Tower Bridge Court, SE1

An area which may have existed since the nineteenth century or before with housing mainly dating from the 1980s

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(51.5037 -0.07619, 51.503 -0.076) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Block · Bermondsey · SE1 ·
July
31
2021
Tower Bridge Court is a block next to its namesake in Southwark.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

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Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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Comment
Johna216   
Added: 9 Aug 2017 16:26 GMT   

Thanks!
I have recently started a web site, the info you provide on this site has helped me greatly. Thank you for all of your time & work. There can be no real freedom without the freedom to fail. by Erich Fromm. eeggefeceefb

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Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Lived here
Linda    
Added: 18 Feb 2021 22:03 GMT   

Pereira Street, E1
My grandfather Charles Suett lived in Periera Street & married a widowed neighbour there. They later moved to 33 Bullen House, Collingwood Street where my father was born.

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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
roger morris   
Added: 16 Oct 2021 08:50 GMT   

Atherton Road, IG5 (1958 - 1980)
I moved to Atherton road in 1958 until 1980 from Finsbury Park. My father purchased the house from his brother Sydney Morris. My father continued to live there until his death in 1997, my mother having died in 1988.
I attended The Glade Primary School in Atherton Road from sept 1958 until 1964 when I went to Beal School. Have fond memories of the area and friends who lived at no2 (Michael Clark)and no11 (Brian Skelly)

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Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Comment
Simon Chalton   
Added: 10 Oct 2021 21:52 GMT   

Duppas Hill Terrace 1963- 74
I’m 62 yrs old now but between the years 1963 and 1975 I lived at number 23 Duppas Hill Terrace. I had an absolutely idyllic childhood there and it broke my heart when the council ordered us out of our home to build the Ellis Davd flats there.The very large house overlooked the fire station and we used to watch them practice putting out fires in the blue tower which I believe is still there.
I’m asking for your help because I cannot find anything on the internet or anywhere else (pictures, history of the house, who lived there) and I have been searching for many, many years now.
Have you any idea where I might find any specific details or photos of Duppas Hill Terrace, number 23 and down the hill to where the subway was built. To this day it saddens me to know they knocked down this house, my extended family lived at the next house down which I think was number 25 and my best school friend John Childs the next and last house down at number 27.
I miss those years so terribly and to coin a quote it seems they just disappeared like "tears in rain".
Please, if you know of anywhere that might be able to help me in any way possible, would you be kind enough to get back to me. I would be eternally grateful.
With the greatest of hope and thanks,
Simon Harlow-Chalton.


