Battersea Bridge, SW11

Road in/near Battersea, existing between 1771 and now

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Road · Battersea · SW11 ·
JANUARY
7
2021
Battersea Bridge connects Battersea and Chelsea with the first bridge dating from 1771.

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The contract to build a new Battersea Bridge to replace its wooden predecessor was awarded to John Mowlem & Company.

In June 1887 the Duke of Clarence laid a ceremonial foundation stone in the southern abutment and construction work began. Joseph Bazalgette’s design incorporated five arches with cast iron griders, on granite piers which rested on concrete foundations. Construction work was overseen by Bazalgette’s son Edward, and cost a total of £143 000.

On 21 July 1890, the bridge was officially opened by future Prime Minister Lord Rosebery, then chairman of the newly formed London County Council. Unlike its predecessor, the new bridge was officially named Battersea Bridge. Although the road was narrow, trams operated on it from the outset.

Although the five spans of the current bridge are far wider than the nineteen spans of the original bridge, Battersea Bridge’s location on a sharp bend in the river still presents a hazard to navigation.


Main source: Wikipedia
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963’65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

Reply

LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Scott Hatton   
Added: 30 Jan 2023 11:28 GMT   

The Beatles on a London rooftop
The Beatles’ rooftop concert took place on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. It was their final public performance as a band and was unannounced, attracting a crowd of onlookers. The concert lasted for 42 minutes and included nine songs. The concert is remembered as a seminal moment in the history of rock music and remains one of the most famous rock performances of all time.

Reply

Michael Upham   
Added: 16 Jan 2023 21:16 GMT   

Bala Place, SE16
My grandfather was born at 2 Bala Place.

Reply

   
Added: 15 Jan 2023 09:49 GMT   

The Bombing of Nant Street WW2
My uncle with his young son and baby daughter were killed in the bombing of Nant Street in WW2. His wife had gone to be with her mother whilst the bombing of the area was taking place, and so survived. Cannot imagine how she felt when she returned to see her home flattened and to be told of the death of her husband and children.


Reply
Lived here
Brian J MacIntyre   
Added: 8 Jan 2023 17:27 GMT   

Malcolm Davey at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square
My former partner, actor Malcolm Davey, lived at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square, for many years until his death. He was a wonderful human being and an even better friend. A somewhat underrated actor, but loved by many, including myself. I miss you terribly, Malcolm. Here’s to you and to History, our favourite subject.
Love Always - Brian J MacIntyre
Minnesota, USA

Reply
Lived here
Robert Burns   
Added: 5 Jan 2023 17:46 GMT   

1 Abourne Street
My mother, and my Aunt and my Aunt’s family lived at number 1 Abourne Street.
I remember visitingn my aunt Win Housego, and the Housego family there. If I remember correctly virtually opposite number 1, onthe corner was the Lord Amberley pub.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 30 Dec 2022 21:41 GMT   

Southam Street, W10
do any one remember J&A DEMOLITON at harrow rd kensal green my dad work for them in a aec 6 wheel tipper got a photo of him in it

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 26 Dec 2022 18:59 GMT   

Detailed history of Red Lion
I’m not the author but this blog by Dick Weindling and Marianne Colloms has loads of really clear information about the history of the Red Lion which people might appreciate.


Source: ‘Professor Morris’ and the Red Lion, Kilburn

Reply

BG   
Added: 20 Dec 2022 02:58 GMT   

Lancing Street, NW1
LANCING STREET

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Cremorne Gardens Cremorne Gardens, with a vestige existing today, was in its prime between 1846 and 1877.
The Fascination of Chelsea The Fascination of Chelsea was a book published in 1902.
The Prince Albert Originally called the Albert Tavern, the Prince Albert public house is a three storey building dating from 1866-68.

