Schweppes Factory

Factory in/near West Hendon, existed between 1896 and the 1980s

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Factory · West Hendon · ·
MARCH
17
2013
In 1896, Schweppes opened a large mineral water factory at the top of Wilberforce Road in West Hendon. It was a site chosen near an artesian well and because of its proximity to Edgware Road and the Midland Railway.

Deerfield Cottages were built for Schweppes's employees. St. John's school, West Hendon was enlarged to cater for the children of workers at the new Schweppes's factory and there were 359 pupils by 1906.

The original factory was situated behind a side branch of the Welsh Harp Reservoir which was infilled. The factory was expanded up to the Edgware Road after this.



Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Martina   
Added: 13 Jul 2017 21:22 GMT   

Schweppes factory
The site is now a car shop and Angels Fancy Dress shop and various bread factories are there.

Reply

Brian Lynch   
Added: 10 Apr 2022 13:38 GMT   

Staples Mattress Factory
An architect’s design of the Staples Mattress Factory
An image found on the website of Dalzell’s Beds, in Armagh Northern Ireland.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Bob Land   
Added: 29 Jun 2022 13:20 GMT   

Map legends
Question, I have been looking at quite a few maps dated 1950 and 1900, and there are many abbreviations on the maps, where can I find the lists to unravel these ?

Regards

Bob Land

Reply
Comment
Alison   
Added: 26 Jun 2022 18:20 GMT   

On the dole in north London
When I worked at the dole office in Medina Road in the 1980s, "Archway" meant the social security offices which were in Archway Tower at the top of the Holloway Road. By all accounts it was a nightmare location for staff and claimants alike. This was when Margaret Thatcher’s government forced unemployment to rise to over 3 million (to keep wages down) and computerised records where still a thing of the future. Our job went from ensuring that unemployed people got the right sort and amount of benefits at the right time, to stopping as many people as possible from getting any sort of benefit at all. Britain changed irrevocably during this period and has never really recovered. We lost the "all in it together" frame of mind that had been born during the second world war and became the dog-eat-dog society where 1% have 95% of the wealth and many people can’t afford to feed their children. For me, the word Archway symbolises the land of lost content.

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Comment
Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 19 Jun 2022 16:58 GMT   

Runcorn Place, W11
Runcorn place

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Comment
   
Added: 30 May 2022 19:03 GMT   

The Three Magpies
Row of houses (centre) was on Heathrow Rd....Ben’s Cafe shack ( foreground ) and the Three Magpies pub (far right) were on the Bath Rd

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Comment
Watts   
Added: 17 May 2022 20:29 GMT   

Baeethoven St School, also an Annex for Paddington College of FE.
In the early 70’s I took a two year science course at Paddington CFE. The science classes were held on weekday evenings at Beethoven Street school, overseen by chemistry teacher, Mr Tattershall.

Reply

   
Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

Reply
Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Silk Stream Silk Stream is just over 4 kilometres long and lies entirely within the current London Borough of Barnet.
St John, Hendon St John is a church built by Temple Moore (1856–1920) was an English architect who was born in Tullamore, Ireland.

NEARBY STREETS
Algernon Road, NW4 Algernon Road is a street in Hendon.
Audley Road, NW4 Audley Road is a street in Hendon.
Bertram Road, NW4 Bertram Road is a street in Hendon.
Colin Drive, NW9 Colin Drive is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Connaught Business Centre, NW9 Connaught Business Centre is a location in London.
Dartmouth Road, NW4 Dartmouth Road is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Deerfield Close, NW9 Deerfield Close is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Edgeworth Avenue, NW4 Edgeworth Avenue is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Edgeworth Close, NW4 Edgeworth Close is a street in Hendon.
Faber Gardens, NW4 Faber Gardens is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Gadsbury Close, NW9 Gadsbury Close is a street in Kingsbury.
Garrick Road, NW9 Garrick Road is a street in Kingsbury.
Goldsmith Avenue, NW9 Goldsmith Avenue is a street in Kingsbury.
Herbert Road, NW9 Herbert Road is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Hollyview Close, NW4 Hollyview Close is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Hyde Crescent, NW9 Hyde Crescent is a street in Kingsbury.
Hyde Estate Road, NW9 Commercial area
Hyde House, NW9 Hyde House is a block on Rushgrove Avenue
Ingledene Close, NW4 Ingledene Close is a location in London.
Irving Way, NW9 Irving Way is a street in Kingsbury.
Malcolm Crescent, NW4 Malcolm Crescent is a road in the NW4 postcode area
Marriotts Close, NW9 Marriotts Close is a post-war development.
Marsh Drive, NW9 Marsh Drive is a street in Kingsbury.
Montagu Road, NW4 Montagu Road is a street in Hendon.
Pheasant Square, NW9 Pheasant Square is a location in London.
Ramsay Road, NW9 Ramsay Road was the northernmost of a series of disappeared streets in West Hendon.
Ramsey Close, NW9 Ramsey Close consists of two storey semi-detached houses built in the 1980s.
Rookery Close, NW9 Rookery Close is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Rookery Way, NW9 Rookery Way is a street in Kingsbury.
Russell Road, NW9 Russell Road is a street in Kingsbury.
Silk Bridge Retail Park, NW9 Silk Bridge Retail Park is a location in London.
Station Road, NW4 Station Road led from the centre of Hendon village to its first station and to the Edgware Road.
Station Road, NW9 Station Road was formerly called Burroughs Lane and led from the Burroughs to Edgware Road south of Silk Bridge.
Talbot Crescent, NW4 Talbot Crescent is a street in Hendon.
The Hyde, NW9 The Hyde is a street in Kingsbury.
Vaughan Avenue, NW4 Vaughan Avenue is a street in Hendon.
Vicarage Road, NW4 Vicarage Road is a street in Hendon.
Wilberforce Road, NW9 Wilberforce Road is a street in Kingsbury.
Woodward Avenue, NW4 Woodward Avenue is a street in Hendon.

