Wilton Crescent, SW1X

Road in/near Queen’s Park, existing between 1825 and now

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(51.50073 -0.15577, 51.5 -0.155) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · * · SW1X ·
JANUARY
11
2018
Wilton Crescent is notable for its affluent and politically important list of residents, present and historic.

Wilton Crescent was created by Thomas Cundy II, the Grosvenor family estate surveyor, and was drawn up with the original 1821 Wyatt plan for Belgravia. It was named at the time of Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton, second son of Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster on whose estate the road was built in 1825.

In the 19th and 20th centuries, it was home to many prominent British politicians, ambassadors and civil servants. Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma (1900–1979) lived at 2 Wilton Crescent for many years, marked today by an attributive blue plaque. Akin to nearby developments, Wilton Crescent is characterised by grand terraces with lavish white houses which are built in a crescent shape, many of them with stuccoed balconies, particularly on the southern part of the crescent. The Portland stone-clad, five-storey houses toward the north are high and were refaced between 1908 and 1912 via architects Balfour and Turner. Most of the houses had originally been built in the stucco style, but such houses became stone-clad during this renovation period. Other houses today have black iron balconies.

Wilton Crescent lies east of Lowndes Square and Lowndes Street, to the northwest of Belgrave Square. It is accessed via Wilton Place which connects it to the main road in Knightsbridge. Grosvenor Crescent is to the east, which contains the Indonesian Embassy. Further to the east is the back of Buckingham Palace and London Victoria station. In 2007, Wilton Garden in the middle of the crescent won a bronze medal from the London Gardens Society.

There are two diplomatic buildings in Wilton Crescent: the High Commission of Singapore at No. 9, and the Embassy of Luxembourg at No. 27 (formerly home to the Luxembourgish government-in-exile).

The 50 buildings, some subdivided, forming the headline Wilton Crescent addresses are listed at Grade II. The crescent is split into three terraces of lengthy proportion buildings, plus 31 which forms a terrace with 1-15 Grosvenor Crescent, plus 32 and 33 which face the opposing side of a brief continuation of the eastern broad link into Belgrave Square which form a terrace with 1-11 Belgrave Square. The western broad link into Belgrave Square is however termed Wilton Terrace, split into 1-3 Wilton Terrace and is of identical date, style and proportions.


Main source: http://www.grosvenorlondon.com/getattachment/our-customers/Residential/WALKING-IN-BELGRAVIA.pdf
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

Reply

Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
roger morris   
Added: 16 Oct 2021 08:50 GMT   

Atherton Road, IG5 (1958 - 1980)
I moved to Atherton road in 1958 until 1980 from Finsbury Park. My father purchased the house from his brother Sydney Morris. My father continued to live there until his death in 1997, my mother having died in 1988.
I attended The Glade Primary School in Atherton Road from sept 1958 until 1964 when I went to Beal School. Have fond memories of the area and friends who lived at no2 (Michael Clark)and no11 (Brian Skelly)

Reply
Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Comment
Simon Chalton   
Added: 10 Oct 2021 21:52 GMT   

Duppas Hill Terrace 1963- 74
I’m 62 yrs old now but between the years 1963 and 1975 I lived at number 23 Duppas Hill Terrace. I had an absolutely idyllic childhood there and it broke my heart when the council ordered us out of our home to build the Ellis Davd flats there.The very large house overlooked the fire station and we used to watch them practice putting out fires in the blue tower which I believe is still there.
I’m asking for your help because I cannot find anything on the internet or anywhere else (pictures, history of the house, who lived there) and I have been searching for many, many years now.
Have you any idea where I might find any specific details or photos of Duppas Hill Terrace, number 23 and down the hill to where the subway was built. To this day it saddens me to know they knocked down this house, my extended family lived at the next house down which I think was number 25 and my best school friend John Childs the next and last house down at number 27.
I miss those years so terribly and to coin a quote it seems they just disappeared like "tears in rain".
Please, if you know of anywhere that might be able to help me in any way possible, would you be kind enough to get back to me. I would be eternally grateful.
With the greatest of hope and thanks,
Simon Harlow-Chalton.


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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

