Unknown as yet

Pub in/near Walworth, existed between 1822 and 2004

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  ·  MAPS  ·  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.49251 -0.08375, 51.492 -0.083) 
MAP YEAR:175018001810182018301860190019502022Show map without markers
ZOOM:14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 18 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 18
TIP: Adjust the MAP YEAR and ZOOM to tweak historical maps
Pub · Walworth · NW6 ·
MAY
10
2021
The Swan stood at 84 Old Kent Road.

xx
William Hawkes was listed as victualler in 1822 though the hostelry dates back further.

The Swan underwent many name changes latr in its career as a pub including Gooseberries, The White Swan, Caesar’s and finally Uncle Sam’s until closure and demolition in 2004


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 521 completed street histories and 46979 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

Reply

Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

Reply
Comment
Johna216   
Added: 9 Aug 2017 16:26 GMT   

Thanks!
I have recently started a web site, the info you provide on this site has helped me greatly. Thank you for all of your time & work. There can be no real freedom without the freedom to fail. by Erich Fromm. eeggefeceefb

Reply
Lived here
KJ   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 12:34 GMT   

Family
1900’s Cranmer family lived here at 105 (changed to 185 when road was re-numbered)
James Cranmer wife Louisa ( b.Logan)
They had 3 children one being my grandparent William (Bill) CRANMER married to grandmother “Nancy” He used to go to
Glengall Tavern in Bird in Bush Rd ,now been converted to flats.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

Reply
Comment
Added: 6 Jul 2021 05:38 GMT   

Wren Road in the 1950s and 60s
Living in Grove Lane I knew Wren Road; my grandfather’s bank, Lloyds, was on the corner; the Scout District had their office in the Congregational Church and the entrance to the back of the Police station with the stables and horses was off it. Now very changed - smile.

Reply

   
Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

Reply
Reply
Jonathan Cocking   
Added: 30 Aug 2022 13:38 GMT   

Tower Bridge, SE1
The driver subsequently married his clippie (conductress).

Reply

LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:39 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

Reply
Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:38 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

Reply
Lived here
Phil Stubbington   
Added: 14 Nov 2022 16:28 GMT   

Numbers 60 to 70 (1901 - 1939)
A builder, Robert Maeers (1842-1919), applied to build six houses on plots 134 to 139 on the Lincoln House Estate on 5 October 1901. He received approval on 8 October 1901. These would become numbers 60 to 70 Rodenhurst Road (60 is plot 139). Robert Maeers was born in Northleigh, Devon. In 1901 he was living in 118 Elms Road with his wife Georgina, nee Bagwell. They had four children, Allan, Edwin, Alice, and Harriet, born between 1863 and 1873.
Alice Maeers was married to John Rawlins. Harriet Maeers was married to William Street.
Three of the six houses first appear on the electoral register in 1904:
Daniel Mescal “Ferncroft”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By the 1905 electoral register all six are occupied:

Daniel Mescal “St Senans”
Henry Robert Honeywood “Grasmere”
John Rawlins “Iveydene”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Walter Ernest Manning “St Hilda”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By 1906 house numbers replace names:

Daniel Mescal 70
Henry Robert Honeywood 68
John Rawlins 66
William Francis Street 64
Walter Ernest Manning 62
Henry Elkin 60

It’s not clear whether number 70 changed from “Ferncroft” to “St Senans” or possibly Daniel Mescal moved houses.

In any event, it can be seen that Robert Maeers’ two daughters are living in numbers 64 and 66, with, according to local information, an interconnecting door. In the 1911 census William Street is shown as a banker’s clerk. John Rawlins is a chartering clerk in shipping. Robert Maeers and his wife are also living at this address, Robert being shown as a retired builder.

By 1939 all the houses are in different ownership except number 60, where the Elkins are still in residence.


