St Charles Hospital

Hospital in/near North Kensington, existing between 1881 and now

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(51.5224 -0.21681, 51.522 -0.216) 

St Charles Hospital

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Hospital · * · W10 ·
MARCH
28
2017
The St Marylebone workhouse infirmary was opened in 1881 on Rackham Street, North Kensington and received a congratulatory letter from Florence Nightingale.

In 1876 potential sites for an infirmary for the sick poor of the parish of St Marylebone were being considered in the West End, Hampstead and Ladbroke Grove in North Kensington. The last site was finally chosen - a 3.5 acre site in Rackham Street costing almost £8100 - and the foundation stone was laid in 1879.

In 1881 the St Marylebone Union Infirmary was officially opened by the Prince and Princess of Wales. The building was three storeys high, with a central block and four pavilions. It had accommodation for 744 patients (372 males in the two pavilions to the west of the central block and 372 females to the east) and 86 resident staff (the Infirmary also had 82 non-resident staff).

The staff included a resident Medical Officer, whose annual salary should have been £500, but the Guardians managed to beat this down to £450, an Assistant Medical Officer, who earned £150 a year, a dispenser (£120 a year) and a Matron, who earned between £100-150. The Assistant Matron received £50-70 a year, while a pavilion nurse earned £28-32. A day or night nurse received £20-25 a year, while the Head Night Nurse received £32-38. Accommodation, rations, uniforms and laundry were included.

In 1884 more land was bought and a Nurses' Home built, which was opened by Princess Christian, daughter of Queen Victoria. Florence Nightingale established a Training School for Nurses at the Infirmary, one of the first in a poor law establishment.

In 1902 an X-ray apparatus was installed and an operating theatre opened.

In 1923 the Infirmary was renamed the St Marylebone Hospital. By this time it had 732 beds; the patients were mainly chronically infirm adults and children. The following year an extension adjacent to the west end of the original Nurses' Home was opened by the then Minister of Health, Neville Chamberlain (the extension became known as the Chamberlain Home). In 1926 some wards had bedside wireless sets installed. In 1928 an internal phone system was installed.

In 1930 the LCC took over administrative charge and renamed it St Charles Hospital. New buldings were erected in the open spaces between the pavilions during the 1930s and, in 1936, another new Nurses' Home opened. In 1937 new accommodation was built for the night nurses at the northwest corner of the site, which had previously been occupied by the doctors' garden (the Chamberlain Home had proved to be inadequate and noisy). In 1938 an epidemic of infective enteritis in babies caused several to be admitted. Some died and this affected the reputation of the Hospital for a while.

In 1939 the Hospital became a District General Hospital, but facilities were inadequate and few operations were performed. For the duration of WW2 all the top floor wards were closed. A bomb demolished the southern boundary wall and several windows were blown out. A few incendiary bombs fell in the open spaces, but the Hospital survived relatively unscathed.

In 1948 St Charles Hospital joined the NHS under the control of the Paddington Group Hospital Management Committee. The number of beds decreased as wards were taken over for other uses. By 1949 there were 400 beds, 260 of which were medical, including 60 for TB patients, 12 for venereal disease and 45 for children.

During the 1950s the Hospital acquired several Portakabins and an Out-Patients Department opened. In 1952 an 8-bedded plastic surgery unit was opened by Sir Harold Gillies (1882-1960).

In 1960 a bleeper system was installed for the medical staff. New pathology laboratories opened in 1964 and, in 1966, the wards were modernized. The Peter Pan Ward, with 36 beds, was opened as a facility for mothers to stay with their children. In 1967 a modern, fully air-conditioned twin operating theatre with anaesthetic and recovery rooms was built. The following year a new plastic surgery ward was opened by Lady Gillies.

The Out-Patients Department was extended in 1972 and, in 1973, a Paediatric Department was opened by Sir Keith Joseph (1918-1994), Secretary of State for Health and Social Services.

By 1981 the Hospital had 350 beds with 600 staff (one-third of which were resident), reversing the earlier situation when there had been more beds than staff. 104 beds were for general medical cases, 81 surgical, 36 orthopaedic, 36 paediatric and 63 for the elderly. The wards were upgraded and the following year plans were made for a new psychiatric and psychogeriatric unit to be established between the main Hospital and St Marks Road, giving an extra 116 beds and 120 places in a Day Hospital.

