A Topographical Dictionary of London: N

NAG’S HEAD COURT. – 1. is in Drury Lane. – 2. is in Golden Lane, Barbican, the second turning on the left hand, about twelve houses from Old Street. – 3. is also in Golden Lane, about two or three houses on the right hand from Barbican. – 4. is in Gracechurch Street, about a quarter of a mile from London Bridge.

NAG’S HEAD YARD, Oxford Street, is nearly opposite Market Street.

NAKED BOY COURT, Ludgate Hill, is about seven houses westward of the Old Bailey.

NARROW STREET, Limehouse, is at Ratcliffe Cross Stairs, and extends into Fore Street.

NARROW WALL, Lambeth, is the continuation of Pedlar’s Acre, by Westminster Bridge, to Upper Ground Street, Blackfriars’ Road.

NASSAU STREET, Soho, is the second turning on the right hand side of King Street, going from Princes Street.

NATIONAL DEBT, OFFICE FOR THE REDUCTION OF, and for granting Life Annuities, is a handsome brick building, on the eastern side of the Old Jewry, designed by John Soane, Esq., R.A. In one of the vestibules is a fine statue, in marble, of the late Wm. Pitt, by Westmacott. The business of this office is conducted by the Speaker of the House of Commons, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, the Master of the Rolls, the Chief Baron of the Exchequer, the Accountant General in Chancery, the Governor and Deputy Governor of the Bank of England, as Commission�??ers ex officio; First Branch, Samuel Higham, Esq., Secretary and Comptroller General; George William Cuthbert, Esq., Assistant Secretary and Comptroller; ten Clerks; Second Branch, John Finlayson, Esq., Actuary and Cheque Accountant; Messrs. Thomas Rippon and Thomas Bros, Agents; Messrs. Cole and Mullins, Brokers.

NATIONAL GALLERY OF PICTURES, THE, is held at a temporary mansion, formerly the residence and gallery of the late John Julius Angerstein, Esq., whose fine collection is still retained within its walls. On the death of that gentleman, nearly the whole of his valuable collection of pictures was purchased in March 1825, by the Earl of Liverpool, on the part of His Majesty’s government, for £50,000, as the commencement of a National Public Gallery of Pictures. It includes some of the very finest works of Claude, the Caracci, Coreggio, Parmegiano, Rembrandt, Rubens, Titian, Hogarth, Vandyke, West, Wilkie, Reynolds and other eminent masters. The late Sir George Beaumont, Bart., gave many fine and valuable pictures, and other private donors have added to the number. The pictures are open to public inspection four days in the week, and to the private study of artists, under certain regulations, on the other two. The gallery is under the management of the Earl of Aberdeen, Viscount Goderich, Lord Famborough, the Right Hon. Sir Robert Peel, Bart., and the Hon. George W. Agar Ellis, Trustees; Wm. Seguier, Esq., Keeper and Secretary.

NATIONAL MONUMENTS, COMMITTEE FOR ERECTING AND INSPECTING OF, is held at the Treasury Offices, in Downing Street, Westminster The present officers are Lord Farnborough, Chairman; the Marquess of Stafford, the Earl of Aberdeen, the Right Hon. Reginald Pole Carew, Thomas Hope, William Locke and Henry Bankes, Esqs., Committee; Charles Beloe, Esq., Secretary.

NAVAL CHARITABLE SOCIETY, THE, is held at the Navy Pay Office, in Somerset Place, and was instituted in 1791, for the benevolent purpose of relieving the Indigent Orphans, Widows and Children of Sea Officers, as well as Sea Officers themselves, if reduced by misfortune to poverty. It is under the patronage and management of The King, Patron; Admiral Lord Gambier, President; thirteen other Admirals, Vice Presidents; Captain William Browell, Rear Admiral James Bowen, and Rear Admiral Itrem Rodd, Trustees; and Samuel Hancock, Esq., Navy Pay Office, Secretary.

NAVY OFFICE, Somerset Place, is on the south side of the quadrangle, facing the entrance from the Strand. In this office all affairs relative to the Royal Navy are managed by Commissioners under the Lords of the Admiralty. The principal officers are. Sir T. Byan Martin, K.C.B., M.P., Comptroller; the Hon. Henry Legge, Deputy Comptroller; Joseph Tucker and Sir Robert Seppings, Knt., Surveyors; John Deas Thompson, Esq., Accomptant General; Robert G, Middleton, Esq., Storekeeper General; Henry Courtenay Boyle, Esq., Superintendant of Transports; George Smith, Esq., Secretary; William Wheatley, Esq., Librarian; various clerks in the secretary’s office, the ticket and wages branch, the office for bill and accounts, branch for examining foreign accounts, office for stores, a committee of surveyors, transport branch, and other departments connected with the management of the Royal Navy.

