Hendon Park

Park in/near Hendon Central, existing between 1903 and now

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Park · Hendon Central · NW4 ·
September
1
2017
Hendon Park, totalling 12 hectares, between Queens Road (formerly Butchers Lane) and Shire Hall Lane was created by Hendon Urban District Council in 1903.

Hendon Park was part of a medieval estate known as the Steps Fields and owned by the Goodyer family. From 1868 till 1903 it was owned by the Kemp family when Hendon Council opened the park to the public.

The park has a Holocaust Memorial Garden, which contains a pond, many plants and is enclosed by large hedges. The Childrens’ Millennium Wood planted in 2000 is a native tree and grassland area. The rest of the park is mainly informal parkland, with mown grass and mature trees, especially London plane and lime. It is a good spot for watching pipistrelle bats on a summer evening.

The landscape includes one of the largest specimens of Acer palmatum in London. Many mature trees survive from the original planting, despite damage caused by the Great Storm of 1987 during which many trees were uprooted and destroyed.

"Rout the Rumour", a large propaganda rally was held in Hendon Park on Sunday, 21 July 1940. The rally included songs, music and sketches. It was intended to promote the idea that gossip and rumour harmed the war effort. The Hendon Park cafe was originally a bomb shelter.

Footpaths across Hendon Park, visible on satellite mapping, follow the lines of previously existing pathways.


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Brian Lynch   
Added: 10 Apr 2022 13:38 GMT   

Staples Mattress Factory
An architect’s design of the Staples Mattress Factory
An image found on the website of Dalzell’s Beds, in Armagh Northern Ireland.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Comment
Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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Comment
ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


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Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

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Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Butchers Lane (1923) Photographed in 1923, this stretch of Butchers Lane would soon become Hendon Central Circus and have Watford Way built along the route of the old lane.
Foster House Foster House and Brent Lodge were two 18th-century brick houses at the corner of Butcher's Lane and Brent Street. Butcher's Lane later became Queen’s Road
Hendon Central Hendon Central tube station is on the Edgware branch of the Northern Line.
Hendon Central (1928) Photographed in 1928, this stretch of Watford Way at Hendon Central Circus had recently been built along ancient Butchers Lane and shops were rapidly lining its sides. The United Dairies occupied the domed building, a prestigeous site.
Hendon Park Hendon Park, totalling 12 hectares, between Queens Road (formerly Butchers Lane) and Shire Hall Lane was created by Hendon Urban District Council in 1903.
Renters Farm Near to where Brent Cross Shopping Centre is today was a farm called Renter’s.

NEARBY STREETS
Allington Road, NW4 Allington Road dates from the early 1920s
Beaufort Gardens, NW4 Beaufort Gardens is a street in Hendon.
Bethel Close, NW4 Bethel Close is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Brent Cross Gardens, NW4 Brent Cross Gardens was a new section of road, built at the same time as the Brent Cross Flyover.
Brent Green, NW4 Brent Green is a street in Hendon.
Central Circus, NW4 Central Circus is the postal designation for addresses around Hendon Central circus.
Century Close, NW4 Century Close is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Cheyne Walk, NW4 Cheyne Walk is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Clive Lodge, NW11 Clive Lodge is a block next to Brent Cross Flyover.
Cooper Road, NW4 Cooper Road sits on the pre-1965 alignment of Hendon Way.
Danescroft Avenue, NW4 Danescroft Avenue is a street in Hendon.
Danescroft, NW4 Danescroft is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Denehurst Gardens, NW4 Denehurst Gardens is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Elm Close, NW4 Elm Close is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Elm Park Gardens, NW4 Elm Park Gardens is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Elms Avenue, NW4 Elms Avenue is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Fairfield Avenue, NW4 Fairfield Avenue dates from the 1920s.
Golders Rise, NW4 Golders Rise is a street in Hendon.
Graham Road, NW4 Graham Road dates from before the First World War.
Green Lane, NW4 Green Lane is a street in Hendon.
Haley Road, NW4 Haley Road runs along a sliproad from Hendon Way.
Haslemere Avenue, NW4 Haslemere Avenue is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Heathfield Gardens, NW11 Heathfield Gardens is a street in Golders Green.
Hendon Way, NW4 Hendon Way is a major route through Hendon.
Holmdale Gardens, NW4 Holmdale Gardens is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Mayfield Gardens, NW4 Mayfield Gardens is a street in Hendon.
Park View Gardens, NW4 Park View Gardens is a street in Hendon.
Queens Gardens, NW4 Queens Gardens is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Queens Parade, NW4 Queens Parade is a parade of shops along Queens Road, Hendon.
Queens Road, NW4 Queens Road was formerly known as Butcher’s Lane.
Queens Way, NW4 Queens Way leads off Queens Road.
Renters Avenue, NW4 Renters Avenue lies on the land of the former Renter’s Farm.
Shirehall Close, NW4 Shirehall Close is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Shirehall Gardens, NW4 Shirehall Gardens is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Shirehall Lane, NW4 Shirehall Lane is a street in Hendon.
Shirehall Park, NW4 Shirehall Park is a street in Hendon.
Sinclair Grove, NW11 Sinclair Grove runs from Western Avenue to Golders Green Road.
Spalding Road, NW4 Spalding Road is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Sydney Grove, NW4 Sydney Grove is the western extension of Heriot Road.
The Approach, NW4 The Approach is a street in Hendon.
Water Brook Lane, NW4 Water Brook Lane is a road in the NW4 postcode area
West Avenue, NW4 West Avenue is a street in Hendon.

