West Row, East Row and Southern Row all appeared between 1841 and 1851. The rows of cottages quickly degenerated into a slum, mainly due to overcrowding, industrialisation and pollution.

The area was dominated by the Western Gas Company and Kensal Cemetery, which provided work but did little to improve the environment. Women were primarily involved in laundry work giving the area its nickname of ‘Soapsuds Island’.

The area was isolated from the rest of London at a time when Portobello Lane (now Portobello Road) was a muddy track sometimes impassable in bad weather.

Cut off from the municipal authorities it was left to charities to attempt to alleviate the social and health problems.

At the beginning of the 20th century, the cottage laundry industry began to be replaced by larger mechanized concerns.

In 1902 Charles Booth described it as, Just as full of children and poverty as was the old woman’s dwelling in the nursery rhyme. By this date the area had been transferred to the newly formed Royal Borough of Kensington. When the Piggeries and Potteries in Notting Dale were finally cleared in the early 20th century most of the displaced residents moved north into Golborne ward and Kensal.

By 1923 in the Southam Street area 140 houses contained some 2500 inhabitants. A series of evocative photographs by Roger Mayne in the 1950s showed that little had changed. It was only from the 1960s that the overcrowded and dilapidated terraces were cleared and replaced by social housing including Goldfinger’s Trellick Tower.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Coronation street party, 1953.
TUM image id: 1545250697
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The "Western"
TUM image id: 1489498043
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Ladbroke Grove (1866)
TUM image id: 1513618275
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Clayton Arms
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The Foresters
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The Lads of the Village pub
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The Prince of Wales
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Admiral Blake (The Cowshed)
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Kensington Park Hotel
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The Albion, now in residential use.
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In the neighbourhood...

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Coronation street party, 1953.
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Clayton Arms
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The Earl Derby stood on the corner of Southern Row and Bosworth Road. The Earl Derby himself was Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby who fought at the battle of Bosworth.
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The Foresters
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The Lads of the Village pub
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The Prince of Wales
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Middle Row School was constructed to provide education for the children of Kensal New Town. In 1877, an application was made to the Chelsea Vestry "to build a School House and premises. to be known as Middle Row Schools. Kensal Road by Messrs. Hook & Oldrey, builders..." The official opening took place on 19 August 1878.
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The Albion, now in residential use.
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The corner of Caird Street with Lancefield Street.
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201311211613
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