In-patient services gradually reduced though and, by 1998, the Hospital had 120 beds. The site became underused and its future uncertain. In 2007 NHS Direct closed its call centre based at the Hospital.

The Hospital is currently managed by Kensington and Chelsea Primary Case Trust (PCT), although historically most in-patients had been from Westminster. The PCT runs a Minor Injuries Unit, a palliative care centre and a pharmacy; there are 61 beds for patients requiring rehabilitation. About one-third of the site is occupied by a Mental Health Centre operated by the Central and North West London Mental Health Trust (CNWL).


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St Charles Hospital

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
22 Maxilla Gardens 22 Maxilla Gardens is a now-demolished property.
24 Maxilla Gardens 24 Maxilla Gardens was an address along Maxilla Gardens.
29 Rackham Street, W10 29 Rackham Street lay about halfway along on the north side of the street.
3 Acklam Road From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.
6 East Row, W10 6 East Row was a house along East Row which was demolished in 1960 as part of slum clearance in the area.
Adair Road before redevelopment A photo showing Adair Road’s junction with Golborne Gardens in March 1964.
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed) The Admiral Blake was situated at the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Barlby Road.
Barlby Primary School Barlby Road Primary School has long served the children of North Kensington.
Clayton Arms A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town.
Corner of Caird Street and Lancefield Street (1910) The corner of Caird Street with Lancefield Street.
Corner of Rackham Street, Ladbroke Grove (1950) The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance is the traditional starting point for the Notting Hill Carnival.
Exmoor Street (1950) Photographed just after the Second World War, looking north along Exmoor Street.
Gas Light and Coke Company The gasometers of the Gas Light and Coke company dominated North Kensington until demolition in the late 20th century.
Harrow Road (1920s) Harrow Road in the 1920s, looking south east towards the Prince of Wales pub and the Emmanuel Church spire.
Hudson’s the chemist (1906) Hudson's, a chemist shop, stood on the corner of Ilbert Street and Third Avenue in the Queen's Park estate.
Jack of Newbury The Jack of Newbury stood at the corner of East Row and Kensal Road until it was bombed on 2 October 1940.
Kensal Green Kensal Green, site of England’s oldest cemetery still in use.
Kensal House There are two Kensal Houses in London W10 - this was the original
Kensington Hippodrome The Kensington Hippodrome was a racecourse built in Notting Hill, London, in 1837, by entrepreneur John Whyte.
Kensington Park Hotel The KPH is a landmark pub on Ladbroke Grove.
Ladbroke Grove Ladbroke Grove is named after James Weller Ladbroke, who developed the Ladbroke Estate in the mid nineteenth century, until then a largely rural area on the western edges of London.
Ladbroke Grove Ladbroke Grove on the corner of St Charles Sqaure taken outside the Eagle public house, looking north, just prior to the outbreak of the Second World War.
Ladbroke Grove looking north (1900) This early 1900s image was taken just south of the junction of Ladbroke Grove and Treverton Street.
Ladbroke Grove railway bridge Looking north over Bartle Bridge in the 1950s
Lads of the Village One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road.
Middle Row School Middle Row School was established in the late 19th century to provide education to the children of Kensal New Town.
North Kensington Library North Kensington Library opened in 1891 and was described as one of London’s finest public libraries.
Notting Hill Barn Farm Notting Barns Farm was one of two farms in the North Kensington area.
Political meeting (1920s) Meeting in front of the Junction Arms situated where Tavistock Road, Crescent and Basing Road met.
Portobello Arms The Portobello Arms was a former pub in Kensal Town, established in 1842.
Portobello Farm Portobello Farm House was approached along Turnpike Lane, sometimes referred to as Green’s Lane, a track leading from Kensington Gravel Pits towards a wooden bridge over the canal.
Portobello Green Portobello Green features a shopping arcade under the Westway along Thorpe Close, an open-air market under the canopy, and community gardens.
Princess Louise Hospital The Princess Louise Hospital for Children was opened by King George V and Queen Mary in 1928. It had 42 beds, an Out-Patients Department and Dispensary for Sick Women.
Queen’s Park Library Queen’s Park Library was built to improve the minds of the new Queen’s Park Estate residents.
Rackham Street, eastern end (1950) The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
Rackham Street, western end (1950) A bombed-out Rackham Street, looking down from the junction with Exmoor Street.
St Charles Hospital The St Marylebone workhouse infirmary was opened in 1881 on Rackham Street, North Kensington and received a congratulatory letter from Florence Nightingale.
St Charles Square after bombing (1950) A corner of St Charles Square looking north, just after the Second World War
St Charles Square ready for redevelopment (1951) Photographed in 1951, the corner of St Charles Square and Ladbroke Grove looking northwest just after the Second World War.
St Charles’ Square Training College (1908) St Charles’ Square Training College/Carmelite Convent.
St Martins Mission Saint Martin's Mission was originally known as Rackham Hall as it was situated on Rackham Street.
St Quintin Park & Wormwood Scrubbs St Quintin Park & Wormwood Scrubbs - two spellings missing from the modern map.
St Quintin Park Cricket Ground (1890s) Before the turn of the 20th century, west of present day North Kensington lay fields - the future Barlby Road was the site of the St Quintin Park Cricket Ground.
St. Joseph’s Home St Joseph's dominated a part of Portobello Road up until the 1980s.
The Eagle The Eagle, on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Telford Road.
The Flora The Flora is situated on Harrow Road, W10.
The Foresters The Foresters - a lost pub of London W10
The Mitre The Mitre was situated at 62 Golborne Road.
The Plough From the sixteenth century onwards, the Plough stood beside the Harrow Road.
The Victoria (Narrow Boat) The Victoria later became the Narrow Boat before it burned down.
Wedlake Street Baths In a time when most had somewhere to live but few had somewhere to wash at home, public baths were the place to go...
Western Arms The Western Arms was a pub situated on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Kensal Road.
Western Iron Works The Western Iron Works was the foundry business of James Bartle and Co.
William Miller’s Yard William Miller's Yard stood in Chapel Place, West Row.

