The Three Magpies

Pub/bar in/near Heathrow, existing between the 1700s and now

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(51.48108 -0.45086, 51.481 -0.45) 
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Pub/bar · Heathrow · TW6 ·
December
14
2018
The Three Magpies is the last pub left on the Bath Road.

There has been a pub on this site since the 16th century and was rebuilt in the nineteenth century.

It was already named - as the Three Pigeons in 1765.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
   
Added: 30 May 2022 19:03 GMT   

The Three Magpies
Row of houses (centre) was on Heathrow Rd....Ben’s Cafe shack ( foreground ) and the Three Magpies pub (far right) were on the Bath Rd

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Lived here
   
Added: 19 Feb 2022 16:21 GMT   

Harmondsworth (1939 - 1965)
I lived in a house (Lostwithiel) on the Bath Road opposite the junction with Tythe Barn Lane, now a hotel site. Initially, aircraft used one of the diagonal runways directly in line with our house. I attended Sipson Primary School opposite the Three Magpies and celebrated my 21st birthday at The Peggy Bedford in 1959.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Alison   
Added: 26 Jun 2022 18:20 GMT   

On the dole in north London
When I worked at the dole office in Medina Road in the 1980s, "Archway" meant the social security offices which were in Archway Tower at the top of the Holloway Road. By all accounts it was a nightmare location for staff and claimants alike. This was when Margaret Thatcher’s government forced unemployment to rise to over 3 million (to keep wages down) and computerised records where still a thing of the future. Our job went from ensuring that unemployed people got the right sort and amount of benefits at the right time, to stopping as many people as possible from getting any sort of benefit at all. Britain changed irrevocably during this period and has never really recovered. We lost the "all in it together" frame of mind that had been born during the second world war and became the dog-eat-dog society where 1% have 95% of the wealth and many people can’t afford to feed their children. For me, the word Archway symbolises the land of lost content.

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Comment
Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

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Lived here
   
Added: 19 Jun 2022 16:58 GMT   

Runcorn Place, W11
Runcorn place

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Comment
Watts   
Added: 17 May 2022 20:29 GMT   

Baeethoven St School, also an Annex for Paddington College of FE.
In the early 70’s I took a two year science course at Paddington CFE. The science classes were held on weekday evenings at Beethoven Street school, overseen by chemistry teacher, Mr Tattershall.

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Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Brian Lynch   
Added: 10 Apr 2022 13:38 GMT   

Staples Mattress Factory
An architect’s design of the Staples Mattress Factory
An image found on the website of Dalzell’s Beds, in Armagh Northern Ireland.

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Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

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NEARBY STREETS
Blunts Avenue, UB7 Blunts Avenue is one of the streets of London in the UB7 postal area.
Boltons Lane, UB3 Boltons Lane is one of the streets of London in the UB3 postal area.
Bomer Close, UB7 Bomer Close is a cul-de-sac off Ashby Way.
Chestnut Close, UB7 Chestnut Close lies off of Doghurst Drive.
Doghurst Avenue, UB3 Doghurst Avenue is a road in the UB3 postcode area
Doghurst Cottages, TW6 Doghurst Cottages were situated at the east side of the north end of Heathrow Road.
Doghurst Drive, UB7 Doghurst Drive is a road in the UB7 postcode area
Egerton Way, UB3 Egerton Way is a road in the UB3 postcode area
Heathrow Road, TW6 Heathrow Road is now buried beneath the runways and terminal buildings of Heathrow Airport.
Mondial Way, UB3 Mondial Way is one of the streets of London in the UB3 postal area.
Nene Road, TW6 Nene Road connects Bath Road and the Northern Perimeter Road.
Nettleton Road, UB3 Nettleton Road largely runs parallel with the Bath Road in the northern part of the Heathrow Airport area.
Northern Perimeter Road West, TW6 Northern Perimeter Road West is part of a series of roads running along the perimeters of Heathrow Airport.
Raywood Close, UB3 Raywood Close is a road in the UB3 postcode area
Sipson Way, UB7 Sipson Way is one of the streets of London in the UB7 postal area.
Sovereign Court, UB3 Sovereign Court is a road in the UB7 postcode area
Strata House, UB3 Strata House is a block along Bath Road.
Tasker Close, UB3 Tasker Close is a road in the UB3 postcode area
Two modern houses, TW6 Two modern houses, west side. In the 1930s, Mr Ward (headmaster at Harmondsworth school) lived there.

NEARBY PUBS
Old Magpies The Old Magpies was a pub which was situated on the Bath Road.


Heathrow

Heathrow Airport itself began in 1944 - its underground station opened in 1977.

Heathrow Central station opened on 16 December 1977 as the final terminus of the Piccadilly line’s extension from Hounslow West to Heathrow Airport. The preceding station on the line - Hatton Cross - had opened as a temporary terminus in 1975.

At its opening, Heathrow Central station served as the terminus of what then became known as the Heathrow branch of the line. Previously the branch had been called the Hounslow branch. 1977 was the first time that an airport had been directly served by an underground railway system.

With the development of the airport’s Terminal 4, this station renamed Heathrow Terminals 1, 2, 3 on 6 October 1986. With the closure of Terminal 1, a new renaming occurred.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Click here to see map view of nearby Creative Commons images
Click here to see Creative Commons images near to this postcode
Heathrow Hall, 1935.
TUM image id: 1503231819
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Perrott’s Farm
TUM image id: 1503239496
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Three Magpies pub on the Bath Road near Heathrow Airport. Almost opposite the Three Magpies was St Saviour’s Church opened in 1880 - later the site of the Heathrow Park Hotel.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Old Magpies was an old pub on the Bath Road near Heathrow, demolished in 1951.
Licence:


Orchards were a major agricultural activities in the Heathrow area before the building of the airport in 1944.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Rehemtulla
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Three Magpies, Bath Road, Heathrow can be seen on the far right. The buildings here were on Heathrow Road - which was buried under the airport runways.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Heathrow Hall, 1935.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Doghurst Cottages and the entrance to Heathrow Road behind the Three Magpies pub, Bath Road (1944)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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