Deal Street, E1

Road in/near Whitechapel, existing between 1846 and now.

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(51.52019 -0.06737, 51.52 -0.067) 
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Road · * · E1 ·
November
20
2020
Deal Street dates from the mid 1840s.

Located in Mile End New Town was the second estate of the Metropolitan Association for Improving the Dwellings of the Industrious Classes.

Founded in 1842, the aim of the association was to provide model housing on a sound financial basis. The association was funded by philanthropic investors who were willing to accept a minimal return (usually around 4%-5%), permitting the maximum amount of money to be ploughed into construction. Locally, the site which the Association purchased in 1848 for £1300 was bounded on the north and west by two new roads: Underwood Road and Deal Street.

In summer 1848, a competition was held to provide a design comprising two buildings, one a block of family dwellings and the other a model lodging house for single men. The successful candidate was William Beck. A lodging house on the southern portion of the site was opened in December 1849 - the contractor was Samuel Grimsdell. The building, called ’The Artisan’s Home’, was given a considerable amount of attention by the architectural press as the first of its kind in the country.

Later along Deal Street, the Victoria and Albert Cottages were between 1857 and 1865 for the Association. Their architect was Henry Roberts who, from the 1840s onwards, pioneered the design of philanthropic housing in London. These cottages, which still exist, were parallel rows of houses, each separated by a narrow foot-path along which were small gardens serving one of the rows of dwellings. Both groups were partly derelict in the 1970s and threatened with demolition, but were repaired and are now owned by Tower Hamlets Council.


Main source: British History Online
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

Reply
Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

Reply

LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Wendy    
Added: 22 Mar 2024 15:33 GMT   

Polygon Buildings
Following the demolition of the Polygon, and prior to the construction of Oakshott Court in 1974, 4 tenement type blocks of flats were built on the site at Clarendon Sq/Phoenix Rd called Polygon Buildings. These were primarily for people working for the Midland Railway and subsequently British Rail. My family lived for 5 years in Block C in the 1950s. It seems that very few photos exist of these buildings.

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Steve   
Added: 19 Mar 2024 08:42 GMT   

Road construction and houses completed
New Charleville Circus road layout shown on Stanford’s Library Map Of London And Its Suburbs 1879 with access via West Hill only.

Plans showing street numbering were recorded in 1888 so we can concluded the houses in Charleville Circus were built by this date.

Source: Charleville Circus, Sydenham, London

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Comment
Steve   
Added: 19 Mar 2024 08:04 GMT   

Charleville Circus, Sydenham: One Place Study (OPS)
One Place Study’s (OPS) are a recent innovation to research and record historical facts/events/people focused on a single place �’ building, street, town etc.

I have created an open access OPS of Charleville Circus on WikiTree that has over a million members across the globe working on a single family tree for everyone to enjoy, for free, forever.

Source: Charleville Circus, Sydenham, London

Reply
Comment
Charles   
Added: 8 Mar 2024 20:45 GMT   

My House
I want to know who lived in my house in the 1860’s.

Reply

NH   
Added: 7 Mar 2024 11:41 GMT   

Telephone House
Donald Hunter House, formerly Telephone House, was the BT Offices closed in 2000

Reply
Comment
Paul Cox   
Added: 5 Mar 2024 22:18 GMT   

War damage reinstatement plans of No’s 11 & 13 Aldine Street
Whilst clearing my elderly Mothers house of general detritus, I’ve come across original plans (one on acetate) of No’s 11 & 13 Aldine Street. Might they be of interest or should I just dispose of them? There are 4 copies seemingly from the one single acetate example. Seems a shame to just junk them as the level of detail is exquisite. No worries if of no interest, but thought I’d put it out there.

Reply
Comment
Diana   
Added: 28 Feb 2024 13:52 GMT   

New Inn Yard, E1
My great grandparents x 6 lived in New Inn Yard. On this date, their son was baptised in nearby St Leonard’s Church, Shoreditch

Source: BDM London, Cripplegate and Shoreditch registers written by church clerk.

Reply
Comment
Vic Stanley   
Added: 24 Feb 2024 17:38 GMT   

Postcose
The postcode is SE15, NOT SE1

Reply



LOCAL PHOTOS
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46 Aldgate High Street
TUM image id: 1490910153
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The Boar’s Head was located on the north side of Whitechapel High Street. The Boar’s Head was originally an inn, which was built in the 1530s; it underwent two renovations for use as a playhouse: first, in 1598, when a simple stage was erected, and a second, more elaborate renovation in 1599.
Credit: Unknown
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The Third Goodmans Fields Theatre, Great Alie Street (1801)
Credit: W. W. Hutchings
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Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov (Lenin) addressing a "smoking debate" at Toynbee Hall (1902)
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The Whitechapel Gallery was designed by Charles Harrison Townsend and opened in 1901. It was one of the first publicly funded galleries in London. The gallery exhibited Pablo Picasso’s Guernica in 1938 as part of a touring exhibition organised by Roland Penrose to protest against the Spanish Civil War. Initiated by members of the Independent Group, the gallery brought Pop Art to the attention of the general public as well as introducing some of the artists, concepts, designers and photographers that would define the Swinging Sixties.
Credit: LeHaye/Wiki Commons
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The Gibraltar Tavern in Gibraltar Walk, Bethnal Green. This pub was present before 1750. The post-war Avebury Estate was extended in 1963. The pub disappeared under the site for the block called Cadogan House.
Credit: (Sourced by) Charlie Goodwin
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Middlesex Street (Petticoat Lane) on the site of Sandy’s Row (1912)
Credit: CA Mathew/Bishopsgate Institute
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Ten Bells pub, Spitalfields (2012) The Jamie Oliver series Jamie’s Great Britain featured his great-great-grandfather was a landlord of the pub during the 1880s. Oliver was shown visiting the Ten Bells to discuss his East London roots, and to see how Londoners lived, drank and ate at the end of the 19th century.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Wordspotandsmith
Licence: CC BY 2.0


A view east along Whitechapel Road including the Pavilion Theatre. The Pavilion was the first major theatre to open in the East End. It opened in 1827 and closed in 1935.
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46 Aldgate High Street
Licence: CC BY 2.0


St Mary’s (Whitechapel) station (1916) This existed between 1884 and 1938 between Aldgate East and Whitechapel.
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