NAVY PAY OFFICE, THE, Somerset Place, is on the right hand side of the quadrangle, entering from the Strand. This department of the Royal Navy is under the direction of the Treasurer and Paymaster who pay for all the stores for the use of the Royal Navy, and the wages of the sailors in his Majesty’s service. The present officers are the Right Hon. Thomas Frankland Lewis, F.R.S., Treasurer of the Navy; Capt. Thomas Huskisson, R.N., Paymaster of the Navy. There are also numerous clerks in the treasurer’s branch, the wages’ branch, superintendents of the �???payments of Deptford and Woolwich Dockyards, ditto at Plymouth, Portsmouth, Sheerness, &c., the victualling department, inspectors, cashiers, &c. The hours of attendance are from 11 to 2.

NAVAL AND MILITARY BIBLE SOCIETY. – [see Bible Societies, No. 3]

NAVAL ROW, Blackwall, is the continuation eastward of Poplar High Street, going from Blackwall Causeway towards the East India Dock.

NEAL’S PASSAGE, Seven Dials, is three houses on the right hand side of Great Earl Street, going from King Street.

NEAT BOY’S COURT, Spitalfields, is the third turning on the right hand side of Fashion Street, going from Brick Lane.

NEAT HOUSES, Chelsea, is a district so called on the north bank of the Thames, near Battersea or Chelsea Bridge.

NEAT HOUSES ROW, Chelsea, Pimlico, is the continuation of George’s Row, going from the bridge at Pimlico towards the Thames.

NECKINGER ROAD or LANE, Bermondsey, is about a furlong on the right hand side of Parker’s Row, going from Hickman’s Folly.

NEGRO SLAVES IN THE WEST INDIA ISLANDS, SOCIETY FOR THE CONVERSION OF, was incorporated by royal charter, in 1795. The present officers are, the Bishop of London, President; the Bishops of Durham, Winchester, Jamaica and Barbadoes, the Rt. Hon. Sir R. Peel, Bart, the Lord Mayor, and the Dean of Westminster, Vice Presidents; the Rev. John Barrett, D.D., Secretary; and Christopher Hodgson, Esq., Treasurer.

NELSON’S COURT. – 1. is in Ratcliffe Highway, a few houses eastward of St. George’s Church. – 2. is in Salmon Lane, Limehouse.

NELSON’S PASSAGE. – 1. is in St. Luke’s a few houses on the right hand side of Great Arthur Street, going from Goswell Street. – 2. is in Bowling Green Buildings, Mary-le-bone.

NELSON’S PLACE. – 1. is in Bowling Green Buildings, New Road, Mary-le-bone. – 2. is about the middle of the south side of New Street, City Road. – 3. is in Poplar High Street, a few houses eastward of the Green Dragon. – 4. is in Blackman Street, Southwark, about six houses on the right hand going from Lant Street towards the King’s Bench Prison. – 5. is in the London Road, St. George’s Fields.

NELSON SQUARE, Blackfriars’ Road, is about a quarter of a mile from the Bridge, the first turning on the left hand side of the road, going from Charlotte Street to the Obelisk.

NELSON STREET. – 1. is in the City Road, about half a mile on the left hand beyond Finsbury Square. – 2. is in Bethnal Green, behind Shoreditch Church. – 3. is in Red Lion Street, Goodman’s fields, about six houses on the right hand side going from Whitechapel High Street. – 4. is in Long Lane, Southwark.

NELSON TERRACE. – 1. is in the City Road, about a mile on the right hand from Finsbury Square. – 2. is in the High Road, Stoke Newington, on the west side from Shacklewell Lane to the Hare and Hounds.

NEPTUNE STREET. – 1. is in Wellclose Square, about the middle of the south side of the square, extending to Parson’s Green. – 2. is in Rotherhithe, the south continuation of Elephant Lane.

NETTLETON COURT, Aldersgate Street, is about ten houses on the right hand side, going from Falcon Street.