NEARBY STREETS
Absalom Road, W10 Absalom Road was the former name for the western section of Golborne Gardens.
Acklam Road, W10 Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway.
Adair Road, W10 Adair Road is a street on the Kensal Town/North Kensington borders.
Adair Tower, W10 Adair Tower is a post-war tower block on the corner of Adair Road and Appleford Road, W10.
Adela Street, W10 Adela Street is a small cul-de-sac in Kensal Town.
Admiral Mews, W10 Admiral Mews is a small road off Barlby Road, W10.
Alba Place, W11 Alba Place is part of the Colville Conservation Area.
Aldermaston Street, W10 Aldermaston Street is a lost street of North Kensington
Alderson Street, W10 Alderson Street is a side street north of Kensal Road.
Alma Place, NW10 Alma Place lies between Kensal Green Cemetery and the railway.
Alperton Street, W10 Alperton Street is the first alphabetically named street in the Queen’s Park Estate, W10.
Appleford House, W10 Appleford House is a residential block along Appleford Road.
Appleford Road, W10 Appleford Road was transformed post-war from a Victorian street to one dominated by housing blocks.
Archway Close, W10 Archway Close is a cul-de-sac off of St Mark’s Road, W10.
Athlone Place, W10 Athlone Place runs between Faraday Road and Bonchurch Road.
Balliol Road, W10 Balliol Road leads from Kelfield Gardens to Oxford Gardens.
Barfett Street, W10 Barfett Street is a street on the Queen’s Park Estate, W10
Barlby Gardens, W10 Barlby Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Barlby Road, W10 Barlby Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Bartle Road, W11 Bartle Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Basing Street, W11 Basing Street was originally Basing Road between 1867 and 1939.
Bassett Road, W10 Bassett Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Bayford Road, NW10 Bayford Road is a street in Willesden.
Berens Road, NW10 Berens Road is a location in London.
Bevington Road, W10 Bevington Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Blagrove Road, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode.
Blake Close, W10 Blake Close is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Blenheim Crescent, W11 Blenheim Crescent one of the major thoroughfares in Notting Hill - indeed it features in the eponymous film.
Bonchurch Road, W10 Bonchurch Road was first laid out in the 1870s.
Bosworth Road, W10 Bosworth Road was the first street built as Kensal New Town started to expand to the east.
Bracewell Road, W10 Bracewell Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Bramley Street, W10 Bramley Street is one of the lost streets of North Kensington.
Bransford Street, W10 Bransford Street became Porlock Street before vanishing altogether.
Branstone Street, W10 Branstone Street, originally Bramston Street, disappeared in 1960s developments.
Brewster Gardens, W10 Brewster Gardens is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Briar Walk, W10 Briar Walk lies on the Queen's Park Estate
Bridge Close, W10 Bridge Close is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Bruce Close, W10 Bruce Close replaced the earlier Rackham Street in this part of W10.
Bruckner Street, W10 Bruckner Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Buller Road, W10 Buller Road is a small residential road on the west side of Kilburn Lane.
Caird Street, W10 Caird Street is the ’C’ street on the Queen’s Park Estate
Calderon Place, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Calverley Street, W10 Calverley Street, one of the lost streets of W10 is now underneath a motorway slip road.
Cambridge Gardens, W10 Cambridge Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Camelford Walk, W11 Camelford Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
Canal Close, W10 Canal Close is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Canal Way, W10 Canal Way was built on the site of the Kensal Gas Works.
Charlotte Mews, W10 Charlotte Mews is one of London W10's newer thoroughfares.
Chesterton Road, W10 Chesterton Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Clarendon Walk, W11 Clarendon Walk is a walkway in a recent Notting Dale development.
Codrington Mews, W11 This attractive L-shaped mews lies off Blenheim Crescent between Kensington Park Road and Ladbroke Grove.
