Coach and Horses

Pub in/near Notting Hill Gate, existing until 1957

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(51.50892 -0.197775, 51.508 -0.197) 

Coach and Horses

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Pub · * · ·
MAY
30
2015
The Coach & Horses was situated at 108 Notting Hill Gate.

Mr Drinkwater, landlord of the Coach and Horses, then ‘still a small and primitive tavern’ was prosecuted for selling spirits at the Kensington Hippodrome in the 1830s.

In "Bygone Days", Florence Gladstone added in his defence, ‘the tavern itself was reputed to be quiet and respectable, instead of being a refuge for highwaymen as of old.’

The pub closed in 1957 and has now been demolished.

By 2015, the site was occupied by McDonald's beneath Campden Hill Towers.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


Coach and Horses</SPAN>

Coach and Horses

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Aubrey House Aubrey House is a large 18th-century detached house with two acres of gardens in the Campden Hill area of Holland Park.
Coach and Horses The Coach & Horses was situated at 108 Notting Hill Gate.
Horbury Chapel (Kensington Temple) In September 1849, the Horbury Chapel, Notting Hill was officially opened.
Ladbroke Square Garden Ladbroke Square communal garden lies in Notting Hill.
Mercury Theatre The Mercury Theatre was situated at 2a Ladbroke Road, next to the Kensington Temple.
Notting Hill in Bygone Days Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone, was originally published in 1924 by T. Fisher Unwin.
St John’s Hill St John’s Hill is the highest point in the area.
St John’s, Notting Hill St John’s Notting Hill is a Victorian Anglican church built in 1845 in Lansdowne Crescent, Notting Hill.

