Whitehall, SW1A

Road in/near Westminster, existing until now

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(51.50527 -0.12666, 51.505 -0.126) 
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Road · * · SW1A ·
December
4
2018
Whitehall is recognised as the centre of the government of the United Kingdom.

The name ’Whitehall’ was used for several buildings in the Tudor period - referring to their colour, consisting of light stone. This included the Royal Palace of Whitehall, which gave its name to the street.

The Palace of Whitehall was the residence of Kings Henry VIII through to William III before its destruction by fire in 1698. Whitehall was originally the road that led to the front of the palace. It was widened in the 18th century following the destruction of the palace.

It became a popular place to live by the 17th century. Oliver Cromwell had moved to Wallingford House in the street in 1647. Two years later, Charles I was carried through Whitehall on the way to his trial at Westminster Hall. Whitehall had sufficient space for a scaffold to be erected for the King’s execution in 1649. Cromwell in turn died at the Palace of Whitehall in 1658.

By the 18th century, traffic struggled along the narrow streets south of Holbein Gate. The gate was demolished in 1759. Parliament Street had been a side road alongside the Whitehall Palace, leading to the Palace of Westminster. Parliament Street was widened to match Whitehall’s width.

The Horse Guards building was designed by William Kent, and built during the 1750s.

Scotland Yard, the headquarters of London’s Metropolitan Police Service, was originally located in Great Scotland Yard off the north-eastern end of Whitehall. The headquarters was moved away from Whitehall in 1890.

Downing Street leads off the south-west end of Whitehall, just above Parliament Street.


Main source: Whitehall - Wikipedia
Further citations and sources




CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

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Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   

Hurley Road, SE11
There were stables in the road mid way - also Danny reading had a coal delivery lorry.

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Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   

Saunders Street, SE11
I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT



   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 20:03 GMT   

North Harrow
The North Harrow Embassy Cinema was closed in 1963 and replaced by a bowling alley and a supermarket. As well as the cinema itself there was a substantial restaurant on the first floor.

Source: Embassy Cinema in North Harrow, GB - Cinema Treasures

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Lived here
KJ   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 12:34 GMT   

Family
1900’s Cranmer family lived here at 105 (changed to 185 when road was re-numbered)
James Cranmer wife Louisa ( b.Logan)
They had 3 children one being my grandparent William (Bill) CRANMER married to grandmother “Nancy” He used to go to
Glengall Tavern in Bird in Bush Rd ,now been converted to flats.

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charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

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Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

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Born here
Beverly Sand   
Added: 3 Apr 2021 17:19 GMT   

Havering Street, E1
My mother was born at 48 Havering Street. That house no longer exists. It disappeared from the map by 1950. Family name Schneider, mother Ray and father Joe. Joe’s parents lived just up the road at 311 Cable Street

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Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

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Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Charing Cross Charing Cross denotes the junction of the Strand, Whitehall and Cockspur Street, just south of Trafalgar Square
Embankment Embankment underground station has been known by various names during its long history - including, indeed, ’Embankment’.
Hungerford Bridge Hungerford Bridge is a rail bridge crossing the Thames into Charing Cross station.
Hungerford Stairs The Hungerford Stairs were the entrance point to Hungerford Market from the River Thames. They are now the site of Charing Cross railway Station.
Northumberland House Northumberland House was a large Jacobean townhouse in London, which was the London residence of the Percy family, the Dukes of Northumberland.
Royal Society The Royal Society is a self-governing Fellowship of many of the world’s most distinguished scientists drawn from all areas of science, engineering and medicine.
The Adelphi The Adelphi is a small district surrounding the streets of Adelphi Terrace, Robert Street and John Adam Street.

