Edenbridge Close, SE16

Road in/near Bermondsey

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  OPENSTREETMAP  GOOGLE MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.48665 -0.06093, 51.486 -0.06) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · Bermondsey · SE16 ·
APRIL
9
2019
A street within the SE16 postcode




CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Lived here
KJ   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 12:34 GMT   

Family
1900’s Cranmer family lived here at 105 (changed to 185 when road was re-numbered)
James Cranmer wife Louisa ( b.Logan)
They had 3 children one being my grandparent William (Bill) CRANMER married to grandmother “Nancy” He used to go to
Glengall Tavern in Bird in Bush Rd ,now been converted to flats.

Reply
Lived here
Christine Clark   
Added: 20 Feb 2021 11:27 GMT   

Number 44 (1947 - 1967)
The Clark’s moved here from Dorking my father worked on the Thames as a captain of shell mex tankers,there were three children, CHristine, Barbara and Frank, my mother was Ida and my father Frank.Our house no 44 and 42 were pulled down and we were relocated to Bromley The rest of our family lived close by in Milton Court Rd, Brocklehurat Street, Chubworthy street so one big happy family..lovely days.

Reply

Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

Reply
Comment
Daryl   
Added: 5 Feb 2021 07:25 GMT   

Heron Court Pomeroy Street
Heron Court was built in 1999. There are twelve, one bedroom flats to the front of Heron Court and behind, which can’t be seen from the road, four, four bedroom houses. The properties are owned by Hexagon Housing Association with occupants of the flats being tenants that are cared for by Southwark Social Welfare for mental/health issues.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Kim Johnson   
Added: 24 Jun 2021 19:17 GMT   

Limehouse Causeway (1908)
My great grandparents were the first to live in 15 Tomlins Terrace, then my grandparents and parents after marriage. I spent the first two years of my life there. My nan and her family lived at number 13 Tomlins Terrace. My maternal grandmother lived in Maroon house, Blount Street with my uncle. Nan, my mum and her brothers were bombed out three times during the war.

Reply
Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

Reply
Comment
Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

Reply

   
Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 2 Jun 2021 16:58 GMT   

Parachute bomb 1941
Charles Thomas Bailey of 82 Morley Road was killed by the parachute bomb March 1941

Reply

   
Added: 1 Jun 2021 12:41 GMT   

Abbeville Road (1940 street directory)
North west side
1A Clarke A S Ltd, motor engineers
15 Plumbers, Glaziers & Domestic Engineers Union
25 Dixey Edward, florist
27 Vicary Miss Doris J, newsagent
29 Stenning John Andrew, dining rooms
31 Clarke & Williams, builders
33 Hill Mrs Theodora, confectioner
35 Golding W & sons, corn dealers
... here is Shandon road ...
37 Pennington Mrs Eliz Harvie, wine & spirit merchant
39 Westminster Catering Co Ltd, ham, beef & tongue dealers
41 Masters A (Clapham) Ltd, butchers
43 Thomas Euan Ltd, grocers
45 Garrett C T & Co Ltd, undertakers
47 Mayle T & Sons, fishmongers
49 Mayles Ltd, fruiterers
51 & 73 Hardy Arthur Sydney, draper
53 United Dairies (London) Ltd
... here is Narbonne avenue ...
55 Norris William Lennox, baker
57 Silver Star Laundry Ltd
59 Thorp John, oilman
61 Bidgood Leonard George, boot makers
63 Wilkie Rt Miln, chemist
65 Gander George Albert Isaac, hairdresser
67 Harris Alfred William, greengrocer
69 & 71 Lambert Ernest & Son Ltd, grocers
... here is Hambolt road ...
73 & 51 Hardy Arthur Sydney, draper
75 Cambourn Frederick, butcher
77 Siggers Clement, chemist
77 Post, Money Order, Telephone Call & Telegraph Office & Savings Bank
79 Hemmings William, baker
... here is Elms road ...
85 Cornish Joseph
91 Bedding Mrs
151 Johnson Mrs H K
157 Robinson Albert Ernest, grainer
173 Yardleys London & Provincial Stores Ltd, wine & spirit merchants
175 Clark Alfred, butcher
175A Morley Douglas Frederick, confectioner
... here is Crescent lane ...
... her is St Alphonsus road ...

