Spelman House, E1

Block in/near Whitechapel

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(51.51838 -0.06927, 51.518 -0.069) 

Spelman House, E1

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Block · Whitechapel · E1 ·
JANUARY
1
2000
Spelman House is a residential block in Whitechapel.




CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Linda    
Added: 18 Feb 2021 22:03 GMT   

Pereira Street, E1
My grandfather Charles Suett lived in Periera Street & married a widowed neighbour there. They later moved to 33 Bullen House, Collingwood Street where my father was born.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


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GRaleigh   
Added: 23 Feb 2021 09:34 GMT   

Found a bug
Hi all! Thank you for your excellent site. I found an overlay bug on the junction of Glengall Road, NW6 and Hazelmere Road, NW6 on the 1950 map only. It appears when one zooms in at this junction and only on the zoom.

Cheers,
Geoff Raleigh

Source: Glengall Road, NW6

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Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Christine Clark   
Added: 20 Feb 2021 11:27 GMT   

Number 44 (1947 - 1967)
The Clark’s moved here from Dorking my father worked on the Thames as a captain of shell mex tankers,there were three children, CHristine, Barbara and Frank, my mother was Ida and my father Frank.Our house no 44 and 42 were pulled down and we were relocated to Bromley The rest of our family lived close by in Milton Court Rd, Brocklehurat Street, Chubworthy street so one big happy family..lovely days.

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Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

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Born here
Vanessa Whitehouse   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 22:48 GMT   

Born here
My dad 1929 John George Hall

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Added: 16 Feb 2021 13:41 GMT   

Giraud Street
I lived in Giraud St in 1938/1939. I lived with my Mother May Lillian Allen & my brother James Allen (Known as Lenny) My name is Tom Allen and was evacuated to Surrey from Giraud St. I am now 90 years of age.

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Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

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Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Altab Ali Park Altab Ali Park is a small park on Adler Street, White Church Lane and Whitechapel Road.
Boar’s Head Theatre The Boar’s Head Theatre was an inn-yard theatre in the Whitechapel area.
Portsoken Portsoken is one of 25 wards in the City of London, each electing an alderman to the Court of Aldermen and commoners (the City equivalent of a councillor) elected to the Court of Common Council of the City of London Corporation.
St Mary Matfelon St Mary Matfelon church was popularly known as St Mary’s, Whitechapel.
Toynbee Hall Toynbee Hall is a building which is the home of a charity of the same name.
Wentworth Street Turn-of-the-century fashion in east London.
Whitechapel Gallery The Whitechapel Gallery is a public art gallery in Aldgate.