NEVIL’S COURT, Fetter Lane, is about the middle of the east side, and is named after the noble�??? family of the Nevills, who formerly had a mansion in its neighbourhood.

NEW BOND STREET. – [see Bond Street, New]

NEW BUILDINGS, Cow Lane, Snow Hill, is the first turning on the right hand side of Fox and Knot Court, going from Cow Lane.

NEW COURT HOUSE, Westminster. – [see Guildhall, Westminster]

NEW CHURCH, Strand. – [see St. Mary-le-Strand]

NEW COURT. – 1. is in the New Way, Orchard Street, Westminster, about seven houses on the left hand side going from Orchard Street. – 2. is in Little Chapel Street, Westminster, a few doors on the left hand from the east end of James Street. – 3. is in the Strand, near St. Clement’s Church. – 4. is in Carey Street, Chancery Lane, nearly opposite Serle Street. – 5. is in the Temple, the first turning on the left hand in Devereux Court, going from the Strand. – 6. is in Great New Street, Fetter Lane, three houses on the left hand going from West Harding Street. – 7. is about the middle of the west side of the Old Bailey. – 8. is in Portpool Lane, Gray’s Inn Lane, going towards Leather Lane. – 9. is in Goswell Street, about a quarter of a mile on the right hand northward of Barbican. – 10. is in Allen Street, Clerkenwell, the first turning on the right hand side going from Goswell Street. – 11. is in St. Peter’s Lane. West Smithfield, the second turning on the right hand going from St. John’s Street towards Cow Cross – 12. is in St. John’s Street, Clerkenwell, about the third of a mile on the left hand from West Smithfield. – 13. is in Cloth Fair, West Smithfield, the second turning on the left hand. – 14. is in Brick Lane, St. Luke’s, the first turning on the right hand. – 15. is in Fore Street, Cripplegate, near the north end of Wood Street. – 16. is in Moor Lane, Cripplegate. – 17. is on the right hand side of Swan Alley, Coleman Street. – 18. is in Bow Lane, Cheapside, the first turning on the right hand from Cheapside. – 19. is in St. Swithin’s Lane, Cannon Street, about the middle of the west side, or the third turning on the right hand going from Lombard Street. – 20. is in Throgmorton Street, about six houses on the right hand side going from the Bank of England towards Old Broad Street. – 21. is in Old Broad Street, the third turning on the right hand going from the Royal Exchange. – 22. is in Long Alley, Finsbury, a few doors on the left hand going from Eldon Street – 23. is in Crown Street, Finsbury, on the west side of Maxwell Court. – 24. is in Holywell Lane, Shoreditch. – 25. is in Acorn Alley, Bishopsgate. – 26. is in Church Street, Bethnal Green. – 27. is in Dorset Street, Spitalfields, about the middle of the north side. – 28. is in Brown’s Lane, Spitalfields, the second on the left hand. – 29. is in Great Pearl Street, Spitalfields. – 30. is in Quaker Street, Spitalfields. – 31. is in Fashion Street, Spitalfields. – 32. is in Wentworth Street, Spitalfields. – 31. is in King Street, Cree Church Lane, the second turning on the right hand going from Leadenhall Street. – 34. is in Crutched friars, a few houses on the left hand from Mark Lane. – 35. is the continuation of Well Yard, Goodman’s Fields. – 36. is in George Yard, Whitechapel. – 37. is in Bethnal Green, a few houses on the left hand from the north west corner of the green. – 38. is in White Street, Southwark.

NEW CUT, THE. – 1. is in Narrow Street, Limehouse, from the eastern side of the Drawbridge to the Commercial Road. – 2. is in Lambeth Marsh, the continuation westward of Charlotte Street, Blackfriars’ Road, opposite Surrey chapel.

NEWGATE, THE PRISON OF, is situated at the corner of Newgate Street, and the Old Bailey, and derives its nam�???e from the ancient city gate so called, which stood across Newgate Street, between Aldersgate and Ludgate. This ancient gate is supposed to have been so called, because it was erected in the reign of Henry I., several hundred years after the construction of the four original city gates. It is, however, so called in ancient records, from which it appears that it was a common gaol for felons, as early as 1218, and that so lately as 1457, Newgate, and not the Tower, was the prison for the nobility and great officers of state. Being much damaged by the fire of London, it was repaired and beautified by Sir Christopher Wren, in 1672. In one of the niches was a figure, representing Liberty with the word Libertas inscribed upon her cap and with a cat at her feet, in allusion to the story of Sir Richard Whittington, who bequeathed a sufficient sum to rebuild this gate, which was satisfactorily done by his executors in 1423.