Compton Road, NW10 Compton Road is a street in Willesden.
Conlan Street, W10 Conlan Street is one of the newer roads of Kensal Town.
Convent Gardens, W11 Convent Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Cornwall Crescent, W11 Cornwall Crescent belongs to the third and final period of building on the Ladbroke estate.
Cornwall Road, W11 Cornwall Road was once the name for the westernmost part of Westbourne Park Road.
Crowthorne Road, W10 Crowthorne Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Dale Row, W11 Dale Row is a street in Notting Hill.
Dalgarno Gardens, W10 Dalgarno Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Dalgarno Way, W10 Dalgarno Way is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Darfield Way, W10 Darfield Way, in the Latimer Road area, was built over a number of older streets as the Westway was built.
Darfield Way, W10 Darfield Way is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Droop Street, W10 Droop Street is one of the main east-west streets of the Queen’s Park Estate.
Dunworth Mews, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
East Mews, W10 East Mews was lost when the Westway was built. It lies partially under the modern Darfield Way.
East Row, W10 East Row is a road with a long history within Kensal Town.
Edenham Mews, W10 Edenham Mews was the site of a youth club and day nursery after the Second World War until demolition.
Edenham Street, W10 Edenham Street was swept away in 1969.
Elgin Mews, W11 Elgin Mews lies in Notting Hill.
Elkstone Road, W10 Elkstone Road replaced Southam Street around 1970.
Enbrook Street, W10 Enbrook Street is another street north of Harrow Road, W10 without a pub.
Exmoor Street, W10 Exmoor Street runs from Barlby Road to St Charles Square, W10
Eynham Road, W12 Eynham Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Faraday Road, W10 Faraday Road is one of the ’scientist’ roadnames of North Kensington.
Farrant Street, W10 Farrant Street is the missing link in the alphabetti spaghetti of the streetnames of the Queen’s Park Estate
Fifth Avenue, W10 Fifth Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Finstock Road, W10 Finstock Road is a turning out of Oxford Gardens.
First Avenue, W10 First Avenue is street number one in the Queen's Park Estate
Folly Mews, W11 Folly Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Fourth Avenue, W10 Shalfleet Drive is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Galton Street, W10 Galton Street lies within the Queen’s Park Estate, W10.
Glenroy Street, W12 Glenroy Street is a road in the W12 postcode area
Golborne Gardens, W10 Golborne Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Golborne Mews, W10 Golborne Mews lies off of the Portobello Road, W10.
Golborne Road, W10 Golborne Road, heart of North Kensington, was named after Dean Golbourne, at one time vicar of St. John’s Church in Paddington.
Golden Mews, W11 Golden Mews was a tiny mews off of Basing Street, W11.
Halstow Road, NW10 Halstow Road was laid out in the 1890s.
Harrow Road, NW10 Harrow Road is a location in London.
Harrow Road, W10 Harrow Road is a main road through London W10.
Hawthorn Walk, W10 Queen's Park Estate
Hayden’s Place, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Hayden’s Place, W11 Haydens Place is a small cul-de-sac off of the Portobello Road.
Hayden’s Place, W11 Hayden’s Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Hazlewood Crescent, W10 Hazlewood Crescent, much altered by 1970s redevelopment, is an original road of the area.
Hazlewood Tower, W10 Hazlewood Tower is a skyscraper in North Kensington, London W10.
Heather Walk, W10 Heather Walk lies in the Queen’s Park Estate
Hewer Street, W10 Built as part of the St Charles’ estate in the 1870s, it originally between Exmoor Street to a former street called Raymede Street.
Highlever Road, W10 Highlever Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Hill Farm Road, W10 Hill Farm Road is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Humber Drive, W10 Humber Drive is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Huxley Street, W10 Huxley Street is the only street beginning with an H on the Queen’s Park Estate.
Ilbert Street, W10 Ilbert Street is the ’I’ street on the Queen’s Park Estate, W10
Ivebury Court, W10 Ivebury Court is a street in North Kensington, London W10
