Cloth Fair, EC1A

Road in/near City of London, existing until now.

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(51.51905 -0.09976, 51.519 -0.099) 
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Road · * · EC1A ·
MAY
31
2021
Cloth Fair stands where the original Bartholomew Fair was held in medieval times.


The name ’cloth fair’ derives from the cloth merchants who used to buy and sell goods during the Bartholomew market.

Cloth Fair runs beside the Anglican church of St Bartholomew-the-Great. Some of the nearby buildings survived the Great Fire of London with numbers 41 and 42 built between 1597 and 1614 still surviving. The buildings were almost lost when they were classified as dangerous structures but the architects Paul Paget and John Seely bought the buildings in 1930 and carried out a sympathetic restoration. Their success enabled them to purchase and restore many other local buildings and they continued living and working together in 41 Cloth Fair.

The street was originally within the precincts of the Priory of St Bartholomew’s. Until 1910, it formed a separate liberty with gates that were shut every evening. It was this early ’gated community’ which helped the street avoid destruction in the Great Fire - the priory walls protected the area from being destroyed.

Although Cloth Fair was a wealthy street of merchants in the medieval era, by the Victorian period the street had developed into slum conditions - very poor sanitation and many families sharing small rooms in squalid conditions. Most of the ancient houses were demolished after the First World War and in the early 1920s as part of slum clearance schemes.

43 Cloth Fair is the former home of Poet Laureate John Betjeman and the City Music Foundation is based in Church House in the road.




Main source: Medieval London
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


C Hobbs   
Added: 31 Jan 2024 23:53 GMT   

George Gut (1853 - 1861)
George Gut, Master Baker lived with his family in Long Lane.
George was born in Bernbach, Hesse, Germany and came to the UK sometime in the 1840s. In 1849, George married an Englishwoman called Matilda Baker and became a nauralized Englishman. He was given the Freedom of the City of London (by Redemption in the Company of Bakers), in 1853 and was at that time, recorded as living at 3 Long Lane. In the 1861 census, George Gut was living at 11 Long Lane.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Wendy    
Added: 22 Mar 2024 15:33 GMT   

Polygon Buildings
Following the demolition of the Polygon, and prior to the construction of Oakshott Court in 1974, 4 tenement type blocks of flats were built on the site at Clarendon Sq/Phoenix Rd called Polygon Buildings. These were primarily for people working for the Midland Railway and subsequently British Rail. My family lived for 5 years in Block C in the 1950s. It seems that very few photos exist of these buildings.

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Steve   
Added: 19 Mar 2024 08:42 GMT   

Road construction and houses completed
New Charleville Circus road layout shown on Stanford’s Library Map Of London And Its Suburbs 1879 with access via West Hill only.

Plans showing street numbering were recorded in 1888 so we can concluded the houses in Charleville Circus were built by this date.

Source: Charleville Circus, Sydenham, London

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Comment
Steve   
Added: 19 Mar 2024 08:04 GMT   

Charleville Circus, Sydenham: One Place Study (OPS)
One Place Study’s (OPS) are a recent innovation to research and record historical facts/events/people focused on a single place �’ building, street, town etc.

I have created an open access OPS of Charleville Circus on WikiTree that has over a million members across the globe working on a single family tree for everyone to enjoy, for free, forever.

Source: Charleville Circus, Sydenham, London

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Comment
Charles   
Added: 8 Mar 2024 20:45 GMT   

My House
I want to know who lived in my house in the 1860’s.

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NH   
Added: 7 Mar 2024 11:41 GMT   

Telephone House
Donald Hunter House, formerly Telephone House, was the BT Offices closed in 2000

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Comment
Paul Cox   
Added: 5 Mar 2024 22:18 GMT   

War damage reinstatement plans of No’s 11 & 13 Aldine Street
Whilst clearing my elderly Mothers house of general detritus, I’ve come across original plans (one on acetate) of No’s 11 & 13 Aldine Street. Might they be of interest or should I just dispose of them? There are 4 copies seemingly from the one single acetate example. Seems a shame to just junk them as the level of detail is exquisite. No worries if of no interest, but thought I’d put it out there.