NEARBY STREETS
Adler Street, E1 Adler Street runs between the Whitechapel Road and the Commercial Road.
Angel Alley, E1 Angel Alley was a narrow passage which ran north-south from Wentworth Street to Whitechapel High Street..
Arcadia Court, E1 Arcadia Court is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Artizan Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Arts Quarter, E1 Arts Quarter is a road in the E1 postcode area
Assam Street, E1 Assam Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Bell Lane, E1 Bell Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Black Lion Yard, E1 Black Lion Yard was a narrow thoroughfare running north-south from Old Montague Street (where it was accessible via a set of steps) to Whitechapel Road.
Brick Lane, E1 Brick Lane runs north from the junction of Osborn Street, Old Montague Street and Wentworth Street, through Spitalfields to Bethnal Green Road.
Brody House, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Browns Lane, E1 Browns Lane is marked on the 1862 Stanford map.
Brune House, E1 Residential block
Brune Street, E1 Brune Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Brushfield Street, E1 Brushfield Street is a thoroughfare running east-west from Commercial Street to Bishopsgate.
Buckle Street, E1 Buckle Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Buxton Street, E1 Buxton Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Calvin Street, E1 Calvin Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Carillon Court, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Casson Street, E1 Casson Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Castlemain Street, E1 Castlemain Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Celia Blairman House, E1 Residential block
Central House, E1 Residential block
Chaucer Gardens, E1 Chaucer Gardens is a location in London.
Chicksand Street, E1 Chicksand Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Circle Place, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Cobb Street, E1 Cobb Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Code Street, E1 Code Street is a location in London.
College East, E1 College East is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Commercial Street, E1 Commercial Street is a major thoroughfare running north-south from Shoreditch High Street to Whitechapel High Street.
Coney Way, E1 Coney Way is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Contemporary Art Gallery, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Coppergate House, E1 Residential block
Corbet Place, E1 Corbet Place is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Coverley Close, E1 Coverley Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Crinoline Mews, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Crispin Place, E1 Crispin Place is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Crispin Street, E1 Crispin Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Davenant Street, E1 Davenant Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Deal Street, E1 Deal Street dates from the mid 1840s.
Denning Point, E1 A block within the E1 postcode
Dorset Street, E1 Dorset Street was a small thoroughfare running east-west from Crispin Street to Commercial Street.
Dowson Place, E1 Dowson Place appears on the 1862 Stanford map.
Dray Walk, E1 Dray Walk is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Duval Square, E1 Duval Square is a location in London.
Education Square, E1 Education Square is a location in London.
Elder Street, E1 Elder Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Ely Place, E1 Ely Place appears on the 1862 Stanford map.
Enterprise House, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Fashion Street, E1 Fashion Street is a thoroughfare running east-west from Brick Lane to Commercial Street.
Fieldgate Street, E1 Fieldgate Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Fleur De Lis Street, E1 Fleur De Lis Street runs west from Commercial Street.
Flower & Dean Walk, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Flower and Dean Street, E1 Flower and Dean Street was a narrow street running east-west from Commercial Street to Brick Lane.
Folgate Street, E1 Folgate Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Fordham Street, E1 Fordham Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Fournier Street, E1 Fournier Street is a street running east-west from Brick Lane to Commercial Street alongside Christ Church.
Frostic Walk, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Frying Pan Alley, E1 Frying Pan Alley is situated close to Middlesex Street and its Petticoat Lane market.
Fulbourne Street, E1 Fulbourne Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
George Street, E1 George Street was a street running north-south from Flower and Dean Street to Wentworth Street, crossing Thrawl Street approx. half way along its length..
Goodman Stile, E1 Goodman Stile is a location in London.
Goulston Street, E1 Goulston Street is a thoroughfare running north-south from Wentworth Street to Whitechapel High Street.
Granary Road, E1 Granary Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Gravel Lane, E1 Gravel Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Greatorex Street, E1 Greatorex Street was formerly called High Street.
Green Dragon Yard, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Greenfield Road, E1 Greenfield Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Gun Street, E1 Gun Street was part of the Old Artillery Ground - land formerly designated one of the Liberties of the Tower of London.
Gunthorpe Street, E1 Gunthorpe Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Hanbury Hall, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Hanbury Street, E1 Hanbury Street is a long road running west-east from Commercial Street to Vallance Road.
Heneage Street, E1 Heneage Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Hobsons Place, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Hopetown Street, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Horner Square, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Houndsditch, EC3A A street within the EC3A postcode
Hunton Street, E1 Hunton Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Jerome Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
John Sessions Square, E1 John Sessions Square lies off of Alie Street.
Kent and Essex Yard, E1 Kent and Essex Yard ran north of Whitechapel High Street, close to the west side of Commercial Street.
Kings Arms Court, E1 Kings Arms Court is a road in the E1 postcode area
Lamb Street, E1 Lamb Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Leyden Street, E1 Leyden Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Little Paternoster Row, E1 Little Paternoster Row was once known as French Alley.