Reply
Comment
stephen garraway   
Added: 13 Nov 2022 13:56 GMT   

Martin Street, Latimer Road
I was born at St Charlottes and lived at 14, Martin Street, Latimer Road W10 until I was 4 years old when we moved to the east end. It was my Nan Grant’s House and she was the widow of George Frederick Grant. She had two sons, George and Frederick, and one daughter, my mother Margaret Patricia.
The downstairs flat where we lived had two floors, the basement and the ground floor. The upper two floors were rented to a Scot and his family, the Smiths. He had red hair. The lights and cooker were gas and there was one cold tap over a Belfast sink. A tin bath hung on the wall. The toilet was outside in the yard. This was concreted over and faced the the rear of the opposite terraces. All the yards were segregated by high brick walls. The basement had the a "best" room with a large , dark fireplace with two painted metal Alsation ornaments and it was very dark, cold and little used.
The street lights were gas and a man came round twice daily to turn them on and off using a large pole with a hook and a lighted torch on the end. I remember men coming round the streets with carts selling hot chestnuts and muffins and also the hurdy gurdy man with his instrument and a monkey in a red jacket. I also remember the first time I saw a black man and my mother pulling me away from him. He had a Trilby and pale Mackintosh so he must of been one of the first of the Windrush people. I seem to recall he had a thin moustache.
Uncle George had a small delivery lorry but mum lost touch with him and his family. Uncle Fred went to Peabody Buildings near ST.Pauls.
My Nan was moved to a maisonette in White City around 1966, and couldn’t cope with electric lights, cookers and heating and she lost all of her neighbourhood friends. Within six months she had extreme dementia and died in a horrible ward in Tooting Bec hospital a year or so later. An awful way to end her life, being moved out of her lifelong neighbourhood even though it was slums.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 31 Oct 2022 18:47 GMT   

Memories
I lived at 7 Conder Street in a prefab from roughly 1965 to 1971 approx - happy memories- sad to see it is no more ?

Reply

Eve Glover   
Added: 22 Oct 2022 09:28 GMT   

Shenley Road
Shenley Road is the main street in Borehamwood where the Job Centre and Blue Arrow were located

