Westbourne Lodge

Image dated 1857

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(51.518524 -0.187867, 51.518 -0.187) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Photo taken in a westerly direction · * · W2 ·
JUNE
22
2015
Westbourne Lodge appeared in one of the earliest photographs in London.

Westbourne Lodge was built before the Great Western Railway was built but once it had, the railway ran beside the Lodge.

The accompanying photo dates from 6 August 1857 and shows guests at the wedding of the Reverend Frederick Manners Stopford to Florence Augusta Saunders, daughter of Charles Saunders, first general secretary of the Great Western Railway. Isambard Kingdom Brunel was amongst the guests.

During the wedding, both Brunel and Saunders were able to experience trains running beside the wedding party along the railway which they had built.


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:30 GMT   

Kilburn Park - opened 1915
Kilburn Park station was opened at the height of the First World War

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Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:49 GMT   

A bit of a lift....
Kilburn Park was the first station to be designed around escalators, rather than lifts.

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Comment
charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

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Lived here
Brenda Jackson   
Added: 13 Aug 2017 21:39 GMT   

83 Pembroke Road
My Gt Gt grandparents lived at 83 Pembroke Road before it became Granville Road, They were married in 1874, John Tarrant and Maryann Tarrant nee Williamson.

Her brother George Samuel Williamson lived at 95 Pembroke Road with his wife Emily and children in the 1881 Census

Apparently the extended family also lived for many years in Alpha Place, Canterbury Road, Peel Road,

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

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Lived here
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   

Mcgregor Road, W11 (1938 - 1957)
I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood -from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

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Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

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Comment
PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

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Comment
Matthew Moggridge ([email protected])   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

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Comment
norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

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Comment
Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Desborough Lodge Desborough Lodge was a house which was one of five grand houses in the village of Westbourne Green.
Kilburn Aqueduct Some way from the area now called Kilburn, the Kilburn Aqueduct of the Grand Union Canal spanned the River Westbourne.
Queen’s Cinema This cinema was situated at the top of Queensway, on the corner of Bishop's Bridge Road.
Red Lion Bridge Harrow Road once spanned the River Westbourne at this point.
River Westbourne The Westbourne is one of the lost rivers of London.
Royal Oak Royal Oak is a station on the Hammersmith and City Line, between Westbourne Park and Paddington stations, and is the least used station on the Hammersmith and City line.
Spotted Dog The Spotted Dog public house was one of the earliest buildings in Westbourne Green.
Westbourne Farm Westbourne Farm - an old farm with a theatrical connection.
Westbourne Green The story of the building of a suburb.
Westbourne House Two hundred years ago, the biggest house hereabouts...
Westbourne Lodge Westbourne Lodge appeared in one of the earliest photographs in London.