Loft House 46a Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Lolesworth Close, E1 Lolesworth Close is a short cul-de-sac on the east side of Commercial Street which was originally the western extremity of Flower and Dean Street.
Lomas Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
London Fruit Exchange, E1 London Fruit Exchange is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Luntley Place, E1 Luntley Place appears on the 1862 Stanford map.
Manningtree Street, E1 Manningtree Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Market Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Middlesex Street, E1 Middlesex Street is home to the Petticoat Lane Market.
Middlesex Street, EC3A Middlesex Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
Monthope Road, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Moss Close, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Mount Terrace, E1 Mount Terrace is a road in the E1 postcode area
Mulberry Street, E1 Mulberry Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Myrdle Street, E1 Myrdle Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Nantes Passage, E1 Nantes Passage (also Church Passage) was built for Huguenot weavers.
Nathaniel Close, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
New Drum Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
New Goulston Street, E1 New Goulston Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
New Road, E1 New Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Old Castle Street, E1 Old Castle Street runs north-south from Wentworth Street to Whitechapel High Street, the southern section of which incorporates the former Castle Alley, murder site of Ripper victim Alice McKenzie.
Old Montague Street, E1 Old Montague Street is a thoroughfare running east-west from Baker’s Row (now Vallance Road) to Brick Lane.
Old Spitalfields Market, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Osborn Place, E1 Osborn Place appears on the 1862 Stanford map.
Osborn Street, E1 Osborn Street is a short road leading from Whitechapel Road to the crossroads with Brick Lane, Wentworth Street and Old Montague Street.
Osborne Street, E1 Osborne Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Osbourne Street, E1 Osbourne Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Parfett Street, E1 Parfett Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Pecks Yard, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Petticoat Square, E1 A street within the postcode
Petticoat Tower, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Plumbers Row, E1 Plumbers Row is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Pomell Way, E1 Pomell Way is a road in the E1 postcode area
Princelet Street, E1 Princelet Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Puma Court, E1 Puma Court is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Quaker Street, E1 Quaker Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Regal Close, E1 Regal Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Resolution Plaza, E1 Resolution Plaza is a location in London.
Riga Mews, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Romford Street, E1 Romford Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Rope Walk Gardens, E1 Rope Walk Gardens is a location in London.
Ropewalk Gardens, EC1M Ropewalk Gardens is a location in London.
Selby Street, E1 Selby Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Settles Street, E1 Settles Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Seven Stars Yard, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Silwex House, E1 Residential block
Spellman Street, E1 Spellman Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Spelman Street, E1 Spelman Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Spital Street, E1 Spital Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Spring Walk, E1 Spring Walk is a road in the E1 postcode area
St Botolph Street, EC3A St Botolph Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
St. Botolph Street, EC3N St. Botolph Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
St. John’s Drive, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Stoney Lane, EC3A Stoney Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Strype Street, E1 John Strype, who became an antiquary, historian and parson was the son of a Huguenot weaver and born here in 1643.
Surma Close, E1 Surma Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Technology Centre, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Tenter Ground, E1 Tenter Ground is one of the notable streets of Spitalfields.
The Community Centre, E1 The Community Centre is a location in London.
Thrawl Street, E1 Originally built by Henry Thrall (or Thrale) c.1656, Thrawl Street ran east-west from Brick Lane as far as George Street across a former tenter field owned by the Fossan brothers, Thomas and Lewis.
Toynbee Street, E1 Toynbee Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Trahorn Close, E1 Trahorn Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Tyne Street, E1 Tyne Street is a location in London.
Umberston Street, E1 Umberston Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Underwood Road, E1 Underwood Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Vallance Road, E1 Vallance Road is a significant road running north-south from Bethnal Green Road to Whitechapel Road.
Vine Court, E1 Vine Court is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Wentworth Street, E1 Wentworth Street runs east-west from the junction of Brick Lane, Osborn Street and Old Montague Street to Middlesex Street, forming part of the boundary between Spitalfields and St Mary’s Whitechapel.
Wheler Street, E1 Wheler Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
White Church Lane, E1 White Church Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
White Church Passage, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
White Kennett Street, EC3A White Kennett Street was named after a Bishop of Peterborough.
Whitechapel High Street, E1 Whitechapel High Street runs approximately west-east from Aldgate High Street to Whitechapel Road and is designated as part of the A11.
Whitechapel Market, E1 Whitechapel Market is a road in the E1 postcode area
Whitechapel Road, E1 Whitechapel Road is a major arterial road in East London.
Whitechapel Technology Centre, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Whites Row, E1 White’s Row is a narrow thoroughfare running east-west from Commercial Street to Crispin Street.
Wilkes Street, E1 Wilkes Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Wodeham Gardens, E1 Wodeham Gardens is a road in the E1 postcode area
Woodseer Street, E1 Woodseer Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.


