Liverpool Street

Underground station, existing between 1874 and now

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Underground station · Liverpool Street · ·
October
13
2012
Liverpool Street station is a mainline railway station and connected London Underground station in the north eastern corner of the City of London.

The station was opened in 1874 by the Great Eastern Railway. It was designed by the Great Eastern's chief engineer, Edward Wilson and was built a site which had been occupied by Bethlem Royal Hospital from the 13th century to the 17th century. A Corporation of London plaque commemorating the station's construction hangs on the wall of the adjoining former Great Eastern Hotel, which was designed by Charles Barry (junior) (son of Sir Charles Barry) and his brother Edward Middleton Barry. The station was named after the street on which it stands, which in turn was named in honour of British Prime Minister Lord Liverpool, having been built as part of an extension of the City of London towards the end of his term in office.

The station was the first place in London to be hit by German Gotha bomber aircraft during World War I. The May 1917 bombing, which saw the station take a direct hit from 1000 pounds of bombs, killed 162 people.

The station was extensively modified between 1985 and 1992, including bringing all the platforms in the main shed up to the same end point and constructing a new underground booking office, but its facade, steam age iron pillars and the honour roll for Great Eastern Railway employees that died in the Great War were retained. It was officially re-opened by Queen Elizabeth in 1991.

Liverpool Street serves destinations in eastern England including Stansted Airport, Cambridge, Lowestoft, Great Yarmouth, Norwich, Ipswich, Chelmsford, Colchester, Braintree, and the port of Harwich, as well as many suburban stations in north-eastern London. It is one of the busiest commuter stations in London.

The connected London Underground station has sub-surface platforms (opened in 1875) on the Circle, Metropolitan and Hammersmith & City lines.

Below the main line and sub-suface station complex are deep level tube platforms for east and westbound Central Line services. The Central Line platforms opened on 28 July 1912, at which time it was the eastern end of what was then known as the Central London Railway.

In the years following the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the United States, two fictional docu-drama portrayed how a terrorist organisation might seek to attack London, chosing Liverpool Street station as the specific target. The programmes turned out to have a degree of truth following the attacks of 7 July 2005.


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

Reply

The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Graham OConnell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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Comment
Marion James   
Added: 12 Mar 2021 17:43 GMT   

26 Edith Street Haggerston
On Monday 11th October 1880 Charlotte Alice Haynes was born at 26 Edith Street Haggerston the home address of her parents her father Francis Haynes a Gilder by trade and her mother Charlotte Alice Haynes and her two older siblings Francis & George who all welcomed the new born baby girl into the world as they lived in part of the small Victorian terraced house which was shared by another family had an outlook view onto the world of the Imperial Gas Works site - a very grey drab reality of the life they were living as an East End working class family - 26 Edith Street no longer stands in 2021 - the small rundown polluted terrace houses of Edith Street are long since gone along with the Gas Companies buildings to be replaced with green open parkland that is popular in 21st century by the trendy residents of today - Charlotte Alice Haynes (1880-1973) is the wife of my Great Grand Uncle Henry Pickett (1878-1930) As I research my family history I slowly begin to understand the life my descendants had to live and the hardships that they went through to survive - London is my home and there are many areas of this great city I find many of my descendants living working and dying in - I am yet to find the golden chalice! But in all truthfulness my family history is so much more than hobby its an understanding of who I am as I gather their stories. Did Charlotte Alice Pickett nee Haynes go on to live a wonderful life - no I do not think so as she became a widow in 1930 worked in a canteen and never remarried living her life in and around Haggerston & Hackney until her death in 1973 with her final resting place at Manor Park Cemetery - I think Charlotte most likely excepted her lot in life like many women from her day, having been born in the Victorian era where the woman had less choice and standing in society, which is a sad state of affairs - So I will endeavour to write about Charlotte and the many other women in my family history to give them the voice of a life they so richly deserve to be recorded !

Edith Street was well situated for the new public transport of two railway stations in 1880 :- Haggerston Railway Station opened in 1867 & Cambridge Heath Railway Station opened in 1872


Reply
Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

Reply
Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

Reply
Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

Reply

   
Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
   
Added: 14 Jan 2022 03:06 GMT   

Goldbourne Gardens W 10
I lived in Goldbourne Gardens in the 50,s very happy big bomb site

Reply

Chris Nash   
Added: 10 Jan 2022 22:54 GMT   

Shortlands Close, DA17
Shortlands Close and the flats along it were constructed in the mid-1990s. Prior to this, the area was occupied by semi-detached houses with large gardens, which dated from the post-war period and were built on the site of Railway Farm. The farm and its buildings spanned the length of Abbey Road, on the south side of the North Kent Line railway tracks.