NEARBY STREETS
Adelaide Street, WC2R Adelaide Street was named for Queen Adelaide, Consort to King William IV.
Adelphi Terrace, WC2N Adelphi Terrace is named after John and Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development in the 1760s.
Baywillow Place, NW11 Baywillow Place is a location in London.
Bollinder Place, EC1V Bollinder Place is location of London.
Buckingham Street, WC2N Buckingham Street is named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, 17th century courtier, who acquired York House which formerly stood on this site; his son sold the area to developers on condition that his father and titles were commemorated on the new streets.
Bundocks Walk, E3 Bundocks Walk is location of London.
Buross Street, E1 Buross Street is a location in London.
Cannon Street, WC2N Cannon Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Canon Row, SW1A Canon Row is at least one thousand year’s old.
Carlton Gardens, SW1Y Carlton Gardens was developed before 1832.
Carlton House Terrace, SW1Y Carlton House Terrace consists of a pair of terraces - white stucco-faced houses on the south side of the street overlooking St. James’s Park.
Charing Cross, SW1A Charing Cross, long regarded as London’s central point, as an address is an enigma.
Charles Ii Street, SW1Y Charles Ii Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Cockspur Street, SW1A Cockspur Street is possibly after the cock fighting that formerly occurred here, cocks often having spurs attached to their feet during fights.
Commissioner’s Yard, SW1A Commissioner’s Yard is a small street behind New Scotland Yard.
Community House, SW1A A street within the postcode
Craven Passage, WC2N Craven Passage is named after William Craven, 3rd Baron Craven, who owned the land when the street was built in the 1730s.
Craven Street, WC2N Craven Street is named after William Craven, 3rd Baron Craven, who owned the land when the street was built in the 1730s.
Derby Gate, SW1A Derby Gate is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Downing Street, SW1A Downing Street has been the home of British Prime Minsters since the eighteenth century.
Duke Street, SW1Y Duke Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Duncannon Street, WC2N Duncannon Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Elmhurstreet Villas, SW1A A street within the SE15 postcode
Embankment Place, WC2N Embankment Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Fludyer Street, SW1A Fludyer Street used to be a street which lay parallel to, and south of, Downing Street.
Fullwood’s Mews, SW1A A street within the 77381 postcode
George Court, WC2N George Court is named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham.
Goddard Way, E14 Goddard Way lies within the E14 postcode.
Golden Jubilee Bridge, WC2N Golden Jubilee Bridge is a road in the WC2N postcode area
Goodwins Court, WC2N Goodwins Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Great Scotland Yard, SW1A Great Scotland Yard is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Haymarket, SW1Y Haymarket – site of a former market selling hay until the 1830s.
Haymarket, SW1Y A street within the SW1Y postcode
Hobhouse Court, WC2H Hobhouse Court is named after Sir John Cam Hobhouse, Victorian MP and arts patron.
Horse Guards Avenue, SW1A Horse Guards Avenue is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Horse Guards Parade, SW1A Horse Guards Parade dates to the time of Henry VIII.
Horse Guards Road, SW1A Horse Guards Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Hungerford House, WC2N Residential block
John Adam Street, WC2N John Adam Street is named after John Adam, who built the Adelphi development with his brother Robert in the 1760s.
King Charles Street, SW1A King Charles Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Kinnaird House, SW1Y Residential block
Lighthouse View, SE10 Lighthouse View is a location in London.
Lower Regent Street, SW1Y Lower Regent Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Millet Place, E16 Millet Place is location of London.
New Zealand House, SW1Y Residential block
Norman Shaw Building North, SW1A Norman Shaw Building North is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Norris Street, SW1Y Norris Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Northumberland Avenue, SW1A Northumberland Avenue runs from Trafalgar Square in the west to the Thames Embankment in the east.
Northumberland Avenue, WC2N The part of Northumberland Avenue nearest to Trafalgar Square lies in the SW1 rather than WC2 postcode.
Northumberland Street, WC2N Northumberland Street commemorates the former Northumberland House, built originally in the early 17th century for the earls of Northampton and later acquired by the earls of Northumberland.
Octagon Mall, Octagon Mall lies within the postcode.
