Pereira Street, E1

Road in/near Whitechapel, existed between the 1820s and 1914

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Road · * · E1 ·
October
31
2020
Pereira Street ran north/south in Bethnal Green.

Pereira Street ran from Neath Place in the north down to Bath Street at its south end.

Directly after its construction it was two streets - Duke Street north of the junction with Thomas Passage and Wellington Street to the south. The latter was the first of the two to be built - marked on the 1820 map without Duke Street. Presumably the two were named after the victor at Waterloo, one after the other.

Halfway along, the Freemasons Arms pub was situated at 45 Pereira Street.

It was swept away as part of slum clearances in Whitechapel, Limehouse and Shoreditch.




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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Lived here
Linda    
Added: 18 Feb 2021 22:03 GMT   

Pereira Street, E1
My grandfather Charles Suett lived in Periera Street & married a widowed neighbour there. They later moved to 33 Bullen House, Collingwood Street where my father was born.

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Tricia   
Added: 27 Apr 2021 12:05 GMT   

St George in the East Church
This Church was opened in 1729, designed by Hawksmore. Inside destroyed by incendrie bomb 16th April 1941. Rebuilt inside and finished in 1964. The building remained open most of the time in a temporary prefab.

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Marion James   
Added: 12 Mar 2021 17:43 GMT   

26 Edith Street Haggerston
On Monday 11th October 1880 Charlotte Alice Haynes was born at 26 Edith Street Haggerston the home address of her parents her father Francis Haynes a Gilder by trade and her mother Charlotte Alice Haynes and her two older siblings Francis & George who all welcomed the new born baby girl into the world as they lived in part of the small Victorian terraced house which was shared by another family had an outlook view onto the world of the Imperial Gas Works site - a very grey drab reality of the life they were living as an East End working class family - 26 Edith Street no longer stands in 2021 - the small rundown polluted terrace houses of Edith Street are long since gone along with the Gas Companies buildings to be replaced with green open parkland that is popular in 21st century by the trendy residents of today - Charlotte Alice Haynes (1880-1973) is the wife of my Great Grand Uncle Henry Pickett (1878-1930) As I research my family history I slowly begin to understand the life my descendants had to live and the hardships that they went through to survive - London is my home and there are many areas of this great city I find many of my descendants living working and dying in - I am yet to find the golden chalice! But in all truthfulness my family history is so much more than hobby its an understanding of who I am as I gather their stories. Did Charlotte Alice Pickett nee Haynes go on to live a wonderful life - no I do not think so as she became a widow in 1930 worked in a canteen and never remarried living her life in and around Haggerston & Hackney until her death in 1973 with her final resting place at Manor Park Cemetery - I think Charlotte most likely excepted her lot in life like many women from her day, having been born in the Victorian era where the woman had less choice and standing in society, which is a sad state of affairs - So I will endeavour to write about Charlotte and the many other women in my family history to give them the voice of a life they so richly deserve to be recorded !

Edith Street was well situated for the new public transport of two railway stations in 1880 :- Haggerston Railway Station opened in 1867 & Cambridge Heath Railway Station opened in 1872


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Born here
Beverly Sand   
Added: 3 Apr 2021 17:19 GMT   

Havering Street, E1
My mother was born at 48 Havering Street. That house no longer exists. It disappeared from the map by 1950. Family name Schneider, mother Ray and father Joe. Joe’s parents lived just up the road at 311 Cable Street

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Boo Horton    
Added: 31 May 2021 13:39 GMT   

Angel & Trumpet, Stepney Green
The Angel & Trumpet Public House in Stepney Green was run by my ancestors in the 1930’s. Unfortunately, it was a victim on WWII and was badly damaged and subsequently demolished. I have one photograph that I believe to bethe pub, but it doesn’t show much more that my Great Aunt cleaning the steps.

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

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Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

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Lived here
Kim Johnson   
Added: 24 Jun 2021 19:17 GMT   

Limehouse Causeway (1908)
My great grandparents were the first to live in 15 Tomlins Terrace, then my grandparents and parents after marriage. I spent the first two years of my life there. My nan and her family lived at number 13 Tomlins Terrace. My maternal grandmother lived in Maroon house, Blount Street with my uncle. Nan, my mum and her brothers were bombed out three times during the war.

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Comment
   
Added: 13 Jan 2021 13:11 GMT   

Zealand Rd E3 used to be called Auckland Road
Zealand Road E3 used to be called Auckland Road. I seen it on a Philips ABC of London dated about 1925. There is a coalhole cover in nearby Driffield R oad showing a suppliers address in Auckland Road.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

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Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

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Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

Reply

STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

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Sir Walter Besant   
Added: 11 Nov 2021 18:47 GMT   

Sir Walter adds....
All the ground facing Wirtemberg Street at Chip and Cross Streets is being levelled for building and the old houses are disappearing fast. The small streets leading through into little Manor Street are very clean and tenanted by poor though respectable people, but little Manor Street is dirty, small, and narrow. Manor Street to Larkhall Rise is a wide fairly clean thoroughfare of mixed shops and houses which improves towards the north. The same may be said of Wirtemberg Street, which commences poorly, but from the Board School north is far better than at the Clapham end.

