Red Lion

Pub in/near Queen’s Park, existed between 1891 and 1962

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(51.67666 -0.27457, 51.676 -0.274) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Pub · * · WD6 ·
JUNE
29
2017
The Red Lion was one of two pubs in Green Street.

The other pub, The Green Willows, lay a little way to the south.

On the 1900 map, the Red Lion’s position is marked as a post office but it seems to have been licensed from 1891 onwards by the Weekes family (George, Alfred and Mary Ann).

Mrs Jemima Larkin took over in 1929 and was licensee throughout the 1930s. The Red Lion was in the 1950s run by a man called Ted Oakley.

A bus stop stood outside which served the 358 bus.

The Red Lion was finally demolished in 1962. It is thought that its business declined as newer pubs more convenient to the new Borehamwood estate were built.


Main source: Red Lion, Green Street, Shenley, Barnet, Hertfordshire
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Colin Trotman   
Added: 28 Oct 2020 14:35 GMT   

Old Red Lion
I feel your suggestion that the Old Red Lion on Green Street was ’demolished in 1962’ is incorrect; I was born in Borehamwood in 1957, and remember it well - must have therefore still been there in the mid sixties at least.

Reply
Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 24 Nov 2020 14:02 GMT   

Red Lion demolition
There were two pubs in Green Street. While our source of information may be incorrect, the second one we think DID last until the late 1960s as Patrick McGoohan drank there while creating ’The Prisoner’

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Comment
norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
roger morris   
Added: 16 Oct 2021 08:50 GMT   

Atherton Road, IG5 (1958 - 1980)
I moved to Atherton road in 1958 until 1980 from Finsbury Park. My father purchased the house from his brother Sydney Morris. My father continued to live there until his death in 1997, my mother having died in 1988.
I attended The Glade Primary School in Atherton Road from sept 1958 until 1964 when I went to Beal School. Have fond memories of the area and friends who lived at no2 (Michael Clark)and no11 (Brian Skelly)

Reply
Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Comment
Simon Chalton   
Added: 10 Oct 2021 21:52 GMT   

Duppas Hill Terrace 1963- 74
I’m 62 yrs old now but between the years 1963 and 1975 I lived at number 23 Duppas Hill Terrace. I had an absolutely idyllic childhood there and it broke my heart when the council ordered us out of our home to build the Ellis Davd flats there.The very large house overlooked the fire station and we used to watch them practice putting out fires in the blue tower which I believe is still there.
I’m asking for your help because I cannot find anything on the internet or anywhere else (pictures, history of the house, who lived there) and I have been searching for many, many years now.
Have you any idea where I might find any specific details or photos of Duppas Hill Terrace, number 23 and down the hill to where the subway was built. To this day it saddens me to know they knocked down this house, my extended family lived at the next house down which I think was number 25 and my best school friend John Childs the next and last house down at number 27.
I miss those years so terribly and to coin a quote it seems they just disappeared like "tears in rain".
Please, if you know of anywhere that might be able to help me in any way possible, would you be kind enough to get back to me. I would be eternally grateful.
With the greatest of hope and thanks,
Simon Harlow-Chalton.


Reply
Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Green Street Green Street was once a separate village from Borehamwood but is now on the edge of its urban area.
Green Willows The Green Willows pub seems to have existed from 1871 until the turn of the twentieth century.
Red Lion The Red Lion was one of two pubs in Green Street.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbots Place, WD6 Abbots Place lies just off of Cowley Hill.
Ayot Path, WD6 This is a street in the WD6 postcode area
Ayott Path, WD6 Ayott Path is a location in London.
Campions Close, WD6 This is a street in the WD6 postcode area
Green Street, WD6 Green Street is the modern name for the road which runs through the area, north to south, and which connects Borehamwood with Shenley.
Redwood Rise, WD6 Redwood Rise is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Stapleton Road, WD6 Stapleton Road was built in the third wave of Borehamwood development.

NEARBY PUBS
Green Willows The Green Willows pub seems to have existed from 1871 until the turn of the twentieth century.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Leeming Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469035628
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Campions School
TUM image id: 1526568075
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Tykeswater runs under the road in this view of Green Street looking south
Credit: David Howard
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To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Green Willows pub - Mrs Castle stands outside
Credit: Antony Coggins
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Leggatts Farm, just after the Second World War.
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Campions School
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

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