Lambeth North

Underground station, existing between 1906 and now

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(51.499 -0.112, 51.499 -0.112) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Underground station · * · SE1 ·
November
6
2020
Lambeth North is the area surrounding the Imperial War Museum.

Since the 19th century North Lambeth has been one of the names to describe the area around Waterloo station and the shopping district around Lower Marsh market, which was the heart of the original Lambeth village. This area contains many business premises and nationally important locations such as St Thomas’ Hospital, the London Eye, the Royal National Theatre, the Royal Festival Hall, County Hall, Lambeth Palace, and the Imperial War Museum.

Lambeth North tube station serves the area. Designed by Leslie Green, the station was opened by the Baker Street & Waterloo Railway on 10 March 1906, with the name Kennington Road. It served as the temporary southern terminus of the line until 5 August 1906, when Elephant & Castle station was opened. The station’s name was changed to Westminster Bridge Road in July 1906 and it was again renamed, to Lambeth North, in April 1917.

At 4am on 16 January 1941, a German Satan 1800 kg general-purpose bomb hit a hostel at nearby 92 Westminster Bridge Road. The shock-wave severely damaged the southbound platform tunnel injuring 28 people sheltering there, one of whom died in hospital 15 days later. Thirty-seven rings of the damaged tunnel had to be completely replaced, 15 partially replaced, and 86 feet of platform rebuilt. Traffic through the station resumed after 95 days.




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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

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Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Reply
Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Comment
Johna216   
Added: 9 Aug 2017 16:26 GMT   

Thanks!
I have recently started a web site, the info you provide on this site has helped me greatly. Thank you for all of your time & work. There can be no real freedom without the freedom to fail. by Erich Fromm. eeggefeceefb

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Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   

Hurley Road, SE11
There were stables in the road mid way - also Danny reading had a coal delivery lorry.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Comment
Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   

Saunders Street, SE11
I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

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Comment
Lewis   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 20:48 GMT   

Ploy
Allotment

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

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Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

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Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
Lived here
David James Bloomfield   
Added: 13 Jul 2021 11:54 GMT   

Hurstway Street, W10
Jimmy Bloomfield who played for Arsenal in the 1950s was brought up on this street. He was a QPR supporter as a child, as many locals would be at the time, as a teen he was rejected by them as being too small. They’d made a mistake

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Canterbury Music Hall The Canterbury Music Hall was established in 1852 by Charles Morton on the site of a former skittle alley adjacent to the Canterbury Tavern at 143 Westminster Bridge Road.
Christ Church, Lambeth Christ Church was founded by the Rev Dr Christopher Newman Hall in 1876 as a Congregational chapel on Westminster Bridge Road.
Florence Nightingale Museum The Florence Nightingale Museum is located at St Thomas’ Hospital, which faces the Palace of Westminster across the River Thames.
Geraldine Mary Harmsworth Park Geraldine Mary Harmsworth Park is a public park in Kennington.
Lambeth North Lambeth North is the area surrounding the Imperial War Museum.
Lower Marsh Market Lower Marsh Market is in the Waterloo area of London.
Morley College Morley College is an adult education college in south London.
Necropolis Station The London Necropolis Railway was opened in 1854 as a reaction to severe overcrowding in London’s existing graveyards and cemeteries.
St George’s Cathedral The Metropolitan Cathedral Church of St George, usually known as St George’s Cathedral, Southwark is the cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Southwark.
The Angel The Angel was a public house in Webber Street.

THE STREETS OF LAMBETH NORTH
Barbel Street, SE1 Barbel Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Blenheim Business Centre, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Burdett Street, SE1 Burdett Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Centaur Street, SE1 Centaur Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Cosser Street, SE1 Cosser Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Cottesloe Mews, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Dibdin Row, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Greenham Close, SE1 Greenham Close is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Hercules Road, SE1 Hercules Road runs north from Lambeth Road near Lambeth Palace, on the site of Penlington Place.
Kennington Road, SE1 A small section of Kennington Road lies in the SE1 postal area.
King Edward Walk, SE1 King Edward Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Lambeth Road, SE1 Lambeth Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
McAuley Close, SE1 McAuley Close runs north from Cosser Street.
Murphy Street, SE1 This is a street in the [no postcode area
Newnham Terrace, SE1 Newnham Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Oakey Lane, SE1 This is a street in the SE1 postcode area
Pearman Street, SE1 Pearman Street is one of the centres of London.
Railway Arch 213, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
St George’s Mews, SE1 St George’s Mews lies off of Westminster Bridge Road.
The Chandlery, SE1 The Chandlery is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Virgil Street, SE1 Virgil Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Westminster Bridge Road, SE1 Westminster Bridge Road runs on an east-west axis and passes through the boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark.
Whitehorse Mews, SE1 Whitehorse Mews is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.

THE PUBS OF LAMBETH NORTH
Flowers of the forest This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Horse And Stables This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The New Crown & Cushion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Steam Engine This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Walrus This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.




LOCAL PHOTOS
Hopton’s Almshouses
TUM image id: 1513445642
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Ring (1925)
TUM image id: 1509724629
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Church Street (1866)
TUM image id: 1575388511
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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The Hole In The Wall, Waterloo
Credit: Virtual Tourist
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1893 programme cover - Canterbury Theatre
Credit: London Borough of Lambeth
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Gladstone Street showing Albert Terrace in the background (1977)
Credit: Ideal Homes
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Children among the rubble of a legitimised bombsite playground at Lollard Street, Lambeth (1957) Children’s rights campaigner Lady Allen of Hurtwood formed a movement for the building of playgrounds. Originally known as ‘junk’ playgrounds, they were renamed adventure playgrounds in 1953 and the movement grew.
Credit: London Borough of Lambeth
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An unnamed side street off of Fitzalan Street, Lambeth (1921)
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Church Street (1866)
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Peabody Square, Blackfriars Road, Bankside, c.1872
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