Source: London: South of the Thames - Chapter XX by Sir Walter Besant (1912)

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

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Comment
tom   
Added: 3 Nov 2021 05:16 GMT   

I met
someone here 6 years ago

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Fion Anderson   
Added: 2 Nov 2021 12:55 GMT   

Elstree not Borehamwood
Home of the UK film industry

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Pavilion Theatre The Pavilion Theatre at 191–193 Whitechapel Road was the first major theatre to open in the East End.

NEARBY STREETS
Adelina Grove, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Amiel Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Assembly Passage, E1 Assembly Passage is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Barnsley Street, E1 Barnsley Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Benjamin Truman Close, E1 Benjamin Truman Close is a location in London.
Birkbeck Street, E2 Birkbeck Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Brady Street, E1 Brady Street is a road running north-south from Three Colts Lane to Whitechapel Road.
Braintree Street, E1 Braintree Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Buckfast Street, E2 Buckfast Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Buckhurst Street, E1 Buckhurst Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Buckhurstreet Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Cambridge Heath Road, E1 Cambridge Heath Road was originally Cambridge Road.
Castlemain Street, E1 Castlemain Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Cavell Street, E1 Cavell Street is a road in the E1W postcode area
Cephas Street, E1 Cephas Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Cleveland Grove, E1 Cleveland Grove is a road in the E1 postcode area
Cleveland Way, E1 Cleveland Way is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Colebert Avenue, E1 Colebert Avenue is a road in the E1 postcode area
Collingwood Street, E1 Collingwood Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Coopers Close, E1 Coopers Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Corfield Street, E2 Corfield Street runs along the route of the former Camden Gardens.
Court Street, E1 Court Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Coventry Road, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Coverley Close, E1 Coverley Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Cudworth Street, E1 Cudworth Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Darling Row, E1 Darling Row is a road in the E1 postcode area
Davenant Street, E1 Davenant Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Dunbridge Street, E2 Dunbridge Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Durward Street, E1 Durward Street is a narrow thoroughfare running east-west from Brady Street to Baker’s Row (today’s Vallance Road).
Durwaroad Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
East Mount Street, E1 East Mount Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Edwards Passage, E1 Edwards Passage is a location in London.
Fakruddin Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Fulbourne Street, E1 Fulbourne Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Glass Street, E2 Glass Street is a road in the E2 postcode area
Granary Road, E1 Granary Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Greenheath Business Centre, E2 Greenheath Business Centre is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Grindall House, E1 Residential block
Hadleigh Close, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Hadleigh Street, E1 Hadleigh Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Hadleigh Street, E1 Hadleigh Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Hadleigh Walk, E1 Hadleigh Walk is a road in the E6 postcode area
Headlam Street, E1 Headlam Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Hemming Street, E1 Hemming Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Herald Street, E2 Herald Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Hereford Street, E2 Hereford Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Jarman House, E1 Residential block
Kelsey Street, E2 Kelsey Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Key Close, E1 Key Close is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Lang Street, E1 Lang Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Lindley Street, E1 Lindley Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Lomas Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Malcolm Place, E1 Malcolm Place is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Malcolm Road, E1 Malcolm Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Mantus Close, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Mantus Road, E1 Mantus Road is a road in the E1 postcode area
Mape Street, E2 Mape Street is a road in the E2 postcode area
Maples Place, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Menotti Street, E2 This is a street in the E2 postcode area
Merceron Street, E1 Merceron Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Mile End Road, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Milward Street, E1 Milward Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Moss Close, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Mount Terrace, E1 Mount Terrace is a road in the E1 postcode area
O’Leary Square, E1 O’Leary Square is a road in the E1 postcode area
Orion House, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Ramsey Street, E2 Ramsey Street is a road in the E2 postcode area
Raven Row, E1 Raven Row is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Regal Close, E1 Regal Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Sale Street, E2 Sale Street is a road in the E2 postcode area
Scott Street, E1 Scott Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Selby Street, E1 Selby Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Somerford Street, E1 Somerford Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Spring Walk, E1 Spring Walk is a road in the E1 postcode area
Stepney Green Court, E1 Stepney Green Court is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Stothard Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Surma Close, E1 Surma Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Tapp Street, E2 Tapp Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Tent Street, E1 Tent Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Three Colts Lane, E1 Three Colts Lane is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Trahorn Close, E1 Trahorn Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Trinity Green, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Trinity Mews, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Underwood Road, E1 Underwood Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Vallance Road, E1 Vallance Road is a significant road running north-south from Bethnal Green Road to Whitechapel Road.
Vallance Road, E2 Vallance Road is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Vawdrey Close, E1 Vawdrey Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Wessex Street, E1 Wessex Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Whitechapel Road, E1 Whitechapel Road is a major arterial road in East London.
Wickford Street, E1 Wickford Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Wickforoad Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Wilmot Street, E2 Wilmot Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Winthrop Street, E1 Winthrop Street was formerly a narrow street running east-west from Brady Street to Durward Street.
Witan Street, E2 Witan Street is one of the streets of London in the E2 postal area.
Wodeham Gardens, E1 Wodeham Gardens is a road in the E1 postcode area
Wyllen Close, E1 Wyllen Close is a road in the E1 postcode area


Whitechapel

Whitechapel is a neighbourhood whose heart is Whitechapel Road itself, named for a small chapel of ease dedicated to St Mary.