South east side
... here is Trouville road ...
4 Bossy Miss, private school
... here are Bonneville gardens ...
24 Osborn Charles Edward, ladies hairdresser
24 Hall H Ltd, builders
24A Walton Lodge Laundry Ltd
... here are Shandon road & Abbeville mansions ...
28 Copley Fred Smith, chemist
30 Finch H G Ltd, laundry
32 Carter William Alfred, furniture dealer
34 Spriggs Charles & Co, wireless supplies dealer
36 Miles Frederick William, confectioner
38 Pitman Frederick, hairdresser
40 Rowe Frederick F, valeting service
42 Modridge Edward J, oilman
... here is Narbonne avenue ...
44 Southorn Albert, butcher
46 Brown Ernest, fruiterer
48 Stanley Mrs A A, confectioner
50 Fryatt Owen, delixatessen store
52 Benbrooks, domestic stores
54 Davis William Clifford, boot repairer
56 Blogg Alfred, newsagent
58 Rowlands Thomas & Sons, dairy
... here are Hambalt, Elms, Franconia, Caldervale & Leppoc roads ...
124 Clarke Frederick, decorator
... here are Crescent lane, Briarwood road & Park hill ...

Reply
Comment
Boo Horton    
Added: 31 May 2021 13:39 GMT   

Angel & Trumpet, Stepney Green
The Angel & Trumpet Public House in Stepney Green was run by my ancestors in the 1930’s. Unfortunately, it was a victim on WWII and was badly damaged and subsequently demolished. I have one photograph that I believe to bethe pub, but it doesn’t show much more that my Great Aunt cleaning the steps.

Reply

NEARBY STREETS
Abercorn Way, SE1 Abercorn Way is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Ablett Street, SE16 Ablett Street is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Acanthus Drive, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Achilles Close, SE1 Achilles Close is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Admiral Hyson Industrial Estate, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Ainsdale Drive, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Argyle Way, SE16 Argyle Way is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Avondale Square, SE1 Avondale Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Barkworth Road, SE16 Barkworth Road is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Bermondsey Trading Estate, SE16 Bermondsey Trading Estate is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Bramcote Grove, SE16 Bramcote Grove is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Camilla Road, SE16 Camilla Road is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Canal Grove, SE15 Canal Grove is a road in the SE15 postcode area
Catlin Street, SE16 Catlin Street is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Chevron Apartments, SE1 Chevron Apartments is a block.
Corbetts Lane, SE16 Corbetts Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Corbetts Passage, SE16 Corbetts Passage is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Cranswick Road, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Credon Road, SE16 Credon Road is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Crown Place Apartments, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Culloden Close, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Debnams Road, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Delaford Road, SE16 Delaford Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Eagle Close, SE16 Eagle Close is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Esmeralda Road, SE1 Esmeralda Road is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Fallow Court, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Fern Walk, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Frank Mews, SE1 Frank Mews is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Gallewall Trading Estate, SE16 Gallewall Trading Estate is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Galway Close, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Gerards Close, SE16 Gerards Close is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Gleneagles Close, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Hannah Mary Way, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Hatcham Road, SE15 Hatcham Road is one of the streets of London in the SE15 postal area.
Holywell Close, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Hyson Road, SE16 Hyson Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Ilderton Road, SE16 Ilderton Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Jarrow Road, SE16 Jarrow Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Kingsdown Close, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Kite House, SE16 A street within the SE1 postcode
Kotree way, SE1 Kotree way is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Landmann House, SE16 Residential block
Langdon Way, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Livesey Place, SE15 Livesey Place is one of the streets of London in the SE15 postal area.
Lovegrove Street, SE16 Lovegrove Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Lynton Road, SE1 Lynton Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Manor Estate, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Marlborough Grove, SE1 Marlborough Grove is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Mason Close, SE1 A street within the SE16 postcode
Masters Drive, SE16 Masters Drive is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Muirfield Close, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Olmar Street, SE1 Olmar Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Penarth Centre, SE15 A street within the SE15 postcode
Penarth Street, SE15 Penarth Street is one of the streets of London in the SE15 postal area.
Record Street, SE15 Record Street is one of the streets of London in the SE15 postal area.
Rennie Estate, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Rossetti Road, SE16 Rossetti Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Rotherhithe Business Estate, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Rotherhithe New Road, SE16 Rotherhithe New Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Rotherithe New Road, SE16 Rotherithe New Road is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Ruby Street, SE15 Ruby Street is one of the streets of London in the SE15 postal area.
Ruby Triangle, SE15 This is a street in the SE15 postcode area
Ryder Drive, SE16 Ryder Drive is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Sandgate Street, SE15 Sandgate Street is one of the streets of London in the SE15 postal area.
Sheppard Drive, SE16 Sheppard Drive is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Shepparoad Drive, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Sherwood Gardens, SE16 Sherwood Gardens is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Simms Road, SE1 Simms Road is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Six Bridges Trading Estate, SE1 Six Bridges Trading Estate is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Splendour Walk, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
St. Davids Close, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Stevenson Crescent, SE16 Stevenson Crescent is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Stubbs Drive, SE16 Stubbs Drive is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Sunningdale Close, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Tenda Road, SE16 Tenda Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Troon Close, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Turnberry Close, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Varcoe Road, SE16 Varcoe Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Verney Road, SE16 Verney Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Verney Way, SE16 Verney Way is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Weald Close, SE16 Weald Close is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Whittaker Way, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Zampa Road, SE16 Zampa Road is one of a series of roads laid out over market gardens in the 1860s.

