About the project

This is the blog for The Underground Map website – the history site for London.

The project is adding historical maps of London from every decade between 1800 and 1940, a period when London expanded from a city which did not extend beyond Mayfair, Vauxhall, Bethnal Green or Bermondsey.┬áDuring the Napoleanic Wars at the beginning of this period, Regent’s Park was still countryside and taking the waters of Kilburn was the height of fashion. Our mapping ends at the dawn of the Second World War with London having expanded to its modern size – the Green Belt legislation put paid to further expansion.

There are two parts to the website – the main mapping website and this, the blog, which features London highlights.

To access the main part of the website, search or use the dropdown immediately below.
Or continue to explore the blog – the latest articles can be found at the bottom of this page.

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Croydon

Derived from the Conservation Area guides of the London Borough of Croydon Bronze Age remains have been found in central Croydon and there are suggestions that an early settlement may have been a Roman staging post on the road between London and Portslade (Brighton). There is no conclusive evidence of the precise line of the …

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The Fascination of London: Belgravia and Pimlico

Belgravia and Pimlico – The Fascination of London by Geraldine Edith Mitton The Eia estate The larger portion of the district is included in the ancient estate of Eia, 890 acres in extent, reaching from the Bayswater Road to the Thames, which was given by William the Conqueror to Geoffrey de Mandeville, who at his …

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Beresford Square, SE18

Beresford Square was formed in the early 19th century and was named after the Anglo-Irish general William Beresford, Master-General of the Ordnance and Governor of the Royal Military Academy. Beresford Square was not a laid-out square but the result of a series of clearances. Therefore, some of the buildings are older than the square. In …

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Aldwych

Two Roman roads ran out of the City in this direction – High Holborn was the northern route. Evidence of Roman material has been found at the northern end of Kingsway. The area bounded by Trafalgar Square to the west, the Strand and the Thames on the south, and Oxford Street-High Holborn on the north …

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