By the late 1500s Whitechapel and the surrounding area had started becoming 'other half' of London. Located downwind of the genteel sections of west London which were to see the expansion of Westminster Abbey and construction of Buckingham Palace, it naturally attracted the more fragrant activities of the city, particularly tanneries, breweries, foundries (including the Whitechapel Bell Foundry which later cast Philadelphia's Liberty Bell and also Big Ben), slaughterhouses and, close by to the south, the gigantic Billingsgate fish market, famous in its day for the ornately foul language of the extremely Cockney fishwomen who worked there.

Population shifts from rural areas to London from the 1600s to the mid 1800s resulted in great numbers of more or less destitute people taking up residence amidst the industries and mercantile interests that had attracted them. By the 1840s Whitechapel, along with the enclaves of Wapping, Aldgate, Bethnal Green, Mile End, Limehouse and Stepney (collectively known today as the East End), had evolved, or devolved, into classic 'dickensian' London. Whitechapel Road itself was not particularly squalid through most of this period - it was the warren of small dark streets branching from it that contained the greatest suffering, filth and danger, especially Dorset St., Thrawl St., Berners St. (renamed Henriques St.), Wentworth St. and others.

In the Victorian era the base population of poor English country stock was swelled by immigrants from all over, particularly Irish and Jewish. 1888 saw the depredations of the Whitechapel Murderer, later known as 'Jack the Ripper'. In 1902, American author Jack London, looking to write a counterpart to Jacob Riis's seminal book How the Other Half Lives, donned ragged clothes and boarded in Whitechapel, detailing his experiences in The People of the Abyss. Riis had recently documented the astoundingly bad conditions in the leading city of the United States. Jack London, a socialist, thought it worthwhile to explore conditions in the leading city of the nation that had created modern capitalism. He concluded that English poverty was far rougher than the American variety. The juxtaposition of the poverty, homelessness, exploitive work conditions, prostitution, and infant mortality of Whitechapel and other East End locales with some of the greatest personal wealth the world has ever seen made it a focal point for leftist reformers of all kinds, from George Bernard Shaw, whose Fabian Society met regularly in Whitechapel, to Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, who boarded and led rallies in Whitechapel during his exile from Russia.

Whitechapel remained poor (and colourful) through the first half of the 20th Century, though somewhat less desperately so. It suffered great damage in the V2 German rocket attacks and the Blitz of World War II. Since then, Whitechapel has lost its notoriety, though it is still thoroughly working class. The Bangladeshis are the most visible migrant group there today and it is home to many aspiring artists and shoestring entrepreneurs.

Since the 1970s, Whitechapel and other nearby parts of East London have figured prominently in London's art scene. Probably the most prominent art venue is the Whitechapel Art Gallery, founded in 1901 and long an outpost of high culture in a poor neighbourhood. As the neighbourhood has gentrified, it has gained citywide, and even international, visibility and support.

Whitechapel, is a London Underground and London Overground station, on Whitechapel Road was opened in 1876 by the East London Railway on a line connecting Liverpool Street station in the City of London with destinations south of the River Thames. The station site was expanded in 1884, and again in 1902, to accommodate the services of the Metropolitan District Railway, a predecessor of the London Underground. The London Overground section of the station was closed between 2007 and 27 April 2010 for rebuilding, initially reopening for a preview service on 27 April 2010 with the full service starting on 23 May 2010.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Buck's Row (Durward Street) in 1938.
TUM image id: 1490922288
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Pollard Row (1939)
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Whitechapel Road
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Black Lion Yard looking north, 1961.
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Winthrop Street looking east, c.1970.
TUM image id: 1490921196
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In the neighbourhood...

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Bethnal Green railway station entrance, some distance away from its namesake Central line tube station. The photo was taken on 25 October 2008
Credit: Wiki Commons/Sunil060902
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A view east along Whitechapel Road including the Pavilion Theatre. The Pavilion was the first major theatre to open in the East End. It opened in 1827 and closed in 1935.
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Brady Street looking toward the junction with Durward Street, 1979.
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Houses in Cambridge Road, Bethnal Green. Cambridge Road was renamed to Cambridge Heath Road in 1938.
Credit: English Heritage
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Buck's Row (Durward Street) in 1938.
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Pollard Row (1939)
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Settles Street, E1 (1940) This photo shows a fine old school sign which featured a torch. A direction sign to a Second World War shelter is on the wall.
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Whitechapel Road
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Winthrop Street looking east, c.1970.
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Corfield Street
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