NEARBY PUBS
Club favour This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Bermondsey

The name Bermondsey first appears in a letter from Pope Constantine (708-715), in which he grants privileges to a monastery at ’Vermundesei’, then in the hands of the abbot of Medeshamstede, as Peterborough was known at the time.

Though Bermondsey’s name may derive from Beornmund’s island (whoever the Anglo-Saxon Beornmund was, is another matter), but Bermondsey is likely to have been a higher, drier spot in an otherwise marshy area, rather than a real island.

The area first appears in a letter from Pope Constantine (708-715), in which he grants privileges to a monastery at Vermundesei, then in the hands of the abbot of Medeshamstede, as Peterborough was known at the time.

Bermondsey appears in Domesday Book. It was then held by King William, though a small part was in the hands of Robert, Count of Mortain, the king’s half brother, and younger brother of Odo of Bayeux, then Earl of Kent.

Bermondsey Abbey was founded as a Cluniac priory in 1082, and was dedicated to St Saviour. Monks from the abbey began the development of the area, cultivating the land and embanking the riverside. They turned an adjacent tidal inlet at the mouth of the River Neckinger into a dock, named St Saviour’s Dock after their abbey. The Knights Templar also owned land here and gave their names to one of the most distinctive streets in London, Shad Thames (a corruption of ’St John at Thames’). Other ecclesiastical properties stood nearby at Tooley (a corruption of ’St Olave’s’) Street, located in the Archbishop of Canterbury’s manor of Southwark, where wealthy citizens and clerics had their houses, including the priors of Lewes and St Augustine’s, Canterbury, and the abbot of Battle.

As it developed over the centuries, Bermondsey underwent many changes. After the Great Fire of London, it was settled by the well-to-do and took on the character of a garden suburb especially along the lines of Grange Road, as Bermondsey Street became more urbanised. A pleasure garden was founded there in the 17th century, commemorated by the Cherry Garden Pier. Samuel Pepys visited ’Jamaica House’ at Cherry Gardens in 1664 and recorded in his diary that he had left it "singing finely".

Though not many buildings survive from this era, one notable exception is the church of St Mary Magdalen in Bermondsey Street, completed in 1690 (although a church has been recorded on this site from the 13th Century). This church came through both 19th-century redevelopment and The Blitz unscathed. It is not just an unusual survivor for Bermondsey; buildings of this era are relative rarities in Inner London in general.

In the 18th century, the discovery of a spring from the river Neckinger in the area led to Bermondsey becoming a spa leisure resort, as the area between Grange and Jamaica Roads called Spa Road commemorates.

It was from the Bermondsey riverside that the painter J.M.W. Turner executed his famous painting of The Fighting Temeraire Tugged to her Last Berth to be Broken Up (1839), depicting the veteran warship being towed to Rotherhithe to be scrapped.

