Roe Green

Neighbourhood in/near Colindale, existing until now

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(51.58983 -0.26625, 51.589 -0.266) 

Roe Green

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Neighbourhood · Colindale · NW9 ·
JANUARY
15
2018
Roe Green was an original garden village.

In 1915, the Aircraft Manufacturing Company occupied over 100,000 square feet of factory employing 600 people and was producing 20 machines per month. In 1916, the Office of Works commissioned its principal architect, Sir Francis Baines to design an estate of cottages for the aircraft workers. This was done along garden village lines at Roe Green.

The term garden village represented an important concept of estate design. British Town Planning was in its infancy and there were few controls on building form save the local bye-laws. In this regard, the work of Baines should be judged in the context of the Garden City movement inspired by Ebenezer Howard. Baines' concept of estate design was refined with practice. Roe Green itself was based on his office's design for Woolwich Garden Suburb (the Well Hall Estate) which was built for the Arsenal (the Ordnance factory not the football club) in 1915.

The buildings at Roe Green were deliberately designed in a combination of brick or rendered walls and slate roofs sweeping down to first floor level or a combination of similar materials with tiled roofs and vertical tile hanging.

A contemporary issue of 'The Builder' described the plan in detail:-

The site is almost level, its chief natural features being some fine trees in the two main hedges which run parallel to the sides of the site. These have determined the main line of the roads which follow the hedges, and it has been found possible to preserve every tree with one exception, and that one which could only have lasted for a time. A clump of trees with hedges cutting it at right angles has been made the nucleus of the village green, where the inn will be built. With the exception of this inn the six shops placed in Stag Lane and a doctor's house, the whole of the accommodation provided is residential, consisting of 250 houses the tenements, divided into different classes of accommodation.

There were five classes altogether. In classes 1 and 2, of which there were 110, the accommodation on the ground floor consisted of a living room, parlour, scullery and offices/coal cupboard. Three bedrooms and a combined bathroom and WC were provided on the first floor of class 1 cottages with one less bedroom on the first floor of cottage type No-2. Of class 3, there were 40 cottages built containing a large living room, scullery with bath under the kitchen table, coal cupboard and WC and on the first floor three bedrooms. Classes 4 and 5, of which about 100 were built, were two-bedroom flats with living room, scullery with bath under the kitchen table, WC and coal cupboard. Nowadays the old scullery, copper and coal cupboard are less familiar features and a variety of internal alterations have occurred in many of the properties to improve the living and bathroom arrangements.

Of the external environment 'The Builder' commented:- Houses are generally arranged in groups of four, an economical division enabling access to the back gardens to be obtained with a minimum amount of inconvenience. To obtain direct access to all gardens it would have been necessary to provide a passage in the centre of each block, or a system of pathways between the ends of the gardens. In the first case, land and also walling would be wasted; in the second, land and fencing and in this and other points of this careful and wisely considered scheme a reasonable means has been attained. Vistas have been carefully considered, and small practical points, such as the arrangement of dustbins for convenient collection, have been attended to.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


Roe Green</SPAN>

Roe Green

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Colindale

Colindale is an area of north London lying to the northwest of Hendon.

Formerly in the borough and ancient parish of Hendon, Colindale was essentially the dale between Mill Hill and Burroughs. By the middle of the 20th century, it had come to include that part of the Edgware Road between The Hyde, and Burnt Oak.

The area is named after a 16th century family of the same name. Until the 20th century Collindale, was without any buildings save for a large house called Collindale Lodge, Collindale Farm, and a few cottages. (A spelling with two L’s has been used, as on this printed in 1873.) All of these properties were on Collindeep Lane, which had in the medieval period been an alternative route out of London (via Hampstead, Golders Green, and Hendon) to the Edgware Road. By the end of the 16th century it was not often used as a main road, and by the middle part of the 19th century was called Ancient Street.

By the end of the 19th century cheap land prices made Colindale attractive to developers. Colindale Hospital was started in 1898 as an asylum for the long term sick of central London, and The Government Lymph Establishment for making vaccines was built in 1907. By 1996 the majority of the hospital was closed, and at present lies mostly derelict. In 1902 the British Museum built a new depository, and kept the newspaper collection there from 1934.

Garstin’s Ltd established a trunk factory in 1901, as well as a row of cottages called Leatherville, as such they constitute the first manufacturer in the Collindale. By 1914 there was already housing between Colindale Avenue and Annesley avenues mostly to house the workers of these endeavours. Immediately after the First World War a number of other manufacturing companies came to Colindale. Franco Illuminated Signs came to Aerodrome Road in 1922. They made their money making the lights for the Franco British Exhibition (1909), from which they took their name (later abbreviated to Franco). They were best known for the neon signs to be found in Piccadilly from the 1920s to the 1970s. Frigidaire started in a wooden shack in Aerodrome Road, employing 11 people in 1923, and selling the first automatic household fridges in England. The reason why many of these and other companies chose Colindale was that there was land available for expansion. However by 1923 the tube railway reached Colindale, land prices increased and factory expansion was not realisable. A number of industries looked elsewhere for premises. In 1931 Fridgdaire, for example, decided to build a new manufacturing plant on the Edgware Road and had moved its entire operations there by 1946.

Colindale station opened on 18 August 1924 on what was then the Hampstead and Highgate Line as the first station on the second section of the Underground’s extension to Edgware.

After the station opened suburban development was rapid, and by 1939 much of the western side was semi-detached housing. Typical is the Colin Park Estate built by F. H. Stucke & Co, built around Colindeep Lane (1927). A number of the houses on this estate are by the architect E. G. Trobridge. St Matthias started as a mission church in 1905. Its permanent building was opened in 1934 and rebuilt 1971-3. Colindale infants’ school was started in Colindeep Lane in 1921, with a new building constructed in Woodfield Avenue in 1933. In September of 1940 Colindale tube station and the Newpaper Library (rebuilt 1957) were bombed, and the site was visited by George VI and Queen Elizabeth, the late Queen Mother. The V1 flying bombs hit Colindale Hospital on 1 July 1944 killing four members of the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force.

Places of interest include the British Library newspaper depository, the Royal Air Force Museum, Barnet College, and the Peel Centre (better known as Hendon Police College).

A small brook, a tributary of the River Brent called the Silk Stream, runs north to south. Here also is the Grahame Park Estate, built on the former Hendon Aerodrome.


LOCAL PHOTOS
The Plough - reputedly 800 years old
TUM image id: 1517936032
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Edgware Road in Colindale
TUM image id: 1517936686
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The Plough - reputedly 800 years old
TUM image id: 1517936032
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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