Old Spitalfields Market

Market in/near Spitalfields, existing between 1682 and now.

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Market · * · E1 ·
JANUARY
6
2022
Old Spitalfields Market is a covered market which has been on the site since the 17th century.

There has been a market here since 1638 when King Charles I gave a licence for food to be sold on the Spittle Fields - then a rural area on the eastern outskirts of London. The rights to the market lapsed during the time of the Commonwealth but the market was re-established in 1682 by King Charles II.

Market buildings were sited on a rectangular patch of ground bounded by (the later) Crispin Street to the west, Lamb Street to the north, Red Lion Street (Commercial Street) to the east and Paternoster Row (later Brushfield Street) to the south. The existing buildings were constructed between 1885 and 1893 to the designs of George Sherrin and commissioned by Robert Horner, the last private owner of the market.

The market was acquired by the City of London Corporation in 1920. Spitalfields Market was extended west to Steward Street in 1926, destroying the northern sections of Crispin Street and Gun Street.

In 1991 the wholesale fruit and vegetable market moved to New Spitalfields Market in Leyton. This original site became known as Old Spitalfields Market. Market stalls were redesigned by architects Foster and Partners for Old Spitalfields Market in October 2017.

Since 2005, there has been a (newer) market now called Spitalfields Market immediately to its west. Between the two, a range of markets runs daily with independent local stores and restaurants.

The Victorian buildings and the market hall and roof have been restored and Spitalfields is now one of London’s major markets.


Main source: Wikipedia
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
Christine D Elliott   
Added: 11 Jun 2023 14:50 GMT   

Spitalfields
Charles Blutte came to Spitalfields from Walincourt, Picardie, France for reason of religious persecution. His brother Pierre Phillippe Blutte followed the following year. Between the two brothers they had eventually 20 children, they worked as silk weavers around the Brick Lane area. Member’s of Pierre’s family resided at 40 Thomas Street for over 100 years. Another residence associated with the Blutte family is Vine Court, Lamb Street, Spitalfields, number 16,17 & 18 Vine Court was owned by John Kindon, the father in law of Charles Blutte’s son Jean (John) who married Ann Kindon. This residence appears several times in the census records.

Source: Quarto_52_Vol_LII_La_Providence

Reply
Comment
Theresa Penney   
Added: 16 Apr 2024 18:08 GMT   

1 Whites Row
My 2 x great grandparents and his family lived here according to the 1841 census. They were Dutch Ashkenazi Jews born in Amsterdam at the beginning of the 19th century but all their children were born in Spitalfields.

Reply
Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

Reply
Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
   
Added: 2 May 2024 16:14 GMT   

Farm Place, W8
The previous name of Farm Place was Ernest St (no A)

Reply
Comment
Tony Whipple   
Added: 16 Apr 2024 21:35 GMT   

Frank Whipple Place, E14
Frank was my great-uncle, I’d often be ’babysat’ by Peggy while Nan and Dad went to the pub. Peggy was a marvel, so full of life. My Dad and Frank didn’t agree on most politics but everyone in the family is proud of him. A genuinely nice, knowledgable bloke. One of a kind.

Reply
Comment
Theresa Penney   
Added: 16 Apr 2024 18:08 GMT   

1 Whites Row
My 2 x great grandparents and his family lived here according to the 1841 census. They were Dutch Ashkenazi Jews born in Amsterdam at the beginning of the 19th century but all their children were born in Spitalfields.

Reply
Comment
Wendy    
Added: 22 Mar 2024 15:33 GMT   

Polygon Buildings
Following the demolition of the Polygon, and prior to the construction of Oakshott Court in 1974, 4 tenement type blocks of flats were built on the site at Clarendon Sq/Phoenix Rd called Polygon Buildings. These were primarily for people working for the Midland Railway and subsequently British Rail. My family lived for 5 years in Block C in the 1950s. It seems that very few photos exist of these buildings.

Reply

Steve   
Added: 19 Mar 2024 08:42 GMT   

Road construction and houses completed
New Charleville Circus road layout shown on Stanford’s Library Map Of London And Its Suburbs 1879 with access via West Hill only.

Plans showing street numbering were recorded in 1888 so we can concluded the houses in Charleville Circus were built by this date.

Source: Charleville Circus, Sydenham, London

Reply
Comment
Steve   
Added: 19 Mar 2024 08:04 GMT   

Charleville Circus, Sydenham: One Place Study (OPS)
One Place Study’s (OPS) are a recent innovation to research and record historical facts/events/people focused on a single place �’ building, street, town etc.

I have created an open access OPS of Charleville Circus on WikiTree that has over a million members across the globe working on a single family tree for everyone to enjoy, for free, forever.

Source: Charleville Circus, Sydenham, London

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Comment
Charles   
Added: 8 Mar 2024 20:45 GMT   

My House
I want to know who lived in my house in the 1860’s.

Reply

NH   
Added: 7 Mar 2024 11:41 GMT   

Telephone House
Donald Hunter House, formerly Telephone House, was the BT Offices closed in 2000

Reply



LOCAL PHOTOS
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Byward Tower, 1893
TUM image id: 1556882285
Licence: CC BY 2.0

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Credit: Wellcome Images
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Licence: CC BY 2.0


St Katherine Cree, City of London St Katharine Cree is a Church of England church on the north side of Leadenhall Street near Leadenhall Market. The present church was built in 1628–30, retaining the Tudor tower of its predecessor. The church escaped the Great Fire of London in 1666 and suffered only minor damage in the London Blitz.
Credit: Prioryman
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St James Duke’s Place The church survived the Great Fire of London, but fell into disrepair and was rebuilt in 1727, retaining much of the original woodwork. The poverty of the Aldgate area made it increasingly difficult to raise funds to maintain the church; Godwin described it as being "in a very dirty and dilapidated state". In 1874, under the 1860 Union of Benefices Act, it was demolished and the parish joined to that of St Katherine Cree. The site of the church is now occupied by the Sir John Cass School.
Credit: Robert William Billings and John Le Keux
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The Third Goodmans Fields Theatre, Great Alie Street (1801)
Credit: W. W. Hutchings
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Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov (Lenin) addressing a "smoking debate" at Toynbee Hall (1902)
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Petticoat Lane in the 1920s
Credit: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress)
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The Whitechapel Gallery was designed by Charles Harrison Townsend and opened in 1901. It was one of the first publicly funded galleries in London. The gallery exhibited Pablo Picasso’s Guernica in 1938 as part of a touring exhibition organised by Roland Penrose to protest against the Spanish Civil War. Initiated by members of the Independent Group, the gallery brought Pop Art to the attention of the general public as well as introducing some of the artists, concepts, designers and photographers that would define the Swinging Sixties.
Credit: LeHaye/Wiki Commons
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