James Collins Close, W9 James Collins Close is a street in Maida Vale.
James House, W10 James House is a residential block in Appleford Road.
John Fearon Walk, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Kelfield Gardens, W10 Kelfield Gardens is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Kelfield Mews, W10 Kelfield Mews is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Kensal House, W10 Kensal House (1936), was designed to show off the power of gas and originally had no electricity at all.
Kensal Place, W10 Kensal Place ran from Southam Street to Kensal Road.
Kensal Road, W10 Kensal Road, originally called Albert Road, is the heart of Kensal Town.
Kensington Park Mews, W11 Kensington Park Mews lies off of Kensington Park Road, W11
Kilravock Street, W10 Kilravock Street is a street on the Queen’s Park Estate, London W10
Kingsbridge Road, W10 Kingsbridge Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Kingsdown Close, W10 Kingsdown Close is one of a select number of roads in London W10 lying south of Westway.
Ladbroke Crescent, W11 Ladbroke Crescent belongs to the third and final great period of building on the Ladbroke estate and the houses were constructed in the 1860s.
Ladbroke Grove, W10 Ladbroke Grove runs from Notting Hill in the south to Kensal Green in the north, and straddles the W10 and W11 postal districts.
Lancaster Road, W11 Lancaster Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Lancefield Street, W10 Lancefield Street runs from Caird Street to Bruckner Street.
Latimer Place, W10 Latimer Place is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Lavie Mews, W10 Lavie Mews, W10 was a mews connecting Portobello Road and Murchison Road.
Lionel Mews, W10 Lionel Mews was built around 1882 and probably disappeared in the 1970s.
Lothrop Street, W10 Lothrop Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Malton Mews, W10 Malton Mews, formerly Oxford Mews, runs south off of Cambridge Gardens.
Malton Road, W11 Malton Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Manchester Drive, W10 Manchester Drive is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Manchester Road, W10 Manchester Road is one of the lost streets of North Kensington, now buried beneath a roundabout.
Maple Walk, W10 Post war development on the Queen’s Park Estate created some plant-based street names.
Marne Street, W10 Marne Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Matthew Close, W10 Matthew Close is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Maxilla Gardens, W10 Maxilla Gardens was a former street in London W10.
Maxilla Walk, W10 Maxilla Walk is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Methwold Road, W10 Methwold Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Middle Row, W10 Middle Row is one of the original streets laid out as Kensal New Town.
Millwood Street, W10 Millwood Street is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Morgan Road, W10 Morgan Road connects Wornington Road and St Ervans Road.
Mozart Street, W10 Mozart Street was part of the second wave of development of the Queen’s Park Estate.
Munro Mews, W10 Munro Mews is a part cobbled through road that connects Wornington Road and Wheatstone Road.
Murchison Road, W10 Murchison Road existed for just under 100 years.
Nascot Street, W12 Nascot Street is a road in the W12 postcode area
Norburn Street, W10 Norburn Street is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
North Pole Road, W10 North Pole Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
North Pole Road, W12 North Pole Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Nursery Lane, W10 Nursery Lane is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Oakworth Road, W10 Oakworth Road dates from the 1920s when a cottage estate was built by the council.
Octavia House, W10 Octavia House on Southern Row was built in the late 1930s.
Orchard Close, W10 Orchard Close is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Oxford Gardens, W10 Oxford Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Pamber Street, W10 Pamber Street is a lost street of North Kensington.
Pangbourne Avenue, W10 Pangbourne Avenue is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Parry Road, W10 Parry Road is on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Peach Road, W10 Paach Road is one of the newer streets of the Queen’s Park Estate in London W10