After the taking down of the city gates, the corporation determined on erecting a new prison, and designs for the present building were prepared by the younger Mr. Dance; and the first stone was laid on the 23d of May, 1770, by the Lord Mayor (Alderman Beckford), who went in state, attended by the sheriffs and several of the aldermen. This was the last public transaction of Mr. Beckford, who died of a rheumatic fever, on the 21st of June following. In June, 1780, the riots known by the name of Lord George Gordon, or the “No popery” riots, lasted, to the eternal disgrace of the City magistracy of that day, for upwards of a week, and the new prison of Newgate was burned by the drunken incendiaries of the day. It was speedily repaired, and became the city and county prison. In 1733, the execution of criminals that had previously taken place at Tyburn, was removed by the proper authorities to the present spot, in front of this prison. The first execution took place on the 9th of December of that year.

Newgate is now the general felon’s prison for the City of London and the County of Middlesex. In the north east corner of the building, or that which is next Newgate Street, is the portion appropriated to those miserable criminals who are under sentence of death. The prison is under good management, but it is too limited in its space for its purposes, and, perhaps, if another felon’s prison was erected for the county, and the interior of this newly arranged for the city, it might be sufficient.

It is under the management of a special committee of the Court of Aldermen, and of a general committee, as to the expenses, consisting of the lord mayor, all the alder men, the chairman of the committees of City Lands, Thames Navigation, Coal and Corn, and general purposes, together with one common councilman for each ward; Mr. John Wontner, Keeper; the Rev. Horace S. Cotton, D.D., Ordinary.

NEWGATE MARKET, is situated in a quadrangle, between the south side of Newgate Street, the west side of Ivy Lane, the north side of Paternoster Row, and the east side of Warwick Lane, which is nearly 200 feet from east to west, and 150 from north to south, with a large market-house, and a clock and bell-turret in the centre, and capacious vaults and cellarage below. The houses that form the outside of the square, and the avenues that lead into Newgate Street, Ivy Lane, Paternoster Row and Warwick Lane, are mostly occupied by butchers, poulterers and salesmen, and the centre, by poulterers, fishmongers, fruiterers, greengrocers, buttermen, cheesemongers, dealers in tripe, and such like.

NEWGATE STREET, is the west continuation of Cheapside.

NEW GROVE, Mile End Road, is about two miles and a quarter from Aldgate.

NEW INN, THE, Wych Street, adjoins Clement’s Inn on the west, and is, like tha�???t, one of the Inns of Chancery. It was founded about 1485, for the students of an ancient Inn, formerly situated at the south east corner of Sea Coal Lane, Farringdon Street. When the Strand Inn was destroyed, with the Church of St. Mary-le-Strand, and other buildings, by the Protector Somerset, to make room for his new palace of Somerset House, the students removed hither, and united themselves to the society. New Inn is an appendage to the Middle Temple, and is governed by a treasurer and twelve ancients, who, with the other members, are to be in commons a week every term, or to compound for the same.

NEW INN BUILDINGS, Drury Lane, are a few houses on the right hand side of Wych Street, going from St. Clement’s Church, in the Strand.

NEW INN PASSAGE, Clare Market, is about ten houses on the right hand side of Houghton Street, from Newcastle Street.

NEW LANE, Horselydown, is in Shad Thames, opposite Horselydown New Stairs.

NEW PLACE, Poplar High Street, is part of the right hand side, about half a mile from the Commercial Road, below the Terrace.

NEW PRISON, THE, Clerkenwell, is situated on the eastern side of Gray’s Inn Lane Road, nearly opposite Guildford Street. It is the House of Correction for the County of Middlesex, built on the principles of John Howard; is considered to be a very useful specimen of the mode of classification and employment of prisoners, and is under the management and control of the sheriffs and a committee of magistrates.

NEW RIVER OFFICE, THE, is at the New River Head, Islington, near Sadler’s Wells Theatre. The New River was cut by Sir Hugh Middleton, and completed in 1613, for the purpose of supplying the metropolis with water. The source or head of this fine aqueduct is at Amwell, near Ware, in Hertfordshire, about twenty one miles from London, but by its windings is, by an exact admeasurement taken, by the late Robert Milne, Esq., in 1723, of the length of 38 miles, 3 quarters, and 16 poles. The Company have reservoirs at Pentonville and the Hampstead Road, and a steam engine in Upper Thames Street, to raise water from the Thames, on emergencies. It is under the management of Robert Percy Smith, Esq., Governor; John Jos. Holford, Esq., Deputy Governor; Charles Holford, Esq., Treasurer; Frederick Inglis, Esq., Chief Clerk and Secretary; William Chadwell Milne, Esq., Engineer.

