Lynedoch Street, E2

Road, existed between 1861 and 1938

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Road · * · E2 ·
August
30
2020
Lynedoch Street used to lie behind the Shoreditch Workhouse.

Before an 1890s renaming this used to be Mary Street and connected Hoxton Steet with Kingsland Road.

The street came into existence when the new Shoreditch Workhouse was built in the 1860s.

In 1774, the authorities in Shoreditch raised money for a new workhouse. It was erected on a site known as the ’Land of Promise’ and the three-storey building including an infirmary and apothecary opened in 1777 with its main entrance on Kingsland Road. In 1784, a burial ground was consecrated at its southwest corner. The labour of the inmates was sold locally.

In 1813, James Parkinson was appointed as surgeon and apothecary. He established a separate fever block in the workhouse, which was the first in London. In 1817 he published an ’Essay on the Shaking Palsy’ in which he described the condition now known as Parkinson’s Disease.

In 1847, a Parliamentary sub-committee found the workhouse to be overcrowded. In 1849, the Trustees responded with a major modernisation.

A local Act in 1858 replaced the Trustees by a new body - the Board of Guardians of the Poor. In 1861, the Guardians set aside £47,750 to construct a new workhouse for 1200 inmates. Work on building began in 1863 and was completed in 1866.

At the same time, the workhouse land was reconfigured allowing for new streets to be constructed to the south, including Mary Street.

At the turn of the twentieth century, Mary Street was retitled Lynedoch Street, and otherwise Lynedock Street. As part of a redevelopment, the street went under the bulldozer in 1938.




Main source: The Workhouse in Shoreditch (St Leonard’s), London: Middlesex
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Danny Newman   

Wordpress comment (September 5, 2021)
My dad recalls Lynedoch Street as a rubble site and a wilderness gated at both ends with just the shells of the houses which he and his mates used to play in in the 1950's.
This comment was posted on The Underground Map blog. Clicking the link will take you to the blog page

STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

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Comment
Marion James   
Added: 12 Mar 2021 17:43 GMT   

26 Edith Street Haggerston
On Monday 11th October 1880 Charlotte Alice Haynes was born at 26 Edith Street Haggerston the home address of her parents her father Francis Haynes a Gilder by trade and her mother Charlotte Alice Haynes and her two older siblings Francis & George who all welcomed the new born baby girl into the world as they lived in part of the small Victorian terraced house which was shared by another family had an outlook view onto the world of the Imperial Gas Works site - a very grey drab reality of the life they were living as an East End working class family - 26 Edith Street no longer stands in 2021 - the small rundown polluted terrace houses of Edith Street are long since gone along with the Gas Companies buildings to be replaced with green open parkland that is popular in 21st century by the trendy residents of today - Charlotte Alice Haynes (1880-1973) is the wife of my Great Grand Uncle Henry Pickett (1878-1930) As I research my family history I slowly begin to understand the life my descendants had to live and the hardships that they went through to survive - London is my home and there are many areas of this great city I find many of my descendants living working and dying in - I am yet to find the golden chalice! But in all truthfulness my family history is so much more than hobby its an understanding of who I am as I gather their stories. Did Charlotte Alice Pickett nee Haynes go on to live a wonderful life - no I do not think so as she became a widow in 1930 worked in a canteen and never remarried living her life in and around Haggerston & Hackney until her death in 1973 with her final resting place at Manor Park Cemetery - I think Charlotte most likely excepted her lot in life like many women from her day, having been born in the Victorian era where the woman had less choice and standing in society, which is a sad state of affairs - So I will endeavour to write about Charlotte and the many other women in my family history to give them the voice of a life they so richly deserve to be recorded !

Edith Street was well situated for the new public transport of two railway stations in 1880 :- Haggerston Railway Station opened in 1867 & Cambridge Heath Railway Station opened in 1872


Reply
Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

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Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

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Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

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Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

Reply

Sir Walter Besant   
Added: 11 Nov 2021 18:47 GMT   

Sir Walter adds....
All the ground facing Wirtemberg Street at Chip and Cross Streets is being levelled for building and the old houses are disappearing fast. The small streets leading through into little Manor Street are very clean and tenanted by poor though respectable people, but little Manor Street is dirty, small, and narrow. Manor Street to Larkhall Rise is a wide fairly clean thoroughfare of mixed shops and houses which improves towards the north. The same may be said of Wirtemberg Street, which commences poorly, but from the Board School north is far better than at the Clapham end.

Source: London: South of the Thames - Chapter XX by Sir Walter Besant (1912)

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

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Comment
tom   
Added: 3 Nov 2021 05:16 GMT   

I met
someone here 6 years ago

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Comment
Fion Anderson   
Added: 2 Nov 2021 12:55 GMT   

Elstree not Borehamwood
Home of the UK film industry

Reply
Lived here
roger morris   
Added: 16 Oct 2021 08:50 GMT   

Atherton Road, IG5 (1958 - 1980)
I moved to Atherton road in 1958 until 1980 from Finsbury Park. My father purchased the house from his brother Sydney Morris. My father continued to live there until his death in 1997, my mother having died in 1988.
I attended The Glade Primary School in Atherton Road from sept 1958 until 1964 when I went to Beal School. Have fond memories of the area and friends who lived at no2 (Michael Clark)and no11 (Brian Skelly)

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Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 190005, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Crondall Street
TUM image id: 1575830074
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The Crown public house.
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Ely Place dates from the 1860s but the name dates from 1669. On 11 November 1651, property owner Thomas Robinson sold a portion of his land to one Francis Kirkman. It was described as a "parcel of ground 34 feet wide and from 74 to 84 feet long (...) and the entry way from Hoxton Street between the houses, and a garden plot of one acre extending eastwards to Kingsland Highway". In 1665, the Joiners Company purchased an estate at Hoxton and in 1669, sold it on to the overseers of the poor of the Liberty of Saffron Hill, Hatton Garden and Ely Rents. This forms the basis for Ely Place and the land to its north (part of which was developed into the Shoreditch Workhouse). Obliterated during Second World War bombing, 1974 saw an area including Lynedoch Street and Ely Place redeveloped.
TUM image id: 1599820206
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In the neighbourhood...

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Geffrye Museum, London (2012)
Credit: Chang Yisheng
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Crondall Street
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Traffic scene at Shoreditch on the Kingsland Road (1929)
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Ely Place dates from the 1860s but the name dates from 1669. On 11 November 1651, property owner Thomas Robinson sold a portion of his land to one Francis Kirkman. It was described as a "parcel of ground 34 feet wide and from 74 to 84 feet long (...) and the entry way from Hoxton Street between the houses, and a garden plot of one acre extending eastwards to Kingsland Highway". In 1665, the Joiners Company purchased an estate at Hoxton and in 1669, sold it on to the overseers of the poor of the Liberty of Saffron Hill, Hatton Garden and Ely Rents. This forms the basis for Ely Place and the land to its north (part of which was developed into the Shoreditch Workhouse). Obliterated during Second World War bombing, 1974 saw an area including Lynedoch Street and Ely Place redeveloped.
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Colville Estate, Shoreditch (2019) The Colville Estate is situated between the Regents Canal to the North and Shoreditch Park to the South. It was designed in the early 1950s by Shoreditch Metropolitan Borough Council and since 2009 has undergone regeneration.
Credit: Municipal Dreams
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Looking down Bookham Street from the New North Road. (1956)
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The original Shoreditch Workhouse, situated on the Land of Promise.
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