NEARBY STREETS
Airlie Gardens, W8 Airlie Gardens is named after the 5th Earl of Airlie (1826-1881), who lived on nearby Campden Hill at Holly Lodge.
Aubrey Road, W8 Aubrey Road leads into Aubrey Walk, which runs west of Campden Hill Road at the top of Campden Hill. It was named in the 1840s.
Aubrey Walk, W8 Aubrey Walk runs west of Campden Hill Road at the top of Campden Hill.
Bedford Gardens, W8 Bedford Gardens is one of the prime residential streets in Kensington.
Berkeley Gardens, W8 Berkeley Gardens is a short street which runs between Brunswick Gardens and Kensington Church Street containing terraced houses on both sides with small front gardens.
Boyne Terrace Mews, W11 Boyne Terrace Mews is a mews in Notting Hill, London W11.
Brunswick Gardens, W8 Brunswick Gardens runs north from Vicarage Gate - a wide tree-lined road with white stuccoed terraces on either side.
Bulmer Mews, W11 Bulmer Mews is a tiny mews behind Notting Hill Gate.
Callcott Street, W8 Callcott Street is a small street between Uxbridge Street and Hillgate Place.
Campden Hill Gardens, W8 Campden Hill Gardens runs northwards from Aubrey Walk.
Campden Hill Place, W11 Campden Hill Place is a road in the W11 postcode area
Campden Hill Square, W8 Campden Hill Square is a residential square consisting of large family houses.
Campden Hill Towers, W11 Campden Hill Towers is a block.
Campden Street, W8 Campden Street stretches between Campden Hill Road and Kensington Church Street.
Chepstow Crescent, W11 Chepstow Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Clanricarde Gardens, W2 Clanricarde Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Dawson Place, W2 Dawson Place is a street in Paddington.
Denbigh Close, W11 Denbigh Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Edge Street, W8 Edge Street is a street in Kensington.
Evesham House, W2 Residential block
Farm Place, W8 Farm Place was formerly called Earnest Street.
Farmer Street, W8 Farmer Street was formerly Farm Street.
Hillgate Place, W8 Hillgate Place was formerly Dartmoor Street.
Hillgate Street, W8 Hillgate Street was formerly Johnson Street.
Hillsleigh Road, W8 Hillsleigh Road is a street in Kensington.
Holland Walk, W8 Holland Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
Holland Walk, W8 Holland Walk is a street in Kensington.
Horbury Crescent, W11 Horbury Crescent is a short half-moon shaped street between Ladbroke Road and Kensington Park Road.
Horbury Mews, W11 Horbury Mews is a T-shaped mews in Notting Hill.
Ilchester Gardens, W2 Ilchester Gardens is a road in the W2 postcode area
Inverness Gardens, W8 Inverness Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Jameson Street, W8 Jameson Street was formerly St James or James Street.
Kensington Church Street, W8 Kensington Church Street is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Mall, W8 Kensington Mall is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Park Gardens, W11 Kensington Park Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Kensington Place, W8 Kensington Place is a street in Kensington.
Ladbroke Road, W11 Ladbroke Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Ladbroke Square, W11 The huge Ladbroke Square communal garden is part communal garden accessed from the backs of the houses lining it and part traditional London Square with roads between the houses and the square.
Ladbroke Terrace, W11 Ladbroke Terrace was one of the first streets to be created on the Ladbroke estate.
Ladbroke Walk, W11 Ladbroke Walk, W11 is part of the Ladbroke Conversation Area.
Lansdowne Walk, W11 Lansdowne Walk was named after the Lansdowne area of Cheltenham.
Linden Gardens, W2 Linden Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Linden Mews, W2 Linden Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Lucerne Mews, W8 Lucerne Mews is a street in Kensington.
Moscow Place, W2 Moscow Place is a street in Paddington.
Moscow Road, W2 Moscow Road is a street in Paddington.
Newcombe House, W2 Residential block
Notting Hill Gate, W8 Notting Hill Gate is a main shopping and retail street.
Orme Lane, W2 Orme Lane is a road in the W2 postcode area
Orme Square, W2 Orme Square is named after Edward Orme, formerly a printseller in Bond Street.
Ossington Street, W2 Ossington Street leads from Moscow Road at its north end to the Bayswater Road at its south end.
Palace Court, W2 Palace Court was built in the 1880s to connect the Bayswater Road to Moscow Road.
Palace Gardens Mews, W8 Palace Gardens Mews is a street in Kensington.
Palace Gardens Terrace, W8 Palace Gardens Terrace is a street in Kensington.
Peel Street, W8 Peel Street is a street in Kensington.
Pembridge Crescent, W11 Pembridge Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Gardens, W11 Pembridge Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Pembridge Mews, W11 Pembridge Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Road, W11 Pembridge Road is a street in London
Pembridge Road, W2 Pembridge Road is the former southern end of Portobello Lane.
Pembridge Square, W2 Pembridge Square is a street in Paddington.
Princes Mews, W2 Princes Mews is a street in Paddington.
Rabbit Roe, W8 Rabbit Roe is a street in Kensington.
Sheffield Terrace, W8 Sheffield Terrace is a street in Kensington.
Simon Close, W11 Simon Close is a street in Notting Hill.
St Petersburgh Mews, W2 St Petersburgh Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
St Petersburgh Place, W2 St Petersburgh Place is a street in Paddington.
Stanley Crescent, W11 Stanley Crescent was named after Edward Stanley.
Stanley Gardens, W11 Stanley Gardens was built in the 1850s.
Uxbridge Street, W8 Uxbridge Street is a street in Kensington.
Vicarage Gardens, W8 Vicarage Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Victoria Gardens, W11 Victoria Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Wilby Mews, W11 Wilby Mews was named after Benjamin Wilby, who was involved in several 19th century development schemes.
Wycombe Square, W8 Wycombe Square is a road in the W8 postcode area


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Children of Ruston Close
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Notting Hill
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Pembridge Road (1900s)
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201311211613
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Arundel Gardens
Credit: Barbara Avis
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Boyne Terrace Mews, W11
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3-4 Ladbroke Terrace in 2006.
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Notting Hill in Bygone Days
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Portobello Road, W11
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Notting Hill
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Pembridge Road (1900s)
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St Peter's Notting Hill
Credit: Asteuartw
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3-4 Ladbroke Terrace in 2006.
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Notting Hill in Bygone Days
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Ladbroke Walk seen from Ladbroke Terrace (2006)
Credit: Thomas Erskine
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Graffiti at Virgin Records Vernon Yard 1977
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Archer Street which became the westernmost section of Westbourne Grove.
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Stanley Gardens looking towards St Peter’s church.
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Ladbroke Square Garden
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