Orange Street, WC2H Orange Street is a road in the SW1Y postcode area
Pall Mall East, SW1A Pall Mall East is an eastern extension of Pall Mall towards Trafalgar Square.
Pall Mall, SW1Y Pall Mall is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Parliament Square, SW1A Parliament Square is one of the most important squares in Westminster, home to the Houses of Parliament and Westminster Abbey.
Parliament Street, SW1A Parliament Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Pelican Estate, SW1A A street within the SE15 postcode
Queens Gardens, SW1A Queens Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Regent Victoria Path, E2 Regent Victoria Path is a location in London.
Richmond House Whitehall, SW1A Richmond House Whitehall is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Richmond Terrace, SW1A Richmond Terrace is a road in the SW1A postcode area
Robert Street, WC2N Robert Street is named after Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development with his brother John in the 1760s.
Rochford Southend East, SW1A Rochford Southend East is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Royal Opera Arcade, SW1Y Royal Opera Arcade is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Shield Street, SE15 Shield Street is a location in London.
Spring Gardens, SW1A Spring Gardens derives its name from the Spring Garden, formed in the 16th century as an addition to the pleasure grounds of Whitehall Palace.
St Albans Street, SW1Y St Albans Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
St Jamess Chambers, SW1Y St Jamess Chambers is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
St Jamess Market, SW1Y St Jamess Market is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
St Martin’s Place, WC2N St Martin’s Place is a short stretch connecting Trafalgar Square to the bottom of Charing Cross Road.
St. James’s Drive, SW1A A street within the 78257 postcode
St. Kilda’s Road, SW1A A street within the N16 postcode
Strand, WC2N Strand is a location in London.
Studio 5, SW1A A street within the E1 postcode
Suffolk Place, SW1Y The Earl of Suffolk (Thomas Howard) was the reason for the naming of Suffolk Place.
Suffolk Street, SW1Y Suffolk Street was named after Thomas Howard, Earl of Suffolk, who owned a stable yard attached to Northumberland House which lay on this site.
The Arches, WC2N The Arches is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
The Gallery, SW1Y The Gallery is a road in the E20 postcode area
The National Gallery, SW1Y The National Gallery is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
The Queen’s Steps, SE1 The Queen’s Steps is a road in the SE1 postcode area
The Queen’s Walk, SE1 The Queen’s Walk is a road in the WC2R postcode area
The Queen’s Walk, SE1 This is a street in the SE1 postcode area
The Queen’s Walk, SE1 The Queen’s Walk is a road in the SE1 postcode area
The Terrace, SW1A The Terrace is a road in the SW1A postcode area
Thomas Hardy Mews, SW16 Thomas Hardy Mews is a location in London.
Thunderer Walk, SW1A A street within the postcode
Trafalgar Square, SW1Y Trafalgar Square commemorates Horatio Nelson’s 1805 victory at the Battle of Trafalgar.
Victoria Embankment Gardens, WC2N Victoria Embankment Gardens is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Victoria Embankment, SW1A Victoria Embankment is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Victoria Embankment, WC2N Victoria Embankment is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Villiers Street, WC2N Villiers Street was named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham
Wallis Walk, E16 Wallis Walk is location of London.
Wards Place, E14 Wards Place is location of London.
Warwick House Street, SW1A Warwick House Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Watergate Walk, WC2N Watergate Walk is named after a former watergate built in 1626 for George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham as an entrance for the former York House.
Waterloo Place, SW1Y Waterloo Place, a broad extension of Regent Street, is awash with statues and monuments that honour heroes and statesmen of the British Empire. It is framed by palatial buildings designed by John Nash, the famed Regency-era architect and Decimus Burton, his protégé.
Westminster Pier, SW1A Westminster Pier is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Whitehall Court, SW1A Whitehall Court is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Whitehall Gardens, SW1A Whitehall Gardens is a road in the SW1A postcode area
Whitehall Place, SW1A Whitehall Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
York Buildings, WC2N York Buildings marks a house was built on this site in the 14th century for the bishops of Norwich.
York Place, WC2N York Place marks the location of a house on this site.


