Pitfield Street, N1

An area which may have existed since the nineteenth century or before- in this area, buildings are mainly post-war

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(51.53162 -0.08295, 51.531 -0.082) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · Hoxton · N1 ·
FEBRUARY
5
2021
Pitfield Street is a north-south street running through Islington.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Comment
Marion James   
Added: 12 Mar 2021 17:43 GMT   

26 Edith Street Haggerston
On Monday 11th October 1880 Charlotte Alice Haynes was born at 26 Edith Street Haggerston the home address of her parents her father Francis Haynes a Gilder by trade and her mother Charlotte Alice Haynes and her two older siblings Francis & George who all welcomed the new born baby girl into the world as they lived in part of the small Victorian terraced house which was shared by another family had an outlook view onto the world of the Imperial Gas Works site - a very grey drab reality of the life they were living as an East End working class family - 26 Edith Street no longer stands in 2021 - the small rundown polluted terrace houses of Edith Street are long since gone along with the Gas Companies buildings to be replaced with green open parkland that is popular in 21st century by the trendy residents of today - Charlotte Alice Haynes (1880-1973) is the wife of my Great Grand Uncle Henry Pickett (1878-1930) As I research my family history I slowly begin to understand the life my descendants had to live and the hardships that they went through to survive - London is my home and there are many areas of this great city I find many of my descendants living working and dying in - I am yet to find the golden chalice! But in all truthfulness my family history is so much more than hobby its an understanding of who I am as I gather their stories. Did Charlotte Alice Pickett nee Haynes go on to live a wonderful life - no I do not think so as she became a widow in 1930 worked in a canteen and never remarried living her life in and around Haggerston & Hackney until her death in 1973 with her final resting place at Manor Park Cemetery - I think Charlotte most likely excepted her lot in life like many women from her day, having been born in the Victorian era where the woman had less choice and standing in society, which is a sad state of affairs - So I will endeavour to write about Charlotte and the many other women in my family history to give them the voice of a life they so richly deserve to be recorded !

Edith Street was well situated for the new public transport of two railway stations in 1880 :- Haggerston Railway Station opened in 1867 & Cambridge Heath Railway Station opened in 1872


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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
roger morris   
Added: 16 Oct 2021 08:50 GMT   

Atherton Road, IG5 (1958 - 1980)
I moved to Atherton road in 1958 until 1980 from Finsbury Park. My father purchased the house from his brother Sydney Morris. My father continued to live there until his death in 1997, my mother having died in 1988.
I attended The Glade Primary School in Atherton Road from sept 1958 until 1964 when I went to Beal School. Have fond memories of the area and friends who lived at no2 (Michael Clark)and no11 (Brian Skelly)

Reply
Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

Reply
Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

Reply
Comment
Simon Chalton   
Added: 10 Oct 2021 21:52 GMT   

Duppas Hill Terrace 1963- 74
I’m 62 yrs old now but between the years 1963 and 1975 I lived at number 23 Duppas Hill Terrace. I had an absolutely idyllic childhood there and it broke my heart when the council ordered us out of our home to build the Ellis Davd flats there.The very large house overlooked the fire station and we used to watch them practice putting out fires in the blue tower which I believe is still there.
I’m asking for your help because I cannot find anything on the internet or anywhere else (pictures, history of the house, who lived there) and I have been searching for many, many years now.
Have you any idea where I might find any specific details or photos of Duppas Hill Terrace, number 23 and down the hill to where the subway was built. To this day it saddens me to know they knocked down this house, my extended family lived at the next house down which I think was number 25 and my best school friend John Childs the next and last house down at number 27.
I miss those years so terribly and to coin a quote it seems they just disappeared like "tears in rain".
Please, if you know of anywhere that might be able to help me in any way possible, would you be kind enough to get back to me. I would be eternally grateful.
With the greatest of hope and thanks,
Simon Harlow-Chalton.


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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

Reply
Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

Reply
Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Courtyard Theatre The Courtyard is a theatre housed in the former Passmore Edwards Free Library.