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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Bridge House Built around 1705 and demolished in 1950, Bridge House in George Row was once surrounded by the Jacob’s Island rookery.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbots Lane, SE1 Abbots Lane was named in memory of the medieval Abbots of Lewes.
Archie Street, SE1 Archie Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Artbrand House, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Barnham Street, SE1 Barnham Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Battle Bridge Lane, SE1 Battle Bridge Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bermondsey Street, SE1 Bermondsey Street was named for the Abbey of St Saviour’s.
Bermondsey Wall West, SE16 Bermondsey Wall West is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Bevington Path, SE1 Bevington Path is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Black Eagle Yard, SE1 Black Eagle Yard is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Black Swan Yard, SE1 Black Swan Yard is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Boss Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Brunswick Court, SE1 Brunswick Court is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Burr Close, E1W Burr Close is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Bursar Street, SE1 Bursar Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Butlers & Colonial Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Butlers Colonial Wharf, SE1 Butlers Colonial Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Butlers Wharf Building, SE1 Butlers Wharf Building is a location in London.
Butlers Wharf, SE1 Butlers Wharf is a location in London.
Canvas House, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Cardamom Building, SE1 Cardamom Building is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Carmarthen Place, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Cinnamon Wharf, Cinnamon Wharf lies within the postcode.
Cloysters Green, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Commercial Pier Wharf, SE1 Commercial Pier Wharf is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Copper Row, SE1 Copper Row is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Copperfield House, SE1 Copperfield House, like much of the Dickens Estate, is named after a fictional character.
Counter Street, SE1 Counter Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Crucifix Lane, SE1 Crucifix Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Curlew Street, SE1 Curlew Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Devon Mansions, SE1 Devon Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Dockhead, SE1 Dockhead is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Dombey House, SE16 Dombey House was one of the first blocks built on the Dickens Estate.
Druid Street, SE1 Druid Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Duchess Walk, SE1 Duchess Walk is a location in London.
English Grounds, SE1 English Grounds is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Fair Street, SE1 Fair Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Fenning Street, SE1 Fenning Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Gainsford Street, SE1 Gainsford Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Gainsforoad Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
George Row, SE16 George Row is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Hardwidge Street, SE1 Hardwidge Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Hays Galleria, SE1 Hays Galleria is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Hickman’s Folly, SE1 Hickman’s Folly was a very old Bermondsey street which disappeared as the Dickens Estate was built.
Hobbs Court, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Holyrood Court Business Centre, SE1 Holyrood Court Business Centre is a location in London.
Holyrood Street, SE1 Holyrood Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Horselydown Lane, SE1 Horselydown Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
India House, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Ivory House, E1W Residential block
Jacob Street, SE1 Jacob Street is named after Jacob’s Island, the infamous area which preceded it.
John Felton Road, SE16 John Felton Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Lafone Street, SE1 Lafone Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Lamb Walk, SE1 Lamb Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Leathermarket Court, SE1 Leathermarket Court is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Leathermarket Court, SE1 Leathermarket Court is a road in the SE1P postcode area
Leathermarket Street, SE1P Leathermarket Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Little London Court, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Lloyds Wharf, SE1 Lloyds Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Magdalen Street, SE1 Magdalen Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Maggie Blake’s Cause, SE1 Maggie Blake’s Cause is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Maguire Street, SE1 Maguire Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Maltings Place, SE1 Maltings Place is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Mews Street, E1W Mews Street is a road in the E1W postcode area
Mill Street, SE1 Mill Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Millennium Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
More London Place, SE1 More London Place is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
More London Riverside, SE1 More London Riverside is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Morgans Lane, SE1 Morgan’s Lane runs down to HMS Belfast.
Morocco Street, SE1 Morocco Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
New Concordia Wharf, SE1 New Concordia Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Parkers Row, SE1 Parkers Row is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Paul’s Walk, EC3N A street within the EC3N postcode
Phoenix Wharf Road, SE1 Phoenix Wharf Road is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Pope Street, SE1 Pope Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Potters Fields, SE1 Potters Fields is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Providence Square, SE1 Providence Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Queen Elizabeth Street, SE1 Queen Elizabeth Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Rankin House 139-143, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Raven Wharf, SE1 Raven Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Resource Centre, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Scotts Sufferance Wharfmill Street, SE1 Scotts Sufferance Wharfmill Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Shad Thames, SE1 Shad Thames is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Shand Street, SE1 Shand Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Shipwright Yard, SE1 Shipwright Yard is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Springalls Wharf Apartments, SE16 Springalls Wharf Apartments is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
St Katharine’s Way, E1W St Katharine’s Way is a road in the E1W postcode area
St. Thomas Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Sugar Lane, SE16 Sugar Lane is a location in London.
Swan Court, SE1 Swan Court is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Tanner Street, SE1 Tanner Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Tapley House, SE1 Tapley House was one of the first buildings of the Dickens Estate.
The Circle, SE1 The Circle is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
The Leathermarket, SE1P The Leathermarket is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
The Queens Walk, SE1 The Queens Walk is a location in London.
The Tanneries, SE1 The Tanneries is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Three Oak Lane, SE1 Three Oak Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Tooley Street, SE1 Tooley Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Tooley Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Tower Bridge Piazza, SE1 Tower Bridge Piazza is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Tower Bridge, SE1 Tower Bridge is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Tyers Estate, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Unity Wharf, SE1 Unity Wharf is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Vine Lane, SE1 Vine Lane is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Vintage Yard, SE1 Vintage Yard is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Vogans Mill Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Vogans Mill, SE1 Vogans Mill is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Weavers Lane, SE1 Weavers Lane is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Whites Grounds Estate, SE1 Whites Grounds Estate is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Whites Grounds, SE1 Whites Grounds is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Wolseley Street, SE1 Wolseley Street was formerly called London Street.