By the mid-19th century parts of Bermondsey, especially along the riverside had become a notorious slum — with the arrival of industrial plants, docks and immigrant housing. The area around St Saviour’s Dock, known as Jacob’s Island, was one of the worst in London. It was immortalised by Charles Dickens’s novel Oliver Twist, in which the principal villain Bill Sikes meets a nasty end in the mud of ’Folly Ditch’ an area which was known as Hickmans Folly — the scene of an attack by Spring Heeled Jack in 1845 — surrounding Jacob’s Island. Dickens provides a vivid description of what it was like:

<CITE>... crazy wooden galleries common to the backs of half a dozen houses, with holes from which to look upon the slime beneath; windows, broken and patched, with poles thrust out, on which to dry the linen that is never there; rooms so small, so filthy, so confined, that the air would seem to be too tainted even for the dirt and squalor which they shelter; wooden chambers thrusting themselves out above the mud and threatening to fall into it — as some have done; dirt-besmeared walls and decaying foundations, every repulsive lineament of poverty, every loathsome indication of filth, rot, and garbage: all these ornament the banks of Jacob’s Island.</CITE>

Bermondsey Town Hall was built on Spa Road in 1881. The area was extensively redeveloped during the 19th century and early 20th century with the expansion of the river trade and the arrival of the railways. London’s first passenger railway terminus was built by the London to Greenwich Railway in 1836 at London Bridge. The first section to be used was between the Spa Road Station and Deptford High Street. This local station had closed by 1915.

The industrial boom of the 19th century was an extension of Bermondsey’s manufacturing role in earlier eras. As in the East End, industries that were deemed too noisome to be carried on within the narrow confines of the City of London had been located here — one such that came to dominate central Bermondsey, away from the riverfront, was the processing and trading of leather and hides. Many buildings from this era survive around Leathermarket Street including the huge Leather, Hide and Wool Exchange (now residential and small work spaces). Hepburn and Gale’s tannery (disused as of early 2007) on Long Lane is also a substantial survivor of the leather trade.

Peek, Frean and Co was established in 1857 at Dockhead, Bermondsey by James Peek and George Hender Frean. They moved to a larger plant in Clements Road in 1866, leading to the nickname ’Biscuit Town’ for Bermondsey, where they continued baking until the brand was discontinued in 1989. Wee Willie Harris (usually credited as the first British rock and roll player) came from Bermondsey. He was known as Britain’s Wild man of Rock N’ Roll). He also worked in Peak Freans.

To the east of Tower Bridge, Bermondsey’s 3½ miles of riverside were lined with warehouses and wharves, of which the best known is Butler’s Wharf. They suffered severe damage in World War II bombing and became redundant in the 1960s following the collapse of the river trade. After standing derelict for some years, many of the wharves were redeveloped under the aegis of the London Docklands Development Corporation during the 1980s. They have now been converted into a mixture of residential and commercial accommodations and have become some of the most upmarket and expensive properties in London. In 1997, US President Bill Clinton and Prime Minister Tony Blair visited the area to dine at the Pont de la Tour restaurant at Butler’s Wharf.

Millwall F.C. moved to a new stadium on Coldblow Lane in 1910, having previously played in Millwall, but have kept their original name despite playing at the opposite side of the River Thames to the Millwall area. They played at The Den until 1993, when they relocated to the New Den nearby. A public sports centre is also included in their stadium.

Reorganisation of lines and closure of stations left Bermondsey’s transport links with the rest of London poorer in the late twentieth century. This was remedied in 2000 with the opening of Bermondsey tube station on the Jubilee Line Extension.

Bermondsey tube station was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects and was originally intended to have a multi-storey office building sitting on top.


LOCAL PHOTOS
St. James’s Rd. Bermondsey c1910.
TUM image id: 1557162129
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
St. James’s Rd. Bermondsey c1910.
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

A 2015 comparison between the cheapest and most expensive properties upon the 1930s London Monopoly board showed that the difference had lessened dramatically
Credit: Ellie Flynn
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The "Ha’penny Bumper" (tram) pictured on St James’s Road, SE1
Old London postcard
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Print-friendly version of this page