Westminster

Westminster - heart of government.

While the underground station dates from 1868, Westminster itself is almost as old as London itself. It has a large concentration of London’s historic and prestigious landmarks and visitor attractions, including the Palace of Westminster, Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Cathedral.

Historically part of the parish of St Margaret in the City and Liberty of Westminster and the county of Middlesex, the name Westminster was the ancient description for the area around Westminster Abbey – the West Minster, or monastery church, that gave the area its name – which has been the seat of the government of England (and later the British government) for almost a thousand years.

Westminster is the location of the Palace of Westminster, a UNESCO World Heritage Site which houses the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

The area has been the seat of the government of England for almost a thousand years. Westminster is thus often used as a metonym for Parliament and the political community of the United Kingdom generally. The civil service is similarly referred to by the area it inhabits, Whitehall, and Westminster is consequently also used in reference to the ’Westminster System’, the parliamentary model of democratic government that has evolved in the United Kingdom.

The historic core of Westminster is the former Thorney Island on which Westminster Abbey was built. The Abbey became the traditional venue of the coronation of the kings and queens of England. The nearby Palace of Westminster came to be the principal royal residence after the Norman conquest of England in 1066, and later housed the developing Parliament and law courts of England. It can be said that London thus has developed two distinct focal points: an economic one in the City of London; and a political and cultural one in Westminster, where the Royal Court had its home. This division is still very apparent today.

The monarchy later moved to the Palace of Whitehall a little towards the north-east. The law courts have since moved to the Royal Courts of Justice, close to the border of the City of London.

The Westminster area formed part of the City and Liberty of Westminster and the county of Middlesex. The ancient parish was St Margaret; after 1727 split into the parishes of St Margaret and St John. The area around Westminster Abbey formed the extra-parochial Close of the Collegiate Church of St Peter surrounded by—but not part of—either parish. Until 1900 the local authority was the combined vestry of St Margaret and St John (also known as the Westminster District Board of Works from 1855 to 1887), which was based at Westminster City Hall on Caxton Street from 1883. The Liberty of Westminster, governed by the Westminster Court of Burgesses, also included St Martin in the Fields and several other parishes and places. Westminster had its own quarter sessions, but the Middlesex sessions also had jurisdiction. The area was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London in 1889 and the local government of Westminster was reformed in 1900 when the court of burgesses and parish vestries were abolished, to be replaced with a metropolitan borough council. The council was given city status, allowing it to be known as Westminster City Council.

The underground station was opened as Westminster Bridge on 24 December 1868 by the steam-operated Metropolitan District Railway (MDR) (now the District line) when the railway opened the first section of its line from South Kensington. It was originally the eastern terminus of the MDR and the station cutting ended at a concrete wall buffered by timber sleepers. The approach to the station from the west runs in cut and cover tunnel under the roadway of Broad Sanctuary and diagonally under Parliament Square. In Broad Sanctuary the tunnel is close to Westminster Abbey and St Margaret’s church and care was required to avoid undermining their foundations when excavating in the poor ground found there.

The station was completely rebuilt to incorporate new deep-level platforms for the Jubilee line when it was extended to the London Docklands in the 1990s. During the works, the level of the sub-surface platforms was lowered to enable ground level access to Portcullis House. This was achieved in small increments carried out when the line was closed at night.


LOCAL PHOTOS
William Shakespeare
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Transmission
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Waterloo Bridge on an 1810 map.
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Hungerford Stairs circa 1828
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Aquarium
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
William Shakespeare
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Hungerford Stairs circa 1828
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Buses outside the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square.
Credit: Stockholm Transport Museum
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Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath (1749)
Credit: Canaletto
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London Hippodrome in 2017
Credit: Ethan Doyle White
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Sectional view of Wyld's Great Globe, which stood in Leicester Square, London 1851–62
Credit: Illustrated London News
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De Hems, 11 Macclesfield Street and the entrance to Horse & Dolphin Yard.
Credit: Colonel Warden
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The Strand front of Northumberland House (1752) The Percy Lion is atop the central façade and the statue of Charles I at right survives to this day.
Credit: Giovanni Canaletto
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The original, Brunel-built Hungerford Bridge.
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The Queen’s Theatre in the West End (2011), then showing the musical "Les Misérables"
Credit: Andreas Praefcke
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