NEARBY PUBS
All Bar One Butler’s Wharf This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Anchor tap This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Cecil’s This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Dean swift This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Draft house This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Kings arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Pommeler’s rest This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Shipwrights arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Suchard free house This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The hide This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The horniman at hays This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The woolpack This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Bermondsey

The name Bermondsey first appears in a letter from Pope Constantine (708-715), in which he grants privileges to a monastery at ’Vermundesei’, then in the hands of the abbot of Medeshamstede, as Peterborough was known at the time.

Though Bermondsey’s name may derive from Beornmund’s island (whoever the Anglo-Saxon Beornmund was, is another matter), but Bermondsey is likely to have been a higher, drier spot in an otherwise marshy area, rather than a real island.

The area first appears in a letter from Pope Constantine (708-715), in which he grants privileges to a monastery at Vermundesei, then in the hands of the abbot of Medeshamstede, as Peterborough was known at the time.

Bermondsey appears in Domesday Book. It was then held by King William, though a small part was in the hands of Robert, Count of Mortain, the king’s half brother, and younger brother of Odo of Bayeux, then Earl of Kent.

Bermondsey Abbey was founded as a Cluniac priory in 1082, and was dedicated to St Saviour. Monks from the abbey began the development of the area, cultivating the land and embanking the riverside. They turned an adjacent tidal inlet at the mouth of the River Neckinger into a dock, named St Saviour’s Dock after their abbey. The Knights Templar also owned land here and gave their names to one of the most distinctive streets in London, Shad Thames (a corruption of ’St John at Thames’). Other ecclesiastical properties stood nearby at Tooley (a corruption of ’St Olave’s’) Street, located in the Archbishop of Canterbury’s manor of Southwark, where wealthy citizens and clerics had their houses, including the priors of Lewes and St Augustine’s, Canterbury, and the abbot of Battle.

As it developed over the centuries, Bermondsey underwent many changes. After the Great Fire of London, it was settled by the well-to-do and took on the character of a garden suburb especially along the lines of Grange Road, as Bermondsey Street became more urbanised. A pleasure garden was founded there in the 17th century, commemorated by the Cherry Garden Pier. Samuel Pepys visited ’Jamaica House’ at Cherry Gardens in 1664 and recorded in his diary that he had left it "singing finely".

Though not many buildings survive from this era, one notable exception is the church of St Mary Magdalen in Bermondsey Street, completed in 1690 (although a church has been recorded on this site from the 13th Century). This church came through both 19th-century redevelopment and The Blitz unscathed. It is not just an unusual survivor for Bermondsey; buildings of this era are relative rarities in Inner London in general.

In the 18th century, the discovery of a spring from the river Neckinger in the area led to Bermondsey becoming a spa leisure resort, as the area between Grange and Jamaica Roads called Spa Road commemorates.

It was from the Bermondsey riverside that the painter J.M.W. Turner executed his famous painting of The Fighting Temeraire Tugged to her Last Berth to be Broken Up (1839), depicting the veteran warship being towed to Rotherhithe to be scrapped.

By the mid-19th century parts of Bermondsey, especially along the riverside had become a notorious slum — with the arrival of industrial plants, docks and immigrant housing. The area around St Saviour’s Dock, known as Jacob’s Island, was one of the worst in London. It was immortalised by Charles Dickens’s novel Oliver Twist, in which the principal villain Bill Sikes meets a nasty end in the mud of ’Folly Ditch’ an area which was known as Hickmans Folly — the scene of an attack by Spring Heeled Jack in 1845 — surrounding Jacob’s Island. Dickens provides a vivid description of what it was like:

<CITE>... crazy wooden galleries common to the backs of half a dozen houses, with holes from which to look upon the slime beneath; windows, broken and patched, with poles thrust out, on which to dry the linen that is never there; rooms so small, so filthy, so confined, that the air would seem to be too tainted even for the dirt and squalor which they shelter; wooden chambers thrusting themselves out above the mud and threatening to fall into it — as some have done; dirt-besmeared walls and decaying foundations, every repulsive lineament of poverty, every loathsome indication of filth, rot, and garbage: all these ornament the banks of Jacob’s Island.</CITE>

Bermondsey Town Hall was built on Spa Road in 1881. The area was extensively redeveloped during the 19th century and early 20th century with the expansion of the river trade and the arrival of the railways. London’s first passenger railway terminus was built by the London to Greenwich Railway in 1836 at London Bridge. The first section to be used was between the Spa Road Station and Deptford High Street. This local station had closed by 1915.

The industrial boom of the 19th century was an extension of Bermondsey’s manufacturing role in earlier eras. As in the East End, industries that were deemed too noisome to be carried on within the narrow confines of the City of London had been located here — one such that came to dominate central Bermondsey, away from the riverfront, was the processing and trading of leather and hides. Many buildings from this era survive around Leathermarket Street including the huge Leather, Hide and Wool Exchange (now residential and small work spaces). Hepburn and Gale’s tannery (disused as of early 2007) on Long Lane is also a substantial survivor of the leather trade.

Peek, Frean and Co was established in 1857 at Dockhead, Bermondsey by James Peek and George Hender Frean. They moved to a larger plant in Clements Road in 1866, leading to the nickname ’Biscuit Town’ for Bermondsey, where they continued baking until the brand was discontinued in 1989. Wee Willie Harris (usually credited as the first British rock and roll player) came from Bermondsey. He was known as Britain’s Wild man of Rock N’ Roll). He also worked in Peak Freans.

To the east of Tower Bridge, Bermondsey’s 3½ miles of riverside were lined with warehouses and wharves, of which the best known is Butler’s Wharf. They suffered severe damage in World War II bombing and became redundant in the 1960s following the collapse of the river trade. After standing derelict for some years, many of the wharves were redeveloped under the aegis of the London Docklands Development Corporation during the 1980s. They have now been converted into a mixture of residential and commercial accommodations and have become some of the most upmarket and expensive properties in London. In 1997, US President Bill Clinton and Prime Minister Tony Blair visited the area to dine at the Pont de la Tour restaurant at Butler’s Wharf.

Millwall F.C. moved to a new stadium on Coldblow Lane in 1910, having previously played in Millwall, but have kept their original name despite playing at the opposite side of the River Thames to the Millwall area. They played at The Den until 1993, when they relocated to the New Den nearby. A public sports centre is also included in their stadium.

Reorganisation of lines and closure of stations left Bermondsey’s transport links with the rest of London poorer in the late twentieth century. This was remedied in 2000 with the opening of Bermondsey tube station on the Jubilee Line Extension.

Bermondsey tube station was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects and was originally intended to have a multi-storey office building sitting on top.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Byward Tower, 1893
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Licence: CC BY 2.0
Leman Street (1930s)
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Mansell Street, E1 (1902)
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Mitre Street, EC3
TUM image id: 1530117928
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In the neighbourhood...

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Mark Lane station
Credit: London Transport
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Byward Tower, 1893
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Wolseley Buildings, Wolseley Street, Bermondsey (1926) Tenements such as these were a common feature of inner south London in the late 19th and early 20th century. Typically they had been built by private landlords, some with a philanthropic inclination.
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Bakers Hall Court in the City of London is named after the nearby hall of the Worshipful Company of Bakers. The Bakers’ Company had an interesting start being split between makers of white bread and makers of brown bread.
Credit: Stock photo
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Hickman’s Folly. Bermondsey (1930s) Hickman’s Folly was a cul de sac which ran parallel and south of Wolseley Street and said to have been built on the site of a tannery. At one time it ran from Dockhead to George Row where it crossed the open Neckinger by a bridge.
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