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Comment
Diana   
Added: 28 Feb 2024 13:52 GMT   

New Inn Yard, E1
My great grandparents x 6 lived in New Inn Yard. On this date, their son was baptised in nearby St Leonard’s Church, Shoreditch

Source: BDM London, Cripplegate and Shoreditch registers written by church clerk.

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Comment
Vic Stanley   
Added: 24 Feb 2024 17:38 GMT   

Postcose
The postcode is SE15, NOT SE1

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LOCAL PHOTOS
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Smithfield Market
TUM image id: 1620388545
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Amen Court, EC4M
TUM image id: 1493474208
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Holborn Viaduct from Farringdon Street, c. 1910 The building of Farringdon Street is considered one of the greatest urban engineering achievements of the 19th century. It was one of the first engineered multi-lane roads, and also buried the River Fleet in a system of underground tunnels, solving one of London’s most daunting sanitary problems. Its construction also included the building of the world’s first stretch of underground railway, a branch of the Metropolitan Railway that later became part of the London Underground running beneath Farringdon Road from King’s Cross St. Pancras into the City at Farringdon. The construction of Farringdon Street also necessitated the removal of the Fleet Market that had been built in 1736 above the course of the River Fleet, which is now London’s largest subterranean river. North of the market was Hockley-in-the-Hole (around Ray Street Bridge), an area notorious for bear-baiting and similar activities.
Credit: Bishopsgate Institute
TUM image id: 1686139066
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Farringdon Street, EC4M
TUM image id: 1530111130
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In the neighbourhood...

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Smithfield Market
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"Cheapside and Bow Church" engraved by W. Albutt (1837) First published in The History of London: Illustrated by Views in London and Westminster. Steel engraved print after a picture by T.H. Shepherd.
Credit: W. Albutt
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Saint John’s Gate, Clerkenwell, the main gateway to the Priory of Saint John of Jerusalem. The church was founded in the 12th century by Jordan de Briset, a Norman knight. Prior Docwra completed the gatehouse shown in this photograph in 1504. The gateway served as the main entry to the Priory, which was the center of the Order of St John of Jerusalem (the Knights Hospitallers).
Credit: Henry Dixon (1880)
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Illustration of Fleet Market
Credit: William Henry Prior
Licence: CC BY 2.0


At the corner of Clerkenwell Road and Goswell Road sits the Hat and Feathers. It was built on the site of an earlier tavern around 1860 for owner James Leask. It was designed by William Finch Hill who specialised in music halls and pubs.
Credit: Ewan Munro
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Amen Court, EC4M
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Clerkenwell Green (1898) The water fountain shown here became public toilets.
Licence:


Holborn Viaduct from Farringdon Street, c. 1910 The building of Farringdon Street is considered one of the greatest urban engineering achievements of the 19th century. It was one of the first engineered multi-lane roads, and also buried the River Fleet in a system of underground tunnels, solving one of London’s most daunting sanitary problems. Its construction also included the building of the world’s first stretch of underground railway, a branch of the Metropolitan Railway that later became part of the London Underground running beneath Farringdon Road from King’s Cross St. Pancras into the City at Farringdon. The construction of Farringdon Street also necessitated the removal of the Fleet Market that had been built in 1736 above the course of the River Fleet, which is now London’s largest subterranean river. North of the market was Hockley-in-the-Hole (around Ray Street Bridge), an area notorious for bear-baiting and similar activities.
Credit: Bishopsgate Institute
Licence:


Farringdon Street, EC4M
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Florin Court, Charterhouse Square (2008) The building was used as Whitehaven Mansions, the fictional London residence of Agatha Christie’s character Hercule Poirot, in the LWT television series Agatha Christie’s Poirot (1989–2013)
Credit: Flickr/conrad1967/
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