91 Fernhead Road, W9 3JY

Address in/near West Kilburn, existing until now

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MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Address · West Kilburn · W9 ·
November
7
2016
91 Fernhead Road was the family home of actor Norman Wisdom.

Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in Marylebone on 4 February 1915. The family lived at 91 Fernhead Road, Maida Vale, London W9, where they slept in one room. Wisdom quipped, "I was born in very sorry circumstances. Both of my parents were very sorry."

After a period in a children’s home in Deal, Kent, Wisdom ran away when he was 11 but returned to become an errand boy in a grocer’s shop on leaving school at 13. Having been kicked out of his home by his father and become homeless, in 1929 he walked (by his own account) to Cardiff, Wales, where he became a cabin boy in the Merchant Navy. He later also worked as a coal miner, waiter and page boy.

He enlisted as a drummer boy in the 10th Royal Hussars of the British Army. In 1930 he was posted to Lucknow, in the United Provinces of British India, as a bandsman. There he gained an education certificate, rode horses, became the flyweight boxing champion of the British Army in India and learned to play the trumpet and clarinet.

Whilst performing a shadow boxing routine in an army gym during the Second World War, Wisdom discovered he had a talent for entertainment, and began to develop his skills as a musician and stage entertainer.

After being demobilised in 1946, Wisdom made his debut as a professional entertainer at the age of 31; his rise to the top was phenomenally fast. Initially the straight man to the magician David Nixon, he had already adopted the costume that would remain his trademark: tweed flat cap askew, with peak turned up; a suit at least two sizes too tight; a crumpled collar and a mangled tie. The character that went with this costume—known as "the Gump"— was to dominate Wisdom’s film career. A West End theatre star within two years, he honed his performance skills mainly between theatres in London and Brighton. Wisdom made his TV debut the same year and was soon commanding enormous audiences.

Wisdom made a series of low-budget star-vehicle comedies for the Rank Organisation, beginning with Trouble in Store in 1953. This film earned him a BAFTA Award for Most Promising Newcomer to Film in 1954 and exhibitors voted him the tenth biggest star at the British box office the same year. His films’ cheerful, unpretentious appeal make them the direct descendants of those made a generation earlier by George Formby.] Never highly thought of by the critics, they were very popular with domestic audiences and Wisdom’s films were among Britain’s biggest box office successes of their day. They were also successful in some unlikely overseas markets, helping Rank stay afloat financially when their more expensive film projects were unsuccessful.

After a career lull, Wisdom became prominent again in the 1990s, helped by the young comedian Lee Evans, whose act was often compared to Wisdom’s work. His classic Rank films were playing to new audiences on television screens and DVD, with a growing number of new young fans in the United Kingdom and abroad. The high point of this new popularity was the knighthood he was awarded, for services to entertainment, in the 2000 New Year’s honours list. During the ceremony, once he had received his knighthood, he walked away and again performed his trademark trip, at which the Queen smiled and laughed.

From 1995 until 2004 he appeared in the recurring role of Billy Ingleton in the long-running BBC comedy Last of the Summer Wine. The role was originally a one-off appearance, but proved so popular that he returned as the character on a number of occasions. In 1996, he received a Special Achievement Award from the London Film Critics.

Wisdom announced his retirement from the entertainment industry on his 90th birthday (4 February 2005). He announced that he intended to spend more time with his family, playing golf and driving around the Isle of Man, where he was living.

He died on 4 October 2010 at Abbotswood nursing home on the Isle of Man at the age of 95.


Main source: Norman Wisdom - Wikipedia
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:30 GMT   

Kilburn Park - opened 1915
Kilburn Park station was opened at the height of the First World War

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:49 GMT   

A bit of a lift....
Kilburn Park was the first station to be designed around escalators, rather than lifts.

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Comment
Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:48 GMT   

Mary Place Workhouse
There was a lady called Ivy who lived in the corner she use to come out an tell us kids off for climbing over the fence to play football on the green. Those were the days.

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charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

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Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 24 Nov 2020 14:25 GMT   

The 1879 Agricultural Show
The 1879 Royal Agricultural Society of England’s annual show was held on an area which later became Queen’s Park and opened on 30 June 1879.

The show ran for a week but the poor weather meant people had to struggle through deep mud and attendances fell disastrously. The visit to the show by Queen Victoria on the fifth day rallied visitors and nearly half the people who visited the show went on that day.

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Comment
GRaleigh   
Added: 23 Feb 2021 09:34 GMT   

Found a bug
Hi all! Thank you for your excellent site. I found an overlay bug on the junction of Glengall Road, NW6 and Hazelmere Road, NW6 on the 1950 map only. It appears when one zooms in at this junction and only on the zoom.

Cheers,
Geoff Raleigh

Source: Glengall Road, NW6

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The Underground Map   
Added: 25 Feb 2021 13:11 GMT   

Glengall Road, NW6
Thanks Geoff!

