Whitestone Pond

Pond in/near Hampstead, existing until now.

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(51.56148 -0.17992, 51.561 -0.179) 
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Pond · * · NW3 ·
JANUARY
20
2017
Whitestone Pond is the source of one of London’s lost rivers, the River Westbourne.

Whitestone Pond lies 135 metres above the London Basin, and at the summit of Hampstead Heath marks the highest point in London.

The pond takes its name from the old milestone located at the top of Hampstead Grove, it can be seen just to the south and bears the inscription "IV miles from St Giles, 41/2 miles 29 yards from Holborn Bars".

Originally known as Horse Pond, fed solely by rain and dew, ramps were later added to allow horses to access the pond to drink and wash their hooves. Later it became affectionately known as Hampstead-on-Sea when the pond was used for paddling, floating model boats and skating in winter.

A water fountain, once located at the top of West Heath Road, became a local speaker’s corner and was the scene of angry fights between fascist groups and antagonists in the 1930s. Later it became a popular spot for donkey rides.

The adjacent flagstaff behind Whitestone Walk marks the historic location of the Hampstead Beacon, lit to warn of the impending invasion by the Spanish Armada in 1588.

Spaniards Road, once a notorious haunt of highwaymen in the eighteenth century, became a popular place to be seen promenading in the nineteenth century.

As the twentieth century drew to a close this area increasingly lost its appeal but thanks to restoration works, conceived and instigated by the Heath & Hampstead Society, extensive renovation was carried out over a two year period and completed in 2010 in collaboration with the City of London Corporation, Camden Council, English Heritage and Transport for London.
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

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Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:39 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
   
Added: 20 Jul 2024 01:13 GMT   

Whitechapel (1980 - 1981)
Diana Lee-Gobbitt - Artist rented a room at No 1 Berner Street, Whitechapel, opposite Church Passage (Ripper territory) for one year, rent approx 3 pounds pw. Worked as Receptionist for n Indian import/export company in the Watney Markets. Owner of No 1 Berner Street was Sammy Ferrugia, Maltese Taxi company owner. The artist was shown the gambling den in Dutfield’s Yard behind the terrace houses. It was common local knowledge prostitution was high end income for those in the East End during the 1950s.

Reply

   
Added: 7 Jul 2024 16:26 GMT   

Haycroft Gardens, NW10
My Grandfather bought No 45 Buchanan Gdns in I believe 1902 and died ther in the early 1950s

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Comment
   
Added: 7 Jul 2024 16:20 GMT   

Haycroft Gardens, NW10
I lived in No 7 from 1933 to 1938

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Sylvia guiver   
Added: 4 Jul 2024 14:52 GMT   

Grandparents 1937 lived 37 Blandford Square
Y mother and all her sisters and brother lived there, before this date , my parent wedding photographers were take in the square, I use to visit with my mother I remember the barge ballon in the square in the war.

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Born here
Roy Mathieson   
Added: 27 Jun 2024 16:25 GMT   

St Saviours
My great grandmother was born in Bowling Green Lane in 1848. The family moved from there to Earl Terrace, Bermondsey in 1849. I have never been able to locate Earl Terrace on maps.

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Added: 26 Jun 2024 13:10 GMT   

Buckhurst Street, E1
Mt grandfather, Thomas Walton Ward had a musical instrument workshop in Buckhurst Street from 1934 until the street was bombed during the war. Grandfather was a partner in the musical instrument firm of R.J. Ward and Sons of Liverpool. He died in 1945 and is buried in a common grave at Abney Park Cemetery.

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Lived here
Mike Dowling   
Added: 15 Jun 2024 15:51 GMT   

Family ties (1936 - 1963)
The Dowling family lived at number 13 Undercliffe Road for
Nearly 26 years. Next door was the Harris family

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Comment
Evie Helen   
Added: 13 Jun 2024 00:03 GMT   

Vickers Road
The road ’Vickers Road’ is numbered rather differently to other roads in the area as it was originally built as housing for the "Vickers" arms factory in the late 1800’s and early 1900s. Most of the houses still retain the original 19th century tiling and drainage outside of the front doors.

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LOCAL PHOTOS
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Victorian house under construction
TUM image id: 1483541885
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Soldier’s Daughters Home from the "Illustrated London News", June 19, 1858 The Royal School, Hampstead was founded in 1855 as the Soldiers’ Infant Home before becoming the Royal Soldiers’ Daughters’ School on this site in 1867. It was established "to nurse, board, clothe and educate the female children, orphans or not, of soldiers in Her Majesty’s Army killed in the Crimean War". The Daughter’s School, as described in 1902: "At the back a large extent of grass playground stretched out westward, and at the end of this there was a grove of trees. On one side of the grass is a large playroom built in 1880 by means of an opportune legacy, and on the other a covered cloister which led to the school, standing detached from the house at the other end of the playground. An old pier burdened with a mass of ivy stood up in the centre, the only remnant of this part of old Vane House. A portion of the ground was profitably sold for the frontage to Fitz John’s Avenue." The school site is now used as a senior campus of North Bridge House School.
Credit: The Illustrated London News
TUM image id: 1458756121
Licence:
Holly Walk, NW3
TUM image id: 1455451397
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Yorkshire Grey Place, NW3
TUM image id: 1456946471
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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The Old Bull and Bush The Old Bull and Bush, near Hampstead Heath, gave its name to the music hall song "Down at the old Bull and Bush" sung by Florrie Forde. The interior was renovated to a modern, gastropub style in 2006. Until the introduction of the smoking ban in England in 2007, The Bull and Bush was one of the few completely smoke-free pubs in London. The earliest record of a building on the site is of a farmhouse in 1645. The farmhouse gained a licence to sell ale in 1721. William Hogarth drank here, and is believed to have been involved in planting out the pub garden.
Old London postcard
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Church Row, NW3 Church Row is an eighteenth-century residential street. Many of the properties are listed on the National Heritage List for England. The writer H. G. Wells bought No. 17 in 1909 and lived there with his wife, Jane. The comedian Peter Cook bought No. 17 for £24,000 in 1965. Cook and Dudley Moore wrote their Pete & Dud routines in the attic.
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Church Row, Hampstead. This etching appears as the frontispiece of 'An introduction to Hampstead' by G.E. Mitton, published in 1902.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Branch Hill Pond
Credit: John Constable (1776-1837)
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Heath House, Hampstead
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Church Row, NW3 Church Row is an eighteenth-century residential street. Many of the properties are listed on the National Heritage List for England. The writer H. G. Wells bought No. 17 in 1909 and lived there with his wife, Jane. The comedian Peter Cook bought No. 17 for £24,000 in 1965. Cook and Dudley Moore wrote their Pete & Dud routines in the attic.
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Flask Walk, Hampstead (1922)
Credit: Charles Ginner (1878-1952)
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Holly Walk, NW3
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Removing the ’Dick Turpin House and Stables’ which once stood close to the Spaniards Inn, Hampstead, January 1934. The building caused an even narrower traffic obstruction than the pub still does today
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Spedan Close
Credit: municipaldreams.wordpress.com
Licence: CC BY 2.0




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