Reply
Comment
Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

Reply
Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

Reply

NEARBY STREETS
Aberdour Street, SE1 Aberdour Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Aldbridge Street, SE17 A street within the SE17 postcode
Alice Street, SE1 Alice Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Alscot Way, SE1 Alscot Way is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bacon Grove, SE1 Bacon Grove is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Balfour Street, SE17 Balfour Street is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Barlow Street, SE17 Barlow Street is one of the streets of London in the SE17 postal area.
Bartholomew Street, SE1 Bartholomew Street’s set of late Georgian houses date from 1819.
Baytree Mews, SE1 A street within the SE17 postcode
Beckway Street, SE17 Beckway Street is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Bricklayers Arms Flyover, SE1 Bricklayers Arms Flyover is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Burbage Close, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Burge Street, SE1 Burge Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Bushbaby Close, SE1 Bushbaby Close is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Cardinal Bourne Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Catesby Street, SE17 Catesby Street is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Chatham Street, SE17 Chatham Street is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Christmas Street, SE1 Christmas Street ran north from Tower Bridge Road, west of Green Walk.
Comus Place, SE17 Comus Place is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Congreve Street, SE17 Congreve Street is one of the streets of London in the SE17 postal area.
Crail Row, SE17 Crail Row is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Crimscott Street, SE1 Crimscott Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Crosslet Street, SE17 Crosslet Street is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Curtis Street, SE1 Curtis Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Curtis Way, SE1 Curtis Way is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Darwin Street, SE17 Darwin Street is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Dawes House, SE17 Dawes House can be found on Rodney Road
Dawes Street, SE17 James Arthur Dawes was the first Mayor of the Metropolitan Borough of Southwark.
Dean’s Buildings, SE17 Dean’s Buildings is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Deverell Street, SE1 Deverell Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
East Street, SE17 East Street, famous for its market, is likely to have been the birthplace of Charlie Chaplin, although no birth certificate exists.
Elsted Street, SE17 Elsted Street is one of the streets of London in the SE17 postal area.
Exon Street, SE17 A street within the SE17 postcode
Flint Street, SE17 Flint Street is one of the streets of London in the SE17 postal area.
Flinton Street, SE17 Flinton Street is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Freemantle Street, SE17 Freemantle Street is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Futura House, SE1 Futura House is a location in London.
Grange Road, SE1 Grange Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Grange Walk Mews, SE1 Grange Walk Mews is a location in London.
Grange Walk, SE1 Grange Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Grange Yard, SE1 Grange Yard is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Green Walk, SE1 Green Walk was originally one of two Green Walks in Southwark, the other being in Bankside.
Guinness Square, SE1 Guinness Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Hadlow House, SE17 Residential block
Halpin Place, SE17 A street within the SE17 postcode
Hemp Walk, SE17 A street within the SE17 postcode
Hendre Road, SE1 Hendre Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Henshaw Street, SE17 Henshaw Street is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Hillery Close, SE17 Hillery Close is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Hunter Close, SE1 Hunter Close is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Huntsman Street, SE17 A street within the SE17 postcode
John Maurice Close, SE17 John Maurice Close is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Kennedy Walk, SE17 A street within the SE17 postcode
Kingsley Flats, SE1 A street within the postcode
Leroy Street, SE1 Leroy Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Madron Street, SE1 Madron Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Madron Street, SE17 Madron Street is one of the streets of London in the SE17 postal area.
Mandela Way, SE1 Mandela Way is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Mandela Way, SE1 Mandela Way is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Mansfield Point, SE17 Mansfield Point is a location in London.
Marcia Road, SE1 Marcia Road is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Marnock House, SE17 Marnock House is a block on Brandon Street
Mason Close, SE1 Mason Close is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Mason Street, SE1 Mason Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Mason Street, SE17 A street within the SE17 postcode
Massinger Street, SE17 Massinger Street is one of the streets of London in the SE17 postal area.
Merrow Walk, SE17 Merrow Walk is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Mina Road, SE1 Mina Road is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Minnow Walk, SE17 Minnow Walk is a road in the SE17 postcode area
New Kent Road, SE1 New Kent Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
New Paragon Walk, SE17 New Paragon Walk is a location in London.
Newington Court, SE1 Newington Court is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Northchurch, SE17 A street within the SE17 postcode
Orb Street, SE17 Orb Street is a road in the SE17 postcode area
O’Reilly Street, SE1 O’Reilly Street runs off Willow Walk.
Pages Walk, SE1 Pages Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Penry Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Potier Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Preston Close, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Prioress Street, SE1 Prioress Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Quadrangle Close, SE1 Quadrangle Close is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Rephidim Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Rodney Road, SE17 Rodney Road is one of the streets of London in the SE17 postal area.
Salisbury Close, SE17 Salisbury Close is a location in London.
Searles Road, SE17 Searles Road is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Sedan Way, SE17 Sedan Way is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Setchell Way, SE1 Setchell Way is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Shopping Centre, SE1 Shopping Centre is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Sovereign House, SE1P A street within the SE1 postcode
St Mary Newington Close, SE17 St Mary Newington Close is a retirement development of 42 flats.
Stanford Place, SE17 Stanford Place is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Stead Street, SE17 Stead Street is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Surrey Square, SE17 Surrey Square was built in 1793-4 by Michael Searles.
Surrey Terrace, SE17 A street within the SE17 postcode
Swan Mead, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Tatum Street, SE17 Tatum Street is one of the streets of London in the SE17 postal area.
The Grange, SE1 The Grange is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
The School House, SE1 Residential block
The Willows, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Theobald Street, SE1 Theobald Street is (now) a short street lying off of the New Kent Road.
Tisdall Place, SE17 Tisdall Place is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Townsend Street, SE17 Townsend Street is one of the streets of London in the SE17 postal area.
Tyler Court, SE17 Tyler Court is a block on Balfour Street
Wadding Street, SE17 Wadding Street is a road in the SE17 postcode area
Webb Street, SE1 Webb Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Willow Walk, SE1 Willow Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Wood’s Place, SE1 Wood’s Place is a road in the SE1 postcode area

NEARBY PUBS
Dun Cow The Dun Cow stood at 279 Old Kent Road.
Unknown as yet The Victoria is a pub on Page’s Walk.