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Lived here
Brenda Jackson   
Added: 13 Aug 2017 21:39 GMT   

83 Pembroke Road
My Gt Gt grandparents lived at 83 Pembroke Road before it became Granville Road, They were married in 1874, John Tarrant and Maryann Tarrant nee Williamson.

Her brother George Samuel Williamson lived at 95 Pembroke Road with his wife Emily and children in the 1881 Census

Apparently the extended family also lived for many years in Alpha Place, Canterbury Road, Peel Road,

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 28 Dec 2020 08:31 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
I was born in Hammersmith Hospital (Ducane Rd) I lived at 40 Blecynden Street from birth in 1942 to 1967 when I moved due to oncoming demolition for the West way flyover.
A bomb fell locally during the war and cracked one of our windows, that crack was still there the day I left.
It was a great street to have grown up in I have very fond memories of living there.



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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:30 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Went to school St Johns with someone named Barry Green who lived in that St. Use to wait for him on the corner take a slow walk an end up being late most days.

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

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Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

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Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:27 GMT   

Hewer Street, W10
My husband Barry Newton lived over John Nodes in Hewer Street in 1950’s. Barry dad Tom worked for John Nodes and raced pigeons in his spare time Tom and his Lena raised 5 sons there before moving to the Southcoast in the mid 70’s due to Tom ill health

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
roger morris   
Added: 16 Oct 2021 08:50 GMT   

Atherton Road, IG5 (1958 - 1980)
I moved to Atherton road in 1958 until 1980 from Finsbury Park. My father purchased the house from his brother Sydney Morris. My father continued to live there until his death in 1997, my mother having died in 1988.
I attended The Glade Primary School in Atherton Road from sept 1958 until 1964 when I went to Beal School. Have fond memories of the area and friends who lived at no2 (Michael Clark)and no11 (Brian Skelly)

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Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Simon Chalton   
Added: 10 Oct 2021 21:52 GMT   

Duppas Hill Terrace 1963- 74
I’m 62 yrs old now but between the years 1963 and 1975 I lived at number 23 Duppas Hill Terrace. I had an absolutely idyllic childhood there and it broke my heart when the council ordered us out of our home to build the Ellis Davd flats there.The very large house overlooked the fire station and we used to watch them practice putting out fires in the blue tower which I believe is still there.
I’m asking for your help because I cannot find anything on the internet or anywhere else (pictures, history of the house, who lived there) and I have been searching for many, many years now.
Have you any idea where I might find any specific details or photos of Duppas Hill Terrace, number 23 and down the hill to where the subway was built. To this day it saddens me to know they knocked down this house, my extended family lived at the next house down which I think was number 25 and my best school friend John Childs the next and last house down at number 27.
I miss those years so terribly and to coin a quote it seems they just disappeared like "tears in rain".
Please, if you know of anywhere that might be able to help me in any way possible, would you be kind enough to get back to me. I would be eternally grateful.
With the greatest of hope and thanks,
Simon Harlow-Chalton.


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Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Beethoven Street School Beethoven Street School was opened in 1881 to serve the community of the newly-built Queen's Park Estate.
Corner of Caird Street and Lancefield Street (1910) The corner of Caird Street with Lancefield Street.
Harrow Road (1920s) Harrow Road in the 1920s, looking south east towards the Prince of Wales pub and the Emmanuel Church spire.
Hudson’s the chemist (1906) Hudson's, a chemist shop, stood on the corner of Ilbert Street and Third Avenue in the Queen's Park estate.
Jack of Newbury The Jack of Newbury stood at the corner of East Row and Kensal Road until it was bombed on 2 October 1940.
Kilburn Lane Farm A farm existed in Kilburn Lane until the 1860s, by which time it had been disrupted by the railway line.
Lancefield Coachworks Lancefield Coachworks was a builder of bespoke bodies for expensive car chassis always introducing sporting elements into designs.
Wedlake Street Baths In a time when most had somewhere to live but few had somewhere to wash at home, public baths were the place to go...