NEARBY STREETS
Albany Mansions, SW11 Albany Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Albert Bridge House, SW11 Albert Bridge House is sited on Albert Bridge Road.
Albert Bridge Road, SW11 Albert Bridge Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Albion Riverside Building, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Albion Riverside, SW11 Albion Riverside is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Anchor House, SW10 Anchor House is sited on Moravian Place.
Anhalt Road, SW11 Anhalt Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Ann Lane, SW10 Ann Lane is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Apollo House, SW10 Apollo House is a block on Munro Terrace.
Ashburnham Tower, SW10 Ashburnham Tower is a block on Blantyre Street.
Battersea Bridge, SW3 Battersea Bridge, a five-span arch bridge with cast-iron girders and granite piers links Battersea south of the River Thames with Chelsea to the north.
Battersea Church Road, SW11 Battersea Church Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Beaufort Street, SW3 Beaufort Street was laid out in 1766 on the site of Beaufort House.
Berenger Tower, SW10 Berenger Tower is a block on Blantyre Street.
Blantyre Street, SW10 Blantyre Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Blantyre Tower, SW10 Blantyre Tower can be found on Cremorne Road.
Bolingbroke Walk, SW11 Bolingbroke Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Brunel House, SW10 Brunel House is located on Cheyne Walk.
Cadogan Pier, SW3 Cadogan Pier is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Carlyle’s House, SW3 Carlyle’s House is a block on Cheyne Row.
Chelsea Crescent, SW10 Chelsea Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Chelsea Farm House, SW10 Chelsea Farm House is a block on Milmans Street.
Chelsea Reach Tower, SW10 Chelsea Reach Tower can be found on Blantyre Street.
Chelsea Wharf, SW10 Chelsea Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Cheyne Mews, SW3 Cheyne Mews is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Cheyne Row, SW3 Cheyne Row is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Cheyne Walk, SW10 Cheyne Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Cheyne Walk, SW3 Cheyne Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Condray Place, SW11 Condray Place is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Cremorne Road, SW10 Cremorne Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Danvers Street, SW3 Sir John Danvers (died 1655) introduced Italian gardens to England in his mansion Danvers House whose grounds spread from the river to the Kings Road.
Dartrey Tower, SW10 Dartrey Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Dimson Court, SW11 Dimson Court is a block on Sunbury Lane.
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Elcho Street, SW11 Elcho Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Ethelburga Street, SW11 Ethelburga Street was named after Saint Æthelburh (Ethelburga), founder and first Abbess of Barking.
Gillray House, SW10 Gillray House is a block on Ann Lane.
Great Eastern Wharf, SW11 Great Eastern Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Henty Close, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
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Hobury Street, SW10 Hobury Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Howie Street, SW11 Howie Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Hyde Lane, SW11 Hyde Lane is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Juer Street, SW11 Juer Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Justice Walk, SW3 Justice Walk links Old Church Street and Lawrence Street.
Kingswater Place, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Lacland House, SW10 Lacland House is a block on Ann Lane.
Lamont Road, SW10 Lamont Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Lawrence Street, SW3 Lawrence Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Limerston Street, SW10 Limerston Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Lordship Place, SW3 This is a street in the SW3 postcode area
Maskelyne Close, SW11 Maskelyne Close is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Milman’s House, SW10 Milman’s House is a building on Milmans Street.
Milmans Street, SW10 Milmans Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Moravian Place, SW10 Moravian Place is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Park South, SW11 Park South is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Parkgate Road, SW11 Parkgate Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Paultons Square, SW3 Paultons Square, a garden square, was built in 1836–40 on the site of a former market garden.
Paultons Street, SW3 Paultons Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Paveley Drive, SW11 Paveley Drive is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Petyt Place, SW3 Petyt Place is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Pier House, SW3 Pier House is a block on Cheyne Walk.
Purcell House, SW10 Purcell House is a block on Milmans Street.
Queens House, SW3 Queens House is a block on Cheyne Walk.
Radstock Street, SW11 Radstock Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Rainsome Dock, SW11 Rainsome Dock is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Randall Close, SW11 Randall Close is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Ransomes Dock Business Centre, SW11 Ransomes Dock Business Centre is a block on Parkgate Road.
Ransomes Dock, SW11 Ransomes Dock is a development in Battersea.
Riley House, SW10 Riley House can be found on Riley Street.
Riley Street, SW10 Riley Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Riverside, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Rosenau Road, SW11 Rosenau Road was named after Schloss Rosenau, the birthplace and boyhood home of Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, who became the consort of Queen Victoria.
Searles Close, SW11 Searles Close is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Selworthy House, SW11 Selworthy House is a block on Battersea Church Road.
St Mary Le Park Court, SW11 St Mary Le Park Court is a block on Albert Bridge Road.
The Court House, SW3 The Court House is located on Justice Walk.
The Parkgate Road, SW11 The Parkgate Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Thorney Crescent, SW11 Thorney Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Waterfront Drive, SW10 Waterfront Drive is a location in London.
Westbridge Road, SW11 Westbridge Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Whistler Tower, SW10 Whistler Tower is a block on Edith Grove.
Whistlers Avenue, SW11 Whistlers Avenue is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Worfield Street, SW11 Worfield Street runs north from Rosenau Road towards Parkgate Road.
World’s End Passage, SW10 World’s End Passage is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Worlds End Place, SW10 Worlds End Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
The Prince Albert Originally called the Albert Tavern, the Prince Albert public house is a three storey building dating from 1866-68.


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We now have 549 completed street histories and 46951 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


Battersea

Battersea is an area of the London Borough of Wandsworth, England. It is an inner-city district on the south side of the River Thames.

Battersea covers quite a wide area - it spans from Fairfield in the west to Queenstown in the east. Battersea is mentioned in Anglo-Saxon times as Badrices ieg = Badric's Island.

Although in modern times it is known mostly for its wealth, Battersea remains characterised by economic inequality, with council estates being surrounded by more prosperous areas.

Battersea was an island settlement established in the river delta of the Falconbrook; a river that rises in Tooting Bec Common and flowed through south London to the River Thames.

As with many former Thames island settlements, Battersea was reclaimed by draining marshland and building culverts for streams.

Before the Industrial Revolution, much of the area was farmland, providing food for the City of London and surrounding population centres; and with particular specialisms, such as growing lavender on Lavender Hill, asparagus (sold as 'Battersea Bundles') or pig breeding on Pig Hill (later the site of the Shaftesbury Park Estate).