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 521 completed street histories and 46979 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


Walworth

Walworth is an inner-city district in the London Borough of Southwark. Walworth probably derives its name from the Old English Wealhworth, meaning 'farm'. It is located 2 miles south east of Charing Cross and near to Camberwell and Elephant and Castle.

The major streets in Walworth are the Old Kent Road and Walworth Road. It once had a common surrounded by streets with houses on one side, the Common on the other. This whole area is now covered by housing.

St. Peter's Church, Walworth's altar
St. Peter's Church, Walworth, built circa 1825, is an excellent example of the neo-classical style of church built by Sir John Soane. It is an indication of the wealth of the middle-class merchants who then lived in the vicinity that they could afford an architect of such prominence. Charles Upfold was born at Walworth Common and baptised at St. Peters. The church is home to the Monkey Park - which was once home to a menagerie kept by a past Reverend of the Church, but is now a garden.

Walworth is also home to the Pullens buildings - a mixture of Victorian live/work spaces and yards. Many of the flats are 1 bedroom, and some of the flats still connect to the Workshops of any of the three yards (Illife Yard, Peacock Yard and one other). They all share communal roof terraces with extensive views over to the West End.
Walworth also used to have a Zoo, in Royal Surrey Gardens, which was visited by Queen Victoria.

East Street market is a major street market.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Click here to see map view of nearby Creative Commons images
Click here to see Creative Commons images near to this postcode
Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
TUM image id: 1557142131
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Weston Street, SE1 (1950s)
TUM image id: 1644253864
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Wild’s Rents, SE1 (1930s)
TUM image id: 1644256555
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Villa Street Walworth c.1907.
TUM image id: 1604223727
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
East Street, Walworth is likely to have been the birthplace of Charlie Chaplin, although no birth certificate exists. It could therefore also have been the inspiration for his similarly named 1917 seminal short film Easy Street, a suggestion made as early as 1928 in the film ’The Life Story of Charlie Chaplin’ by Harry B. Parkinson. The famous trousers and boots of Chaplin’s trademark tramp costume may have been inspired by the every-day clothes Chaplin saw worn in what he called East Lane market. East Street Market also features in the title sequence to the television programme Only Fools and Horses.
Credit: Wiki Commons
Licence: CC BY 2.0


View across roof tops to Pink’s Factory, Tabard Street, Southwark (1916) This picture was taken prior to slum clearance to make way for the Tabard Garden Estate.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Tower Bridge (2021) Sometimes, during the various lockdowns, various normally-busy roads have been photogenically quiet
Credit: Instagram user
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Wild’s Rents, SE1 (1930s)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Slum housing, 24-37 Chapel Place, Southwark Chapel Place was a side turning off of Long Lane. The modern Hankey Place largely replaced it.
Credit: London Metropolitan Archives
Licence:


The corner of Long Lane with Staple Street, Bermondsey possibly at the end of the Boer War. In the 1950s these shops were Fordham’s and Leatherdales bakery. Later still there was a fish and chip shop here opposite the Valentine pub.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Villa Street Walworth c.1907.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Two young children watching others play outside in Christmas Street, SE1 on 21 December 1946. The buildings in the image are Clifton Buildings - four-storey tenements accessible via open stairwells which were classified as a slum and then condemned to be demolished to built the new Haddonhall Estate.
Credit: Charles Hewitt
Licence:


The Dun Cow at 279 Old Kent Road.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Print-friendly version of this page

  Contact us · Copyright policy · Privacy policy