Reply

Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

Reply

Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

Reply
Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

Reply
Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

Reply
Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

Reply
Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
190 Bishopsgate A 1912 view of the City.
29 Aldgate High Street 29 Aldgate High Street is a demolished property, originally on the north side of Aldgate High Street..
46 Aldgate High Street This Grade II Listed office building is one of the few timber-framed buildings in the City that predates the Great Fire of 1666.
Bank of England The Bank of England is the central bank of the United Kingdom.
Bevis Marks Synagogue Bevis Marks Synagogue is the oldest synagogue in the United Kingdom.
Great Synagogue of London The Great Synagogue of London was, for centuries, the centre of Ashkenazi synagogue and Jewish life in London. It was destroyed during World War II, in the Blitz.
Petticoat Lane Market Petticoat Lane Market is a fashion and clothing market in the East End.
Portsoken Portsoken is one of 25 wards in the City of London, each electing an alderman to the Court of Aldermen and commoners (the City equivalent of a councillor) elected to the Court of Common Council of the City of London Corporation.
St Augustine Papey St Augustine Papey was a mediaeval church in the City of London situated just south of London Wall.
St Botolph’s St. Botolph’s without Aldgate, located on Aldgate High Street, has existed for over a thousand years.
St Mary Axe St Mary Axe was a medieval parish in the City of London whose name survives as that of the street which formerly occupied it.
St Mary Axe St Mary Axe was a mediaeval church situated just north of Leadenhall Street on a site now occupied by Fitzwilliam House.
Tenter Ground Tenter Ground harks back to the seventeenth century when this patch of land was surrounded by weavers’ houses and workshops and used to wash and stretch their fabrics on ’tenters’ to dry.
Wentworth Street Turn-of-the-century fashion in east London.

THE STREETS OF LIVERPOOL STREET
Aldermans Walk, EC2M Alderman’s Walk was formerly Dashwood’s Walk, for Francis Dashwood, who lived here in the 18th century.
Bishopgate, EC2M Bishopgate is location of London.
Bishopsgate Arcade, EC2M Bishopsgate Arcade is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Bishopsgate Churchyard, EC2M Bishopsgate Churchyard is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Bishopsgate, EC2M Bishopsgate was originally the entry point for travellers coming from the north east into London.
Catherine Wheel Alley, EC2M Catherine Wheel Alley is an old alleyway here.
Cutlers Gardens Arcade, EC2M Cutlers Gardens Arcade is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Exchange Place, EC2M Exchange Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Liverpool Street, EC2M Liverpool Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
London Wall Buildings, EC2M London Wall Buildings are a commercial development.
New Street, EC2M New Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Octagon Arcade, EC2M Octagon Arcade is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Sandy’s Street, EC2M Sandy’s Street disappeared when Middlesex Street was extended in the 1890s.
Sun Street Passage, EC2M Sun Street Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Victoria Avenue, E1 This is a street in the EC2M postcode area
Windsor Street, EC2M Windsor Street was formerly a named street of the area.
Wormwood Street, EC2N Wormwood Street refers to the wormwood plant which used to grow on the London Wall and in other areas of wasteland in the City.

THE PUBS OF LIVERPOOL STREET
Astronomer This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Devonshire Terrace This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Dirty Dick’s Established in 1745 as The Old Jerusalem, the drinking house took the name of Dirty Dick’s in 1814.
Dirty Martini Dirty Martini is a pub near Liverpool Street station.
George Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Kings Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Lord Aberconway This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Magpie This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Railway Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Woodins Shades This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
We Are Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.




LOCAL PHOTOS
St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
TUM image id: 1554045418
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Byward Tower, 1893
TUM image id: 1556882285
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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The Great Synagogue of London (1810)
Credit: Thomas Rowlandson (1756â
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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The Aldgate Pump in 1874.
Credit: Wellcome Images
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Bevis Marks Synagogue
Credit: John Salmon
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Exterior of St Katherine Cree, City of London
Credit: Prioryman
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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St James Duke
Credit: Robert William Billings and John Le Keux
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Petticoat Lane in the 1920s
Credit: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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The gravestone of English poet William Blake in Bunhill Fields Burial Ground
Credit: https://careergappers.com/
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Etching of All Hallows Staining tower, drawn in 1922
Credit: Public domain
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Mass grave for plague victims, Holywell Mount (1665) Holywell Mount is the source of the River Walbrook. Today it lies underneath Luke Street in Shoreditch but, then in open land, was used as a plague pit in 1665.
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The Primrose pub on the corner of Norton Folgate/Bishopsgate and Primrose Street (1912) The Primrose, which had existed since at least since 1839, was demolished in 1987
Credit: CA Mathew/Bishopsgate Institute
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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