NEARBY STREETS
Academy Buildings, N1 Academy Buildings is a large block of brick warehouses.
Archer Apartments, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Ashford Street, N1 Ashford Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Aske Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Aurora Buildings, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Bache’s Street, N1 This is a street in the N1 postcode area
Basing House Yard, E2 Basing House Yard is a road in the E2 postcode area
Bevenden Street, N1 Bevenden Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Bletchley Court, N1 Bletchley Court is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Bookham Street, N1 Bookham Street disappeared after the Second World War.
Bowling Green Walk, N1 Bowling Green Walk is a road in the N1 postcode area
Bracklyn Street, N1 Bracklyn Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Bridport Place, N1 Bridport Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Britannia Gardens, N1 Britannia Gardens once led to the Britannia Theatre.
Britannia Walk, N1 Britannia Walk is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Buckland Street, N1 Buckland Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Buttesland Street, N1 Buttesland Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Catherine House Whitmore Estate, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Cavendish Street, N1 Cavendish Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Chart Street, N1 Chart Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cherbury Street, N1 Cherbury Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Clunbury Street, N1 Clunbury Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Corsham Street, N1 Corsham Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cottons Gardens, E2 Cottons Gardens is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Cranston Estate, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Cremer Business Centre, E2 Cremer Business Centre is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Cremer Street, E2 Cremer Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Crondall Street, N1 Crondall Street is one of the older streets of the area.
Cropley Court, N1 Cropley Court is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cropley Street, N1 Cropley Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cullum Welch Court, N1 Cullum Welch Court is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Custance Street, N1 Custance Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Drysdale Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Drysdale Street, N1 Drysdale Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
East Road, N1 East Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Ebenezer Street, EC1V A street within the N1 postcode
Ely Place, N1 Ely Place dates from the 1860s but the name dates from 1669.
Enfield Cloisters, N1 Enfield Cloisters is a road in the N1 postcode area
Evelyn Court, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Evelyn Walk, N1 Evelyn Walk is a road in the N1 postcode area
Falkirk Street, N1 Falkirk Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Fanshaw Street, N1 Fanshaw Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Forston Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Fullwoods Mews, N1 Fullwoods Mews is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Geffrye Court, N1 Geffrye Court is a road in the N1 postcode area
Geffrye Estate, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Geffrye Street, E2 Geffrye Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Glassworks Studios, E2 Glassworks Studios is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Gopsall Street, N1 Gopsall Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Grange Street, N1 Grange Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Haberdasher Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Haberdasher Street, N1 Haberdasher Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Hamond Square, N1 Hamond Square is a road in the N1 postcode area
Hare Walk, N1 Hare Walk is a road in the N1 postcode area
Hemsworth Street, N1 Hemsworth Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Hobbs Place Estate, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Hoffman Square, N1 Hoffman Square is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Homefield Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Hoxton Square, N1 Hoxton Square is a garden square laid out in 1683
Hoxton Street, N1 Hoxton Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Ivy Street, N1 Ivy Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Jasper Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Juliet House, N1 Residential block
Kingsland Road, E2 Kingsland Road stretches north from the junction with Old Street, Hackney Road and Shoreditch High Street.
Land of Promise, N1 The Land of Promise - a short cul-de-sac - got its curious name from its former existence as a piece of land.
Long Street, E2 Long Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Lynedoch Street, E2 Lynedoch Street used to lie behind the Shoreditch Workhouse.
Mail Coach Yard, E2 Mail Coach Yard is a road in the E2 postcode area
Mail Coach Yard, N1 Mail Coach Yard is a road in the N1 postcode area
Mintern Street, N1 Mintern Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Monteagle Court, N1 Monteagle Court is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Mundy Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Murray Grove, N1 Murray Grove is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Myrtle Walk, N1 Myrtle Walk was built over the line of Myrtle Street when the Arden Estate was built.
Nazrul Street, E2 Nazrul Street is a road in the E2 postcode area
New North Road, N1 New North Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Nile Street, N1 Nile Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Nuttall Street, E2 Nuttall Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Nuttall Street, N1 Nuttall Street is a road in the E2 postcode area
Ormsby Street, E2 Ormsby Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Osric Path, N1 Osric Path is a walkway within the Arden Estate.
Parr Street, N1 Parr Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Pearson Street, E2 Pearson Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Perseverance Works, E2 Perseverance Works is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Phillipp Street, N1 Phillipp Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Pimlico Walk, N1 Pimlico Walk was curtailed in length with the coming of the Arden Estate.
Provost & East Building, Provost & East Building lies within the postcode.
Provost Estate, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Provost Street, N1 Provost Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Purcell Street, N1 Purcell Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Redvers Street, E2 A street within the N1 postcode
Regan Way, N1 Regan Way is a road in the N1 postcode area
Retford Street, E2 A street within the N1 postcode
Rushton Street, N1 Rushton Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Sara Lane Studios, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Shaftesbury Street, N1 Shaftesbury Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Shenfield Street, N1 Shenfield Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Shepherdess Place, N1 Shepherdess Place is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Silbury Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Square Studio, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
St. John’s Estate, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Stanway Street, N1 Stanway Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Stringer House, N1 Residential block
Timber Yard, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Tyssen Street, N1 Tyssen Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Union Central, E2 Union Central is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Union Walk, E2 Union Walk is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Vestry Street, N1 Vestry Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Waterson Street, E2 Waterson Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Wenlock Street, N1 Wenlock Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Westland Place, N1 Westland Place is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Wilks Place, N1 Wilks Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Wilmer Gardens, N1 Wilmer Gardens is a road in the N1 postcode area
Wimbourne Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode

