Bridge House

Large house in/near Bermondsey, existed from 1705 but redeveloped after the Second World War.

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(51.50125 -0.06893, 51.501 -0.068) 
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Large house · * · ·
MAY
7
2019
Built around 1705 and demolished in 1950, Bridge House in George Row was once surrounded by the Jacob’s Island rookery.

Jacob’s Island was immortalised by Charles Dickens’s novel ’Oliver Twist’, in which the principal villain Bill Sikes meets a nasty end in the mud of ’Folly Ditch’.

Dickens was taken to this then-impoverished and unsavory location by the officers of the river police, with whom he would occasionally go on patrol. When a local politician attempted to deny the very existence of Jacob’s Island, Dickens gave him short shrift, describing the area as the filthiest, the strangest, the most extraordinary of the many localities that are hidden in London. The area was once notoriously squalid and described as The very capital of cholera and The Venice of drains by the Morning Chronicle of 1849.

The ditches were filled in the early 1850s, and the area later redeveloped as warehouses.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Wendy    
Added: 22 Mar 2024 15:33 GMT   

Polygon Buildings
Following the demolition of the Polygon, and prior to the construction of Oakshott Court in 1974, 4 tenement type blocks of flats were built on the site at Clarendon Sq/Phoenix Rd called Polygon Buildings. These were primarily for people working for the Midland Railway and subsequently British Rail. My family lived for 5 years in Block C in the 1950s. It seems that very few photos exist of these buildings.

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Steve   
Added: 19 Mar 2024 08:42 GMT   

Road construction and houses completed
New Charleville Circus road layout shown on Stanford’s Library Map Of London And Its Suburbs 1879 with access via West Hill only.

Plans showing street numbering were recorded in 1888 so we can concluded the houses in Charleville Circus were built by this date.

Source: Charleville Circus, Sydenham, London

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Comment
Steve   
Added: 19 Mar 2024 08:04 GMT   

Charleville Circus, Sydenham: One Place Study (OPS)
One Place Study’s (OPS) are a recent innovation to research and record historical facts/events/people focused on a single place �’ building, street, town etc.

I have created an open access OPS of Charleville Circus on WikiTree that has over a million members across the globe working on a single family tree for everyone to enjoy, for free, forever.

Source: Charleville Circus, Sydenham, London

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Comment
Charles   
Added: 8 Mar 2024 20:45 GMT   

My House
I want to know who lived in my house in the 1860’s.

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NH   
Added: 7 Mar 2024 11:41 GMT   

Telephone House
Donald Hunter House, formerly Telephone House, was the BT Offices closed in 2000

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Comment
Paul Cox   
Added: 5 Mar 2024 22:18 GMT   

War damage reinstatement plans of No’s 11 & 13 Aldine Street
Whilst clearing my elderly Mothers house of general detritus, I’ve come across original plans (one on acetate) of No’s 11 & 13 Aldine Street. Might they be of interest or should I just dispose of them? There are 4 copies seemingly from the one single acetate example. Seems a shame to just junk them as the level of detail is exquisite. No worries if of no interest, but thought I’d put it out there.

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Comment
Diana   
Added: 28 Feb 2024 13:52 GMT   

New Inn Yard, E1
My great grandparents x 6 lived in New Inn Yard. On this date, their son was baptised in nearby St Leonard’s Church, Shoreditch

Source: BDM London, Cripplegate and Shoreditch registers written by church clerk.

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Comment
Vic Stanley   
Added: 24 Feb 2024 17:38 GMT   

Postcose
The postcode is SE15, NOT SE1

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LOCAL PHOTOS
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Byward Tower, 1893
TUM image id: 1556882285
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Mill Street, SE1 (1987)
TUM image id: 1682593586
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Folly Ditch, Jacob’s Island in the 19th century. Jacob’s Island was a notorious Bermondsey slum, cleared in the 1860s.
Credit: Old and New London (published 1873)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Turk’s Head, Wapping High Street (1890)
Credit: The Art Journal
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Enid Street, SE16 looking from Rouel Road (1938) The houses had railway arches just outside their back doors. The original Lion pub can just be seen on the right corner and at the far end on the same side was The Windsor Castle. Both pubs survived the pre and post war slum clearance of the houses by Bermondsey Borough Council. The Lion was replaced in 1961 on the corner of Spa Road but The Windsor was demolished c.1965 and never rebuilt. The same view nowadays would include high modern flats to the left.
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Jamaica Road (1900s) Despite being a road of eighteenth century origin, the western end of Jamaica Road, Bermondsey only dates from the 1960s.
Old London postcard
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Tram travelling along Jamaica Road (1912) This section of Jamaica Road was completely swept away when the road was realigned during the 1960s.
Old London postcard
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Mill Street, SE1 (1987)
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Old Jamaica Road, SE16 (2012) Part of the Bermondsey Spa development, the curved building in this view includes a health centre. Bermondsey Spa is a major housing development in the area between the London-Greenwich Railway line and Jamaica Road, in the early years of the 21st century. The terraced housing that occupied most of the site was cleared by the 1950s.
Credit: Geograph/Stephen Craven
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Parker’s Row, SE1 on 19 May 1956
Credit: Serge Lansac/Picture Post/Hulton Archive
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Spa Road station (c.1900) Spa Road station was one of the first of London’s railway stations, built by the London & Greenwich Railway (later the South Eastern and Chatham railway) in 1836
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Wilson Grove, SE16 Wilson Grove includes a mini ’garden city’ with houses built in 1928 by Culpin & Bowers.
Credit: Geograph/Stephen Richards
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