Whitechapel

Whitechapel is a neighbourhood whose heart is Whitechapel Road itself, named for a small chapel of ease dedicated to St Mary.

By the late 1500s Whitechapel and the surrounding area had started becoming 'other half' of London. Located downwind of the genteel sections of west London which were to see the expansion of Westminster Abbey and construction of Buckingham Palace, it naturally attracted the more fragrant activities of the city, particularly tanneries, breweries, foundries (including the Whitechapel Bell Foundry which later cast Philadelphia's Liberty Bell and also Big Ben), slaughterhouses and, close by to the south, the gigantic Billingsgate fish market, famous in its day for the ornately foul language of the extremely Cockney fishwomen who worked there.

Population shifts from rural areas to London from the 1600s to the mid 1800s resulted in great numbers of more or less destitute people taking up residence amidst the industries and mercantile interests that had attracted them. By the 1840s Whitechapel, along with the enclaves of Wapping, Aldgate, Bethnal Green, Mile End, Limehouse and Stepney (collectively known today as the East End), had evolved, or devolved, into classic 'dickensian' London. Whitechapel Road itself was not particularly squalid through most of this period - it was the warren of small dark streets branching from it that contained the greatest suffering, filth and danger, especially Dorset St., Thrawl St., Berners St. (renamed Henriques St.), Wentworth St. and others.

In the Victorian era the base population of poor English country stock was swelled by immigrants from all over, particularly Irish and Jewish. 1888 saw the depredations of the Whitechapel Murderer, later known as 'Jack the Ripper'. In 1902, American author Jack London, looking to write a counterpart to Jacob Riis's seminal book How the Other Half Lives, donned ragged clothes and boarded in Whitechapel, detailing his experiences in The People of the Abyss. Riis had recently documented the astoundingly bad conditions in the leading city of the United States. Jack London, a socialist, thought it worthwhile to explore conditions in the leading city of the nation that had created modern capitalism. He concluded that English poverty was far rougher than the American variety. The juxtaposition of the poverty, homelessness, exploitive work conditions, prostitution, and infant mortality of Whitechapel and other East End locales with some of the greatest personal wealth the world has ever seen made it a focal point for leftist reformers of all kinds, from George Bernard Shaw, whose Fabian Society met regularly in Whitechapel, to Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, who boarded and led rallies in Whitechapel during his exile from Russia.

Whitechapel remained poor (and colourful) through the first half of the 20th Century, though somewhat less desperately so. It suffered great damage in the V2 German rocket attacks and the Blitz of World War II. Since then, Whitechapel has lost its notoriety, though it is still thoroughly working class. The Bangladeshis are the most visible migrant group there today and it is home to many aspiring artists and shoestring entrepreneurs.

Since the 1970s, Whitechapel and other nearby parts of East London have figured prominently in London's art scene. Probably the most prominent art venue is the Whitechapel Art Gallery, founded in 1901 and long an outpost of high culture in a poor neighbourhood. As the neighbourhood has gentrified, it has gained citywide, and even international, visibility and support.

Whitechapel, is a London Underground and London Overground station, on Whitechapel Road was opened in 1876 by the East London Railway on a line connecting Liverpool Street station in the City of London with destinations south of the River Thames. The station site was expanded in 1884, and again in 1902, to accommodate the services of the Metropolitan District Railway, a predecessor of the London Underground. The London Overground section of the station was closed between 2007 and 27 April 2010 for rebuilding, initially reopening for a preview service on 27 April 2010 with the full service starting on 23 May 2010.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Boar
Credit: Unknown
TUM image id: 1518792376
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Byward Tower, 1893
TUM image id: 1556882285
Licence: CC BY 2.0
46 Aldgate High Street
TUM image id: 1490910153
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Boar
Credit: Unknown
TUM image id: 1518792376
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Third Goodmans Fields Theatre, Great Alie Street, London in 1801 - From
Credit: W. W. Hutchings
TUM image id: 1520855916
Licence: CC BY 2.0
A drawing published in 1907 of the west front of the Church of Holy Trinity, Minories
Credit: Uncredited
TUM image id: 1523993568
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Whitechapel Gallery
Credit: LeHaye/Wiki Commons
TUM image id: 1556738899
Licence: CC BY 2.0
46 Aldgate High Street
TUM image id: 1490910153
Licence: CC BY 2.0
North side of Aldgate High Street, c.1905
TUM image id: 1490909298
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Brick Lane streetsign.
Credit: James Cridland
TUM image id: 1490913219
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Cheshire Street (1969).
Credit: David Granick (1912-80)
TUM image id: 1522751823
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Commercial Street looking south, c.1907. Spitalfields Market is on the right.
TUM image id: 1490908687
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Victoria and Albert Cottages take the form of two ranges of modest two-storey houses built along Deal Street, Spitalfields between 1857 and 1865
Credit: Spitalfields Trust
TUM image id: 1605904747
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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