NEARBY PUBS
Bavarian Beerhouse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bill’s Restaurant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Charlie Wright’s International This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Dream Bags Jaguar Shoes This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
George & Vulture This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Howl at the Moon This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Iambic Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lion & Lamb This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lion & Lamb This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Mkm Entertainment Ltd This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Prague Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Beehive This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Duke of Wellington This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Macbeth This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Shoreditch Station This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The White Horse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ye Old Axe This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Hoxton

Hoxton is a district in the East End of London, immediately north of the financial district of the City of London.

Hogesdon is first recorded in the Domesday Book, meaning an Anglo-Saxon farm belonging to 'Hoch', or 'Hocq'. Little is recorded of the origins of the settlement, though there was Roman activity around Ermine Street, which ran to the east of the area from the 1st century. In medieval times, Hoxton formed a rural part of Shoreditch parish.

In 1415, the Lord Mayor of London caused the wall of the City to be broken towards Moorfields, and built the postern called Moorgate, for the ease of the citizens to walk that way upon causeways towards Islington and Hoxton – at that time, still marshy areas. The residents responded by harassing walkers to protect their fields. A century later, the hedges and ditches were destroyed, by order of the City, to enable City dwellers to partake in leisure at Hoxton.

By Tudor times many moated manor houses existed to provide ambassadors and courtiers country air nearby the City. The open fields to the north and west were frequently used for archery practice, and on 22 September 1598 the playwright Ben Jonson fought a fatal duel in Hoxton Fields, killing actor Gabriel Spencer. Jonson was able to prove his literacy, thereby claiming benefit of clergy to escape a hanging.

On 26 October 1605 Hoxton achieved notoriety, when a letter arrived at the home of local resident William Parker, Lord Monteagle warning him not to attend the Parliament summoned by James I to convene on 5 November, because "yet I say they shall receive a terrible blow, the Parliament, and yet they shall not see who hurts them". The letter may have been sent by his brother-in-law Francis Tresham, or he may have written it himself, to curry favour. The letter was read aloud at supper, before prominent Catholics, and then he delivered it personally to Robert Cecil at Whitehall. While the conspirators were alerted, by the public reading, to the existence of the letter they persevered with their plot as their gunpowder remained undiscovered. William Parker accompanied Thomas Howard, the Lord Chamberlain, at his visit to the undercroft of Parliament, where Guy Fawkes was found in the early hours of 5 November. Most of the conspirators fled on the discovery of the Gunpowder Plot, but Francis Tresham was arrested a few days later at his house in Hoxton.