NEW ROAD, Mary-le-bone, is the fine causeway from the Angel, at Islington, to the Yorkshire Stingo, Lisson Green.

NEW ROAD, Hans Town, is the first turning parallel to Sloane Street.

NEW ROAD, St. George’s in the East, is the continuation of Cable Street.

NEW SQUARE, Westminster, is the second turning on the left hand in Orchard Street, a few houses from Dean Street.

NEW SQUARE, Lincoln’s Inn. – [see Lincoln’s Inn, New Square]

NEW SQUARE, Minories, is about the middle of the west side, and leads into Vine Street, on the right hand.

NEW SQUARE, Shad Thames, is the broadest part of New Lane.

NEW STREET. – 1. is at Brompton, or Hans Town, the first street on the left hand going from Knightsbridge, along the Brompton High Street, or Road. – 2. is in Broad Street, Carnaby Market, or Golden Square, nearly opposite Poland Street. – 3. is in Spring Gardens, Charing Cross, on the right hand side leading to St. James’s Park. – 4. is in Covent Garden, the continuation of King Street. – 5. is in Baker Street. N�???orth, Mary-le-bone, about ten houses on the left hand from the New Road. – 6. GREAT, is in Fetter Lane, the first turning on the left hand in West Harding Street. – 7. LITTLE, is in Shoe Lane, the first street on the left hand from Fleet Street, and leads to Middle New Street. – 8. MIDDLE, is on the east side of Great New Street, Fetter Lane, it leads into Little New Street. – 9. is in Bowling Street, Clerkenwell, a few yards on the left hand from Turnmill Street. – 10. is in the City Road, about half a mile on the left hand from Finsbury Square. – 11. is the continuation of St. Mary Axe from Camomile Street. – 12. is in Bishopsgate Street, the second turning on the right hand leading to the India Company’s warehouses. – 13. is in Gibraltar Fields, Bethnal Green, the first turning parallel eastward to part of Turk Street. – 14. Fieldgate Street, Whitechapel, or Mile End Old Town, about ten houses on the right hand from Whitechapel Toad. – 15. is in Great Guildford Street, Southwark, the third turning on the right hand. – 16. is in Maze Pond, Southwark, at the east end, and right hand side of St. Thomas’s Street. – 17. is in the Blackfriars’ Road, the last turning on the left hand from Blackfriars’ Bridge. – 18. LITTLE, Borough Road, St. George’s Fields, is the second turning on the right hand from Stone’s End, going towards the Obelisk. – 19. Newington, or Kennington High Road, is opposite the second mile-stone from Cornhill. – 20. is about the middle of the north side of Adam Street, Rotherhithe. – 21. is in Neptune Street, Rotherhithe, the third turning on the left hand from Elephant Lane.

NEW STREET HILL, Shoe Lane, is the first turning on the left hand in Little New Street, going from Shoe Lane.

NEW STREET SQUARE. – 1. is in Great New Street, Fetter Lane, opposite Dean Street, and leads into Little New Street. – 2. is in Blackfriars., the continuation of Creed Lane. – 3. is in Old Street, St. Luke’s, the second turning eastward of the church. – 4. is in Aldersgate Street, the first turning on the right hand, about ten houses from Long Lane.

NEW TERRACE, Finsbury, is the row of houses on the west side of Tabernacle Walk.

NEW WALK, Horselydown, is the first turning on the left hand in Shad Thames, going from Dockhead.

NEW WAY, Westminster, is about twelve houses on the right hand side of Orchard Street, going from Dean Street.

NEW WAY, Southwark, is the first turning on the right hand in the Maze, going from Tooley Street.

NEWBY’S PLACE, Poplar High Street, or Road, is about half a mile on the left hand side going from the Commercial Road.

NEWCASTLE COURT, Strand, is a few houses on the right hand side going from Temple Bar.

NEWCASTLE COURT, College Hill, Upper Thames Street, is about five houses on the right hand going from Cloak Lane.