NEARBY STREETS
Admiral Walk, W9 Admiral Walk is a street in Maida Vale.
Alexander Mews, W2 Alexander Mews is a street in Paddington.
Alexander Street, W2 Alexander Street was built in 1853 by Alexander Hall of Watergate House, Sussex.
Alfred Road, W2 Alfred Road is the last survivor of a set of Victorian streets.
Arthur Court, W2 Arthur Court is at the north-west end of Queensway.
Bishop’s Bridge, W2 Bishop’s Bridge is a road in the W2 postcode area
Bishop’s Bridge Road, W2 Bishop’s Bridge Road, now a main thoroughfare, began life as a footpath.
Blomfield Mews, W2 Blomfield Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Blomfield Villas, W2 Blomfield Villas is a road in the W2 postcode area
Bourne Terrace, W2 Bourne Terrace is part of the Warwick Estate in Paddington and has 38 properties.
Brewers Court, W2 Brewers’ Court was finished in 1976.
Bridstow Place, W2 Bridstow Place is a street in Paddington.
Brindley Street, W2 Brindley Street was once one of the poorest streets in Paddington.
Burdett Mews, W2 Burdett Mews is a street in Paddington.
Caernarvon House, W2 The 1955-built Caernarvon House is on the Hallfield Estate.
Celbridge Mews, W2 Celbridge Mews is a street in Paddington.
Chepstow Corner, W2 Chepstow Corner is a street in Paddington.
Chepstow Road, W2 Chepstow Road is a street in Paddington.
Chichester Road, W2 Chichester Road is a road in the W2 postcode area
Chilworth Street, W2 Chilworth Street is an east-west street in W2.
Cirencester Street, W2 Cirencester Street came about in the 1860s but was shortened when the Warwick Estate was built.
Cleveland Gardens, W2 Cleveland Gardens is a short stretch of road behind Cleveland Square.
Cleveland Square, W2 Cleveland Square is a notable square in Paddington.
Cleveland Terrace, W2 Cleveland Terrace is a street in Paddington.
Clifton Villas, W9 Clifton Villas is a street in Maida Vale.
Cloucester Mews West, W2 Cloucester Mews West is a road in the W2 postcode area
Delamere Terrace, W2 Delamere Terrace runs beside the Grand Union Canal towpath.
Desborough Close, W2 Desborough Close was named after Desborough House which was demolished in the 19th century.
Elsie Lane Court, W2 This is a street in the W2 postcode area
Garway Road, W2 Garway Road is a street in Paddington.
Gaydon House, W2 Gaydon House is a 21-storey block containing 125 dwellings.
Gloucester Gardens, W2 Gloucester Gardens is a road in the W2 postcode area
Gloucester Terrace, W2 Gloucester Terrace is an 1850s development.
Hampden Street, W2 Hampden Street is a now demolished street.
Harrow Road, W2 Harrow Road is one of the main arterial roads of London, leading northwest out of the capital.
Hatherley Court, W2 Hatherley Court is a 1930s block.
Hatherley Grove, W2 Hatherley Grove is a street in Paddington.
Hereford Road, W2 Hereford Road was planned as a road of detached villas.
Hunter Lodge, W9 Hunter Lodge is a street in Maida Vale.
Kensington Gardens Square, W2 Kensington Gardens Square is a street in Paddington.
Kildare Terrace, W2 Kildare Terrace is a street in Paddington.
Kingdom Street, W2 Kingdom Street is a road in the W2 postcode area
Lister Lodge, W9 Lister Lodge is a street in Maida Vale.
Lord Hills Road, W2 Lord Hill’s Road was at first called Ranelagh Road.
Monmouth Road, W2 Monmouth Road contained cottages and semi-detached villas by 1846
Newton Mews, W2 Newton Mews is shown on the 1900 map.
Newton Road, W2 William Kinnaird Jenkins laid out Newton Road in 1846.
Oldbury House, W2 Oldbury House is a shopping parade along the Harrow Road with accommodation above, part of the Warwick Estate development.
Orsett Mews, W2 Orsett Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Orsett Terrace, W2 Orsett Terrace combined with Orsett Place to form one street in Paddington.
Pembroke House, W2 Residential block
Pickering Mews, W2 Pickering Mews is a street in Paddington.
Pickering Place, W2 Pickering Place eventually became the northern section of Queensway.
Pickering Terrace, W2 Pickering Terrace was later part of Porchester Road.
Porchester Road, W2 Porchester Road has existed under a series of names since at least the 1750s.
Porchester Square, W2 Begun in 1850 and completed between 1855 and 1858, Porchester Square was one of the last areas of Bayswater to be built.
Porchester Terrace North, W2 Porchester Terrace North is a road in the W2 postcode area
Princethorpe House, W2 Residential block
Ralph Court, W2 Ralph Court backed Peter’s Court in Porchester Road.
Ranelagh Bridge, W2 Ranelagh Bridge is a road in the W2 postcode area
Redan House, W2 Residential block
Rowington Close, W2 Rowington Close probably dates from 1962.
Senior Street, W2 Senior Street has a long history of over 150 years.
Sheldon Square, W2 Sheldon Square is a street in Paddington.
Swanleys, W2 Swanleys was built east of St Stephen’s Church in 1978.
The Colonnades, W2 The Colonnades is in Porchester Square.
The Whiteleys Centre, W2 The Whiteleys Centre is the former site of the Whiteleys department store.
Torquay Street, W2 Torquay Street underwent name changes and building changes.
Warwick Crescent, W2 Warwick Crescent lies along a southern edge of the Little Venice Pool.
Warwick Place, W9 Warwick Place is a street in Maida Vale.
Waverley Road, W2 Waverley Road, now gone, lasted just over a hundred years.
Westbourne Court, W2 Westbourne Court stood at the corner of Orsett Terrace and Westbourne Terrace by 1938.
Westbourne Gardens, W2 Westbourne Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Westbourne Grove Terrace, W2 Runs north from Westbourne Grove.
Westbourne Grove, W2 Westbourne Grove began its existence as a footpath.
Westbourne Park Road, W2 Houses at the Paddington end of Westbourne Park Road date from the 1850s.
Westbourne Park Villas, W2 Westbourne Park Villas is a street in Paddington.
Westbourne Terrace Mews, W2 Westbourne Terrace Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Westbourne Terrace Road, W2 Westbourne Terrace Road is a street in Paddington.
Westbourne Terrace, W2 Westbourne Terrace was an idea of George Gutch the builder.
Westway, W2 At its opening, Westway was the largest continuous concrete structure in Britain.
Woodchester Square, W2 Woodchester Square is a street in Paddington.
Woodchester Street, W2 Woodchester Street disappeared from the map in 1961.

NEARBY PUBS
Great Western The Great Western was a pub in Hampden Street.
Royal Oak The Royal Oak pub gave its name to the nearby station.
Spotted Dog The Spotted Dog public house was one of the earliest buildings in Westbourne Green.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Notting Hill
TUM image id: 1510169244
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Pembridge Road (1900s)
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The Bayswater Conduit in 1798.
TUM image id: 1490459429
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Bayswater Road
TUM image id: 1552860722
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Chilworth Street, W2
TUM image id: 1483806751
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Sutherland Avenue, W9
TUM image id: 1453139016
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Amberley Mews - "The Blue Lamp"
TUM image id: 1545401678
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In the neighbourhood...

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Mrs Siddons’ house at Westbourne Green c. 1800
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The Bayswater Conduit in 1798.
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The Royal Oak pub in Bayswater gave its name to the nearby station
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Bourne Terrace - taken from Torquay Street. On the corner of Bourne Terrace is Saws Ltd at number 264 along with various blocks which no longer exist.
Credit: Bernard Selwwyn
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Cirencester Street, W2 The street’s length was curtailed when the Warwick Estate was built.
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Lord Hills Road at the junction with Senior Street
Credit: Historic England
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Sutherland Avenue, W9
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The picture painted to show the opening of canal in 1801 clearly shows the embankment over the Westbourne valley
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Amberley Mews - "The Blue Lamp"
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Customers of the ’Great Western’ pub, 57 Hampden Street, Paddington (c.1915). Everybody sports a button-hole, suggesting some sort of event.
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