By the end of the 17th century the nobility's estates began to be broken up. Many of these large houses became to be used as schools, hospitals or mad houses, with almshouses being built on the land between by benefactors, most of whom were City liverymen. Aske's Almshouses were built on Pitfield Street in 1689 from Robert Aske's endowment for 20 poor haberdashers and a school for 20 children of freemen. Hoxton House, was established as a private asylum in 1695. It was owned by the Miles family, and expanded rapidly into the surrounding streets being described by Coleridge as the Hoxton madhouse. Here fee-paying 'gentle and middle class' people took their exercise in the extensive grounds between Pitfield Street and Kingsland Road;[14] including the poet Charles Lamb. Over 500 pauper lunatics resided in closed wards, and it remained the Naval Lunatic Asylum until 1818. The asylum closed in 1911; and the only remains are by Hackney Community College, where a part of the house was incorporated into the school that replaced it in 1921. At this time Hoxton Square and Charles Square were laid out, forming a fashionable area. Non-conformist sects were attracted to the area, away from the restrictions of the City's regulations.

In the Victorian era the railways made travelling to distant suburbs easier, and this combined with infill building and industrialisation to drive away the wealthier classes, leaving Hoxton a concentration of the poor with many slums. The area became a centre for the furniture trade.

Manufacturing developments in the years after the Second World War meant that many of the small industries that characterised Hoxton moved out. By the early 1980s, these industrial lofts and buildings came to be occupied by young artists as inexpensive live/work spaces, while exhibitions, raves and clubs occupied former office and retail space at the beginning of the 1990s. During this time Joshua Compston established his Factual Nonsense gallery on Charlotte Road in Shoreditch and organised art fetes in Hoxton Square. Their presence gradually drew other creative industries into the area, especially magazines, design firms, and dot-coms.

By the end of the 20th century, the southern half of Hoxton had become a vibrant arts and entertainment district boasting a large number of bars, nightclubs, restaurants, and art galleries.

The northern half of the district is more residential and consists largely of council housing estates and new-build private residences.

Hoxton railway station is in the Hoxton district of the London Borough of Hackney. The station is located on the Kingsland Viaduct and is served by London Overground trains on the extended East London Line, under the control of the London Rail division of Transport for London. The station is situated at the back of the Geffrye Museum and is on Geffrye Street near to Dunloe Street and Cremer Street.

The station was officially opened to the public on 27 April 2010, initially with week-day services running between Dalston Junction and New Cross or New Cross Gate. On 23 May 2010 services were extended from New Cross Gate to West Croydon or Crystal Palace.


LOCAL PHOTOS
St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
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Crondall Street
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The Crown public house.
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Ely Place dates from the 1860s but the name dates from 1669. On 11 November 1651, property owner Thomas Robinson sold a portion of his land to one Francis Kirkman. It was described as a "parcel of ground 34 feet wide and from 74 to 84 feet long (...) and the entry way from Hoxton Street between the houses, and a garden plot of one acre extending eastwards to Kingsland Highway". In 1665, the Joiners’ Company purchased an estate at Hoxton and in 1669, sold it on to the overseers of the poor of the Liberty of Saffron Hill, Hatton Garden and Ely Rents. This forms the basis for Ely Place and the land to its north (part of which was developed into the Shoreditch Workhouse). Obliterated during Second World War bombing, 1974 saw an area including Lynedoch Street and Ely Place redeveloped.
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Lynedoch Street, Hoxton (1921)
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Fleur De Lis Street, Shoreditch
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In the neighbourhood...

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St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
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Geffrye Museum, London (2012)
Credit: Chang Yisheng
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Crondall Street
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Traffic scene at Shoreditch on the Kingsland Road (1929)
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Ely Place dates from the 1860s but the name dates from 1669. On 11 November 1651, property owner Thomas Robinson sold a portion of his land to one Francis Kirkman. It was described as a "parcel of ground 34 feet wide and from 74 to 84 feet long (...) and the entry way from Hoxton Street between the houses, and a garden plot of one acre extending eastwards to Kingsland Highway". In 1665, the Joiners’ Company purchased an estate at Hoxton and in 1669, sold it on to the overseers of the poor of the Liberty of Saffron Hill, Hatton Garden and Ely Rents. This forms the basis for Ely Place and the land to its north (part of which was developed into the Shoreditch Workhouse). Obliterated during Second World War bombing, 1974 saw an area including Lynedoch Street and Ely Place redeveloped.
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Lynedoch Street, Hoxton (1921)
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Looking down Bookham Street from the New North Road. (1956)
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The original Shoreditch Workhouse, situated on the Land of Promise.
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