NEWCASTLE PLACE, Clerkenwell Close, forms part of the right hand side going from Clerkenwell Green.

NEWCASTLE ROW, Clerkenwell Close, is on the east side of Newcastle Place.

NEWCASTLE STREET, Strand, is at the back of St. Clement’s Church, and leads into Stanhope Street, Clare Market.

NEWCASTLE STREET, Clerkenwell Close, is the first turning on the right hand in St. James’s Street.

NEWFOUNDLAND AND BRITISH NORTH AMERICA SCHOOL SOCIETY, THE, is at No. 13, Salisbury Square. It was founded in 1783, for the benevolent purposes menti�???oned in its title. It is under the management of a committee, with J. Wells, Esq., M.P., Treasurer; J, Codner, and Perceval White, Esqrs., Secretaries,

NEWLY’S COURT, Mile End New Town, is the fourth turning on the right hand side of Pleasant Row, going from Pelham Street.

NEWMAN’S MEWS, Oxford Street, are three houses on the left hand side of Castle Street, going from Newman Street.

NEWMAN’S PASSAGE, Newman Street, is about twenty six houses on the right hand side going from No. 39, Oxford Street.

NEWMAN’S ROW, Bermondsey Street, is the second turning on the right hand side, going from the church towards Tooley Street.

NEWMAN’S ROW, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, is at the north east corner, about six houses on the left hand towards Great Turnstile.

NEWMAN STREET, Oxford Street, is nearly the fifth of a mile on the right hand from St. Giles’s.

NEWMAN’S YARD, Newman Street, Oxford Street, is about ten houses on the right hand side, going from Oxford Street.

NEWMARKET STREET, Wapping, is about a quarter of a mile on the left hand side, eastward of the church.

NEWNHAM PLACE, Bishopsgate Without, is about ten houses on the left hand, northward of Sun Street.

NEW PALACE YARD. – [see Palace Yard, New]

NEWPORT MARKET, Great Newport Street, is at the westward of that street, near Long Acre and St. Martin’s Lane.

NEWPORT STREET, GREAT, St. Martin’s Lane, Charing Cross, is the last turning on the left hand, opposite Long Acre.

NEWPORT STREET, LITTLE, is the west continuation of the preceding.

NEWPORT’S YARD, Old Street, St. Luke’s, is the first turning on the left hand going from Bunhill Row.

NEWTON STREET, High Holborn, is about a quarter of a mile on the left hand side, going from Farringdon Street.

NICHOLAS’S ALMS HOUSES, Monkwell Street. – [see Salters’ Company’s Alms Houses]

St. NICHOLAS ACONS, the Church of, stood formerly on the west side of Nicholas Lane, Lombard Street, and derived its name from its dedication to St. Nicholas, a citizen of Lycia, in Asia Minor, who was raised from a very humble situation to be Bishop of Myrea. The ancient church being destroyed by the fire of London, the parish was united to that of St. Edmund the King. – [see that church]

St. NICHOLAS ALL, Lombard Street, is on the west side of Nicholas Lane.

St. NICHOLAS COLE ABBEY, the Church of, is situated on the south side of Old Fish Street, Doctors’ Commons, and is dedicated to the same saint as the preceding. There was a church on the same site prior to 1377, when, according to Stowe, the steeple and south aisle were rebuilt. The church was destroyed by the great fire of 1666, and the present church built by Sir Christopher Wren. It is a handsome and well proportioned church, built of brick and stone, with rusticated angles, and stone architraves, and entablatures to the semi circular headed windows. Its tower is a specimen of Wren’s symmetry; but in the spire, where he has aimed at originality, he has scarcely escaped absurdity, if not ugliness. It was finished in 1677, and is the first church built and completed after the fire.

This church is a rectory, the advowson of which was anciently in the Dean and Chapter of St. Martin’s-le-Grand; but on the grant of that collegiate church to the Abbot and Canons of Westminster, the patronage devolved to that convent, in whom it continued till the dissolution of their monastery, when it devolved to the crown, in which patronage it is at present. After the great fire, the parish of St. Nicholas Olaves, [see that church] was united to this, which is a rectory of very ancient foundation, as Gilbert Foliot, Bishop of London, gave it to the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul’s, in 1172, in whose patronage it still continues.

The united rectory is in the city, diocese and archdeaconry of London, and the advowson is, from the before named union of the parishes, in the alternate gift of the Lord Chancellor, for the crown