Pember Road, NW10 Pember Road is one of the side streets to the west of Kilburn Lane, NW10
Portobello Road, W10 Portobello Road is split into two sections by the Westway/Hammersmith and City line.
Portobello Road, W11 Portobello Road is internationally famous for its market.
Rackham Street, W10 Rackham Street is a road that disappeared from the streetscape of London W10 in 1951.
Raddington Road, W10 Raddington Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Rainham Road, NW10 Rainham Road, in Kensal Green, was laid out in 1895.
Raymede Street, W10 Raymede Street, after severe bomb damage in the area, disappeared after 1950.
Regent Street, NW10 Regent Street, otherwise an obscure side street is one of the oldest roads in Kensal Green.
Rendle Street, W10 Rendle Street ran from Murchison Road to Telford Road.
Rillington Place, W11 Rillington Place is a small street with an infamous history.
Ronan Walk, W10 Ronan Walk was one of the streets constructed in a 1970s build parallel to the Harrow Road.
Rootes Drive, W10 Rootes Drive is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Ruston Mews, W11 Ruston Mews, W11 was originally Crayford Mews.
Salters Road, W10 Salters Road lies on the site of an old playground.
Scampston Mews, W10 Scampston Mews is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Scrubs Lane, W12 Scrubs Lane is a road in the W12 postcode area
Second Avenue, W10 Second Avenue is one of the streets of the Queen's Park Estate, W10
Shinfield Street, W12 Shinfield Street is a road in the W12 postcode area
Shrewsbury Street, W10 Shrewsbury Street is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Silchester Mews, W10 Silchester Mews, shaped like an H, disappeared in 1969 under the Westway.
Silchester Road, W10 Silchester Road crosses the border between London W10 and London W11.
Silchester Street, W10 Silchester Street is a lost street of North Kensington.
Silchester Terrace, W10 Silchester Terrace was lost to W10 in the 1960s.
Silvester Mews, W11 Silvester Mews was a mews off of Basing Street, W11.
Sixth Avenue, W10 Sixth Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Snarsgate Street, W10 Snarsgate Street is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Southam House, W10 Southam House is situated on Adair Road.
Southam Street, W10 Southam Street was made world-famous in the photographs of Roger Mayne.
Southern Row, W10 Southern Row was originally South Row to match the other streets in the neighbourhood.
St Andrews Square, W11 St Andrews Square is a street in Notting Dale, formed when the Rillington Place area was demolished.
St Charles Place, W10 St Charles Place is a street in North Kensington, London W10
St Charles Square, W10 St Charles Square is a street in North Kensington, London W10
St Columbs House, W10 St Columbs House is situated at 9-39 Blagrove Road.
St Ervans Road, W10 St Ervans Road is named after the home town of the Rev. Samuel Walker.
St Helens Gardens, W10 St Helens Gardens seems to date from the 1860s.
St Johns Terrace, W10 St Johns Terrace is a street in North Kensington, London W10
St Joseph’s Close, W10 St Joseph’s Close is a cul-de-sac off of Bevington Road.
St Lawrence Terrace, W10 St Lawrence Terrace is a street in North Kensington, London W10
St Marks Road, W10 St Marks Road lies partly in W10 and partly in W11.
St Mark’s Close, W11 St Mark’s Close is a street in Notting Hill.
St Mark’s Place, W11 St Mark’s Place is situated on the site of the former Kensington Hippodrome.
St Mark’s Road, W10 St Mark’s Road extends beyond the Westway into the W10 area.
St Mark’s Road, W11 St. Mark’s Road is a street in the Ladbroke conservation area.
St Michael’s Gardens, W10 St Michael’s Gardens lies to the south of St Michael’s Church.
St Quintin Avenue, W10 St Quintin Avenue connects North Pole Road with the roundabout at the top of St Mark’s Road.
St Quintin Gardens, W10 St Quintin Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Stable Way, W10 Stable Way is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Sunbeam Crescent, W10 Sunbeam Crescent is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Sutton Way, W10 Sutton Way is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Sycamore Walk, W10 Queen's Park Estate