NEARBY PUBS
Gallery This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Arena Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Bodhran This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hendon This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Hendon Central

Hendon Central tube station is on the Edgware branch of the Northern Line.

Hendon Central, like all stations north from Golders Green, is a surface station (although the tracks enter twin tunnels a short distance further north on the way to Colindale). When it was built it stood in lonely glory amid fields, as one writer puts it, south of the old village of Hendon, which has since been swallowed up by London’s suburbs.

The station is a Grade II listed building, designed in a neo-Georgian style by Stanley Heaps, who also designed Brent Cross tube station in a similar style, with a prominent portico featuring a Doric colonnade.

The fact that the area was largely undeveloped allowed a hitherto unusual degree of coordination between the station and the surrounding buildings that were constructed over the next few years. The station was intended to be the centre and a key architectural feature of a new suburban town; it faces a circus 73 metres in diameter that is intersected by four approach roads which provide access to all parts of Hendon and the surrounding areas beyond. For many years this was a roundabout known as ’Central Circus’; however it is now a crossroads controlled by traffic signals.

Writing in 1932, William Passingham commended the integrated approach taken at Hendon Central as an outstanding example of the co-ordination of road-planning with passenger station requirements. He noted, only nine years after the station opened, that it had already become the centre of an ever-widening cluster of new houses.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Hendon Central (1923)
TUM image id: 1489498425
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Brent station
TUM image id: 1489498511
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Sinclair Grove in more halcyon days
TUM image id: 1574867078
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The site of Hendon Central station (1896) The future site of the 1920s Hendon Central station (at the red marker) was anticipated on the late nineteenth century Ordnance Survey map of the area. Butcher’s Lane, later to be Queen’s Road, headed west out of Hendon proper and made a sharp northward turn towards The Burroughs on the later site of Hendon Central Circus. The site is marked with GP (Guide Post) where a sign post pointed the way. Goosebury Gardens, at the bottom of the map, was located north of what became Brent Cross Flyover. The lane which ran north all the way The Burroughs became the route of Watford Way. The North Circular Road, Watford Way and the new Hendon Central station were all part of a coordinated 1920s scheme, transforming the area completely.
Credit: Ordnance Survey
TUM image id: 1656756550
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Brent Cross (1947) Brent Cross roundabout was named after its nearby river, the Brent. The junction was transformed by a flyover over the North Circular Road followed by the 1970s construction of Brent Cross Shopping Centre. The latter was built next to Hendon’s former greyhound stadium.
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Hendon Central Circus (1928) This image looks north along Watford Way, some four years after construction - when the new road contained widely separated carriageways with a building between the two
Credit: London Transport Museum
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Hendon Central (1923)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Hendon House (1890)
Credit: Louise surrey
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The site of Hendon Central station (1896) The future site of the 1920s Hendon Central station (at the red marker) was anticipated on the late nineteenth century Ordnance Survey map of the area. Butcher’s Lane, later to be Queen’s Road, headed west out of Hendon proper and made a sharp northward turn towards The Burroughs on the later site of Hendon Central Circus. The site is marked with GP (Guide Post) where a sign post pointed the way. Goosebury Gardens, at the bottom of the map, was located north of what became Brent Cross Flyover. The lane which ran north all the way The Burroughs became the route of Watford Way. The North Circular Road, Watford Way and the new Hendon Central station were all part of a coordinated 1920s scheme, transforming the area completely.
Credit: Ordnance Survey
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