At the end of the 18th century, above 300 acres of land in the parish of Battersea were occupied by some 20 market gardeners, who rented from five to near 60 acres each.

Villages in the wider area - Battersea, Wandsworth, Earlsfield (hamlet of Garratt), Tooting, Balham - were isolated one from another; and throughout the second half of the second millennium, the wealthy built their country retreats in Battersea and neighbouring areas.

Industry developed eastwards along the bank of the Thames during the industrial revolution from 1750s onwards; the Thames provided water for transport, for steam engines and for water-intensive industrial processes. Bridges erected across the Thames encouraged growth; Battersea Bridge was built in 1771. Inland from the river, the rural agricultural community persisted.

Battersea was radically altered by the coming of railways. The London and Southampton Railway Company was the first to drive a railway line from east to west through Battersea, in 1838, terminating at Nine Elms at the north west tip of the area. Over the next 22 years five other lines were built, across which all trains from Waterloo Station and Victoria Station ran. An interchange station was built in 1863 towards the north west of the area, at a junction of the railway. Taking the name of a fashionable village a mile and more away, the station was named Clapham Junction.

During the latter decades of the nineteenth century Battersea had developed into a major town railway centre with two locomotive works at Nine Elms and Longhedge and three important motive power depots (Nine Elms, Stewarts Lane and Battersea) all situated within a relatively small area in the north of the district.

A population of 6000 people in 1840 was increased to 168 000 by 1910; and save for the green spaces of Battersea Park, Clapham Common, Wandsworth Common and some smaller isolated pockets, all other farmland was built over, with, from north to south, industrial buildings and vast railway sheds and sidings (much of which remain), slum housing for workers, especially north of the main east–west railway, and gradually more genteel residential terraced housing further south.

The railway station encouraged local government to site its buildings - the town hall, library, police station, court and post office in the area surrounding Clapham Junction.

All this building around the station marginalised Battersea High Street (the main street of the original village) into no more than an extension of Falcon Road.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens (1864) In the 17th century, Chelsea Farm was formed and the area was used for market gardening plots, supplying central London. In 1778, Lord Cremorne bought Chelsea Farm and Cremorne House was built. In 1830 Charles Random de Berenger, a colourful character implicated in financial fraud during the Napoleonic War, purchased Cremorne House. He was a keen sportsman and opened a sports club know as Cremorne Stadium for ‘skilful and manly exercise’ including shooting, sailing, archery and fencing. In 1846, De Berenger’s Cremorne Stadium was transformed into a pleasure garden which became a popular and noisy place of entertainment. The entertainment included a diverse range of activities including concerts, fireworks, balloon ascents, galas and theatre.
Credit: Phoebus Levin
TUM image id: 1526047056
Licence:
The Fascination of Chelsea
TUM image id: 1524258115
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Elm Park Gardens
TUM image id: 1573064988
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Badric Road, SW11 (1950s)
TUM image id: 1647278035
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Petworth Street sign
TUM image id: 1493989872
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Albert Bridge opened in 1873 and was immediately designated as a dangerous structure. It was noticed early on that vibrations could threaten the structural integrity of the bridge.
Credit: The Underground Map
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Battersea Bridge (1860s)
Credit: James Hedderly
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Fascination of Chelsea
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Elm Park Gardens
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Rosenau Road, SW11 Schloss Rosenau is a castle, formerly in Saxe-Coburg, now lying in Bavaria. Schloss Rosenau was the boyhood home of Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, who became the husband of Queen Victoria. Due to the name of nearby Albert Bridge, builders rook the opportunity to call many of the roads of this area of Battersea after connections with the Prince Consort.
Credit: The Underground Map
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Petworth Street sign
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Old Battersea Bridge, Walter Greaves (oil on canvas, 1874) Old Battersea Bridge, seen from upstream, on Lindsey Row (now Cheyne Walk), with Battersea on the far shore. The boatyard belonging to the Greaves family is in the foreground. On the extreme left is the wall surrounding the garden of the artist William Bell Scott. In the far distance Crystal Palace is just visible. Battersea Bridge was demolished in 1881, and replaced with the present bridge. Before the alterations Greaves recalled the danger to shipping and the difficulty of steering through the arches unless the ‘set of the tide was known’.
Credit: Tate Gallery
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Justice Walk links Old Church Street and Lawrence Street. It has stayed relatively untouched, a reminder of early 19th century Chelsea. The cellar under the Wesleyan Chapel, seen on the right, was used as a soup kitchen for the poor. The chapel was relocated to the corner of Chelsea Manor Street and King’s Road circa 1900. H. Allen Smith, wine merchants, occupied the premise from 1903 to 1985. According to local legend, a courthouse with a gaol beneath occupied this site in 18th century. Prisoners were led through a tunnel to boats moored on the river to be transported to Australia.
Credit: William Walter Burgess c.1890
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Albert Bridge Road at the former end of Ethelburga Street (1958)
Credit: Gwyneth Wexler
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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