NEARBY PUBS
Funky Brownz This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Midland Hotel This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


West Hendon

West Hendon - or New Hendon to the older folk. Or The Hyde to those older folk's grandparents.

West Hendon was a settlement within that part of the ancient parish of Hendon known as the Hyde, and is now a part of the London Borough of Barnet.

It was formally known, from 1878–1890, as New Hendon, a small railway development on the Edgware Road. Before the 1830s there were three farms, Upper and Lower Guttershedge (east of the road) and Cockman’s in the Wood (west of the road) and an inn, The Welsh Harp. Between 1835 and 1838, the Brent Reservoir was constructed by damming the Brent and the Silk brooks and flooding much of Cockman’s Farm. The water was used to supply the Grand Union Canal. At its greatest extent, in 1853, it covered 400 acres but was dramatically reduced to 195 acres in the 1890s. Subsequently it has been reduced to 110 acres. It contains enough water to fill 3 million baths and in 1991 was believed to contain 10,000 lb of fish.

The residue of Cockman’s Farm became Woodfield House, home to the Roman Catholic Passioist Fathers (1852 and 1858). The house was demolished in 1940 and the site used by the Borough of Hendon and its successor the London Borough of Barnet as a plant nursery.

Originally The Harp and Horn (c1750s), The Welsh Harp was rebuilt in 1859 and again in 1937, before finally being pulled down in 1970 to make way for the M1. During the 1960s, it was known as The Lakeside Scene and hosted some of the great rock and blues bands of the day, such as the Yardbirds. From 1859 until the end of the century it was run by the Warner brothers, and the reservoir became a centre for all sorts of sporting events such as ice skating, swimming and angling; it was, until 1878, the Kingsbury Race Course and the first mechanical hare in greyhound racing was used there in 1876. By 1850, there was a second public house, the Upper Welsh Harp. At its height in the mid-1880s crowds in excess of 25,000 people could be expected on a Bank Holiday weekend.

Two railway stations were opened, both of the Midland Railway: Hendon (1868), and Welsh Harp (1870). A local builder called Bishop laid the first brick of a new terrace called Neeld Terrace (1881), which heralded the start of New Hendon. Brent Vue was built on land originally owned by the Midland Company. In 1885, the Baptists had a mission hall and their present hall was opened in 1930. By 1886, there were 200 new houses and the Anglican church of St. John’s was built.

In 1896 Schweppes opened a large mineral water factory, and the present Anglican church of St. John’s was established in Algernon Road. With a planned tram line along the West Hendon Broadway due to open in 1904, Welsh Harp station was closed in 1903, and West Hendon became a thriving Edwardian retail district until overshadowed by Golders Green.

During World War II, on 13 February 1941, the Luftwaffe dropped an SC2500 Maximum Heavy Explosive bomb (equivalent to two V2 rockets), killing 80 people and destroying 40 houses in an area west of the Edgware Road. This area was completely redeveloped in the 1960s.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
West Hendon from above (1930s) The terraces of houses shown mostly disappeared after the Second World War.
Credit: Britain From Above/Aerofilms
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St. John the Evangelist, an Anglican church located on the end of Algernon Road, next to Vicarage Road.
Credit: Martin Addison
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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