Talbot Mews, W11 Talbot Mews seems to have disappeared just after the Second Worid War.
Tavistock Mews, W11 Tavistock Mews, W11 lies off of the Portobello Road.
Televison Centre, W12 Televison Centre is a location in London.
Telford Road, W10 Telford Road is one of the local streets named after prominent nineteenth century scientists.
The Quadrant, W10 The Quadrant is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Third Avenue, W10 Third Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Thorpe Close, W10 Thorpe Close is a redevelopment of the former Thorpe Mews, laid waste by the building of the Westway.
Tollbridge Close, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Trellick Tower, W10 Trellick Tower is a 31-storey block of flats designed in the Brutalist style by architect Ernő Goldfinger, completed in 1972.
Treverton Street, W10 Treverton Street, a street which survived post war redevelopment.
Trinity Mews, W10 Trinity Mews lies off of Cambridge Gardens.
Wallingford Avenue, W10 Wallingford Avenue is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Walmer Road, W10 Walmer Road is the great lost road of North Kensington, obliterated under Westway.
Warfield Road, NW10 Warfield Road is a street in Willesden.
Waynflete Square, W10 Waynflete Square is one of the newer roads in the vicinity of Latimer Road station.
Webb Close, W10 Webb Close is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Wedlake Street, W10 Wedlake Street arrived as the second wave of building in Kensal Town was completed.
Wellington Road, NW10 Wellington Road commemorates the Duke of Wellington.
Wesley Square, W11 Wesley Square is a street in Notting Hill.
West Row, W10 West Row, W10 began its life in the early 1840s.
Western Dwellings, W10 Western Dwellings were a row of houses, opposite the Western Gas Works, housing some of the workers.
Westview Close, W10 Westview Close is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Westway, W10 Westway is the A40(M) motorway which runs on an elevated section along the W10/W11 border.
Wheatstone Road, W10 Wheatstone Road was the former name of the eastern section of Bonchurch Road.
Wornington Road, W10 Wornington Road connected Golborne Road with Ladbroke Grove, though the Ladbroke end is now closed to through traffic.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Coronation street party, 1953.
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Licence: CC BY 2.0
The "Western"
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Ladbroke Grove (1866)
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Clayton Arms
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The Foresters
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The Lads of the Village pub
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The Prince of Wales
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Admiral Blake (The Cowshed)
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Kensington Park Hotel
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The Albion, now in residential use.
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Saint John the Evangelist
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Coronation street party, 1953.
TUM image id: 1545250697
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The "Western"
TUM image id: 1489498043
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Ladbroke Grove (1866)
TUM image id: 1513618275
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Clayton Arms
TUM image id: 1453029104
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Foresters
TUM image id: 1453071112
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Lads of the Village pub
TUM image id: 1556874496
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Prince of Wales
TUM image id: 1556874951
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed)
TUM image id: 1556888887
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Photographed just after the Second World War, this is the bombed-out Rackham Street, London W10 looking down from the junction with Exmoor Street.
Credit: Kensington and Chelsea library
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Licence: CC BY 2.0
Kensington Park Hotel
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Licence: CC BY 2.0
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