Reply
Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
48 Belgrave Square 48 Belgrave Square was occupied for the same family for 170 years.
Belgravia Belgravia is an affluent area of Westminster, north of Victoria Station.
Down Street Down Street, also known as Down Street (Mayfair), is a disused station on the London Underground, located in Mayfair.
Halkin Hotel The Halkin (styled as The Halkin by COMO) is a 5-star hotel.
Hyde Park Corner At the other end of Park Lane from Marble Arch, Hyde Park Corner has struck terror into many a learner driver.
InterContinental London InterContinental London Park Lane is a luxury 5-star hotel.
London Lock Hospital The London Lock Hospital was the first venereal disease clinic.
Memorial Gates The Memorial Gates are a war memorial located at the Hyde Park Corner end of Constitution Hill in London.
Parkside Park Side was situated on the north side of Knightsbridge.
RAF Bomber Command Memorial The Royal Air Force Bomber Command Memorial is a memorial commemorating the crews of RAF Bomber Command who embarked on missions during the Second World War.
Royal Aeronautical Society The Royal Aeronautical Society, also known as the RAeS, is a British-founded multidisciplinary professional institution dedicated to the global aerospace community.
Royal Air Force Club The Royal Air Force Club (often referred to as the RAF Club) is situated at 128 Piccadilly.
Royal Artillery Memorial The Royal Artillery Memorial is a stone memorial at Hyde Park Corner, dedicated to the First World War casualties of the Royal Regiment of Artillery.
St Paul’s Church, Knightsbridge St Paul’s Church, Knightsbridge is a Grade II* listed Anglican church.
The Berkeley The Berkeley is a five star deluxe hotel, located in Wilton Place.
Wellington Arch Wellington Arch is located to the south of Hyde Park at the western corner of Green Park.

NEARBY STREETS
Albert Gate, SW1X Albert Gate is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Ann’s Close, SW1X Ann’s Close is approached through an entrance under a building on Kinnerton Street.
Apsley Way, SW1X Apsley Way is the formal name for the pathway which runs under Wellington Arch.
Basil Mansions, SW1X Basil Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Basil Street, SW1X Basil Street is split into two by Hans Crescent.
Beauford Gardens, SW3 Beauford Gardens is a location in London.
Belgrave Mews North, SW1X Belgrave Mews North is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Belgrave Mews South, SW1X Belgrave Mews South is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Belgrave Mews West, SW1X Belgrave Mews West is home to the Star Tavern, former rendezvous of the Great Train Robbers.
Belgrave Place, SW1X Belgrave Place is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Belgrave Square, SW1X Thomas Cubitt’s greatest achievement, Belgrave Square, is the grandest and largest of his squares, and is the centrepiece of Belgravia.
Bowater House, SW3 Residential block
Bradbrook House, SW1X Bradbrook House is a residential block on Duplex Ride.
Brompton Road, SW1X Brompton Road lies partly in Westminster and partly in Kensington and Chelsea.
Chapel Street, SW1X Chapel Street runs south-west to north-east from Belgrave Square to Grosvenor Place.
Chesham Mews, SW1X Chesham Mews is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Chesham Place, SW1X Chesham Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Chester Close, SW1X Chester Close lies off of Chester Street.
Chester Mews, SW1X Chester Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Chester Street, SW1X Chester Street dates from 1805.
Down Street Mews, W1J Down Street Mews is a largely hidden side street in Mayfair.
Duke of Wellington Place, SW1X Duke of Wellington Place is the official name for the road which skirts the central Hyde Park Corner island on the south and east sides.
Duplex Ride, SW1X Duplex Ride is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Eaton Row, SW1W Eaton Hall in Cheshire is the principal seat of the Duke of Westminster, owner of these streets and land of Belgravia.
Frederic Mews, SW1X Frederic Mews is a mews off Kinnerton Street.
Groom Place, SW1X Groom Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Grosvenor Crescent Mews, SW1X Grosvenor Crescent Mews is a gated mews.
Grosvenor Crescent, SW1X Grosvenor Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Grosvenor Place, SW1X Grosvenor Place is the main road connecting Hyde Park Corner with Victoria.
Halkin Arcade, SW1X Halkin Arcade is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Halkin Street, SW1X Halkin Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Hamilton Mews, W1J Hamilton Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Hamilton Place, W1J Hamilton Place lies just to the north of Hyde Park Corner.
Hans Crescent, SW1X Hans Crescent forms part of an area informally called Hans Town which dates back to the 18th century.
Hans Place, SW1X Hans Place, a square, is named after Sir Hans Sloane, physician and collector, whose bequest became the foundation of the British Museum.
Hans Road, SW1X Hans Road is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Hans Road, SW3 Hans Road dates from the late eighteenth century.
Hans Street, SW1X Hans Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Harriet Street, SW1X Harriet Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Harriet Walk, SW1X Harriet Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Harrods Green, SW1X Harrods Green is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Headfort Place, SW1X Headfort Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Herbert Crescent, SW1X Herbert Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Hobart Place, SW1W Hobart Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Holforoad Way, W1J A street within the W1J postcode
Holforoad Way, W1J A street within the W1J postcode
Hyde Park Corner, W1J Hyde Park Corner is a major road junction at the southeastern corner of Hyde Park.
Hyde Parks Barracks, Hyde Parks Barracks lies within the postcode.
Jefferson House, SW1X Jefferson House is a residential block on Basil Street.
Kinnerton Place North, SW1X Kinnerton Place North is a mews off Kinnerton Street.
Kinnerton Place South, SW1X Kinnerton Place South is a mews off Kinnerton Street.
Kinnerton Street, SW1X Kinnerton Street - a small winding street - was originally the service road for Wilton Place and Wilton Crescent.
Kinnerton Yard, SW1X Kinnerton Yard is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Knightsbridge Court, SW1X Knightsbridge Court is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Knightsbridge Green, SW1X Knightsbridge Green is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Knightsbridge, SW1X Knightsbridge is a main thoroughfare running along the south side of Hyde Park.
Lanesborough Place, SW1X Lanesborough Place is a small street serving The Lanesborough Hotel.
Little Chester Street, SW1X Little Chester Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Lowndes Square, SW1X Lowndes Square is named after the Secretary to the Treasury William Lowndes.
Lowndes Street, SW1X Lowndes Street was built by Thomas Cubitt and Seth Smith.
Lyall Mews, SW1X Lyall Mews is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Montrose Place, SW1X Montrose Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Motcomb Street, SW1X Motcomb Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
New Ride, SW1X New Ride is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Old Barrack Yard, SW1X Old Barrack Yard is a narrow street of terraced cottages.
Old Park Lane, W1J Old Park Lane is a road in the W1J postcode area
Park Close, SW1X Park Close is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Park Mansions, SW1X Park Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Pembroke Close, SW1X Pembroke Close is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Peninsular Tower, SW1X Peninsular Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW7 postal area.
Pont St Mews, SW1X Pont St Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Pont Street Mews, SW1X This is a street in the SW1X postcode area
Pont Street, SW1X Pont Street is a fashionable street in Knightsbridge/Belgravia, not far from the Knightsbridge department store Harrods to the north-west.
Queen’s Gardens, SW1X Queen’s Gardens was developed in about 1768–70.
Raphael Street, SW7 Raphael Street was laid out by Lewis Raphael who bought it from former owner Durs Egg’s heirs in 1838.
Roberts Mews, SW1X Roberts Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Rotten Row, SW1X Rotten Row is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Sloane Street, SW1X Sloane Street runs north to south, from Knightsbridge to Sloane Square, taking its name from Sir Hans Sloane, who purchased the surrounding area in 1712.
South Carriage Drive, SW1X South Carriage Drive is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Stackhouse Street, SW1X Stackhouse Street is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Studio Place, SW1X Studio Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Upper Belgrave Street, SW1X Upper Belgrave Street was constructed in the 1840s to connect Belgrave Square with the King’s Road.
Walton Place, SW3 Walton Place is a location in London.
West Halkin Street, SW1X West Halkin Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
William Mews, SW1X William Mews is a partially redeveloped, private Mews off Lowndes Square.
William Mews, SW1X A street within the SW1X postcode
William Street, SW1X William Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Wilton Mews, SW1X Wilton Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Wilton Place, SW1X Wilton Place was built in 1825 to connect Belgravia with Knightsbridge.
Wilton Row, SW1X Wilton Row is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Wilton Street, SW1X Wilton Street was built in 1817.
Wilton Terrace, SW1X Wilton Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Pakenham Tavern The Pakenham Tavern was a pub on the western side of Knightsbridge Green.
Rose & Crown This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Rose and Crown On the south side of the road, between Knightsbridge Green and Rutland Gate was the Rose and Crown.
The Gloucester This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
White Hart Inn The White Hart Inn stood opposite the Knightsbridge Leper Hospital on the bank of the Westbourne.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Boscobel Oaks, 1804
TUM image id: 1487173198
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Belgrave Square
Credit: Thomas Shepherd
TUM image id: 1586353394
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Grosvenor Gardens Mews East
TUM image id: 1544975168
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Lowndes Street, c. 1905.
TUM image id: 1483984242
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Walton Street, SW3
TUM image id: 1466549385
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Edbury Square, c. 1906.
TUM image id: 1483984627
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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The Wellington Statue on the Arch in the 1850s
Credit: Unknown
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Exterior of the memorial in 2013.
Credit: Tim Rademacher
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Wellington Arch photographed on 10 January 2017. Wellington Arch was built as an original entrance to Buckingham Palace, later becoming a victory arch proclaiming Wellington’s defeat of Napoleon. Crowned by the largest bronze sculpture in Europe, it depicts the Angel of Peace descending on the ’Quadriga’ - or four-horsed chariot - of War. The pathway that runs underneath the arch has a formal name - Apsley Way.
Credit: The Underground Map
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Belgrave Square
Credit: Thomas Shepherd
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Cadogan Place gardens, SW1. The northern garden was laid out by Humphry Repton in 1806. Repton laid out winding paths and created ridges and dips from excavated soil.
Credit: Instagram/@the lois edit
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Letter to Chuck Berry from Carl Sagan
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Eaton Square
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
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Hyde Park Corner in 1842, looking east towards Piccadilly. The entrance to Hyde Park through Decimus Burton’s Ionic Screen is on the left, and behind it, in darker stone, is Apsley House.
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Lowndes Street, c. 1905.
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Boscobel Place
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