NEARBY STREETS
Abinger Mews, W9 Abinger Mews is a street in Maida Vale.
Alperton Street, W10 Alperton Street is the first alphabetically named street in the Queen’s Park Estate, W10.
Argo House, NW6 Argo House is a location in London.
Ashmore Road, W9 Ashmore Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Barfett Street, W10 Barfett Street is a street on the Queen’s Park Estate, W10
Barnsdale Road, W9 Barnsdale Road runs between Fernhead Road and Walterton Road.
Beethoven Street, W10 Beethoven Street is a street in the Queen’s Park Estate.
Bradiston Road, W9 Bradiston Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Bravington Road, W9 Bravington Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Bruckner Street, W10 Bruckner Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Burlington Close, W9 Burlington Close is a street in Maida Vale.
Caird Street, W10 Caird Street is the ’C’ street on the Queen’s Park Estate
Cambridge Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Chippenham Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Chippenham Road, W9 Chippenham Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Coomassie Road, W9 Coomassie Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Croxley Road, W9 Croxley Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Dart Street, W10 Dart Street runs eastwards from Third Avenue and becomes Marban Road.
Denholme Road, W9 Denholme Road connects Fernhead Road with Saltram Crescent.
Dowland Street, W10 Dowland Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Drayford Close, W9 Drayford Close is a street in Maida Vale.
Enbrook Street, W10 Enbrook Street is another street north of Harrow Road, W10 without a pub.
Essendine Mansions, W9 Essendine Mansions is a block on Essendine Road.
Essendine Road, W9 Essendine Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Farrant Street, W10 Farrant Street is the missing link in the alphabetti spaghetti of the streetnames of the Queen’s Park Estate
Fernhead Road, W9 Fernhead Road is a street in Maida Vale.
First Avenue, W10 First Avenue is street number one in the Queen's Park Estate
Fordingley Road, W9 Fordingley Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Godson Yard, NW6 Godson Yard is a new development dating from 2005.
Granville Road, NW6 Granville Road, NW6 was formerly Pembroke Road.
Grittleton Road, W9 Grittleton Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Hansel Road, NW6 Hansel Road is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Heather Walk, W10 Heather Walk lies in the Queen’s Park Estate
Herries Street, W10 Herries Street is a street in the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
James Collins Close, W9 James Collins Close is a street in Maida Vale.
John Fearon Walk, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Kensal Road, W10 Kensal Road, originally called Albert Road, is the heart of Kensal Town.
Kilburn Lane, NW6 Kilburn Lane is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Kilburn Lane, W9 Kilburn Lane is a street in Maida Vale.
Kilburn Park Road, NW6 Kilburn Park Road was built along the course of the Bayswater Rivulet (the River Westbourne), starting in 1855
Lancefield Street, W10 Lancefield Street runs from Caird Street to Bruckner Street.
Lanhill Road, W9 Lanhill Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Lydford Road, W9 Lydford Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Macroom Road, W9 Macroom Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Malvern Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Malvern Mews, NW6 Malvern Mews is a road in the W9 postcode area
Malvern Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Malvern Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Marban Road, W9 Marban Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Masefield House, NW6 Residential block
Mozart Street, W10 Mozart Street was part of the second wave of development of the Queen’s Park Estate.
Nelson Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Neville Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Neville Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Nexus Court, NW6 Nexus Court is a location in London.
Onslow Close, W10 Onslow Close is in the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Parry Road, W10 Parry Road is on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Peel Precinct, NW6 Peel Precinct is a road in the NW6 postcode area
Pennymore Walk, W9 Pennymore Walk is a close which lies off of Ashmore Road.
Pentland Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Portnall Road, W9 Portnall Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Riverton Close, W9 Riverton Close is a street in Maida Vale.
Saltram Crescent, W9 Saltram Crescent is a street in Maida Vale.
Second Avenue, W10 Second Avenue is one of the streets of the Queen's Park Estate, W10
Selby Square, W10 Selby Square is a walkway in the Queen’s Park Estate
Severn Avenue, W10 Severn Avenue is a newer thoroughfare in the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Shirland Mews, W9 Shirland Mews is a street in Maida Vale.
Shirland Road, W9 Shirland Road is one of the main thorughfares of Maida Vale.
Stafford Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Stafford Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Stansbury Square, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Stuart Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Symphony Mews, W10 Symphony Mews is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Third Avenue, W10 Third Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Tolhurst Drive, W10 Tolhurst Drive is a street in the Queen's Park Estate
Tollbridge Close, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Verdi Crescent, W10 Verdi Crescent is a post-war development, lying off of Herries Street.
Walterton Road, W9 Walterton Road was the central road of a suburb which was originally proposed to called St. Peter’s Park.
Warlock Road, W9 Warlock Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Wedlake Street, W10 Wedlake Street arrived as the second wave of building in Kensal Town was completed.
Widley Road, W9 Widley Road is a street in Maida Vale.
William Saville House, NW6 Residential block

NEARBY PUBS
Chippenham This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Jack of Newbury The Jack of Newbury stood at the corner of East Row and Kensal Road until it was bombed on 2 October 1940.
Kensal Community Centre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Royal British Legion (West Kilburn) Ltd This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Tomatoes from Tesco
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Coronation street party, 1953.
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1879 Royal Agricultural Society Show
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The Albion, now in residential use.
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Bosworth Road, W10
TUM image id: 1453369722
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Caird Street street sign.
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Munro Mews, W10
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Great Western Road (1959)
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In the neighbourhood...

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The corner of Caird Street with Lancefield Street.
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New flats featuring in a photo taken from Adair Road (1962)
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Caird Street street sign.
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Barnsdale Road, Paddington lies between Fernhead Road and Walterton Road.
Old London postcard
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Adair Road junction with Southam Street (1932)
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18th century print of a Middlesex farm.
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The Mitre (1969)
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Weston’s Cider House
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Adair Road street sign.
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The corner of Kensal Place and Southam Street during a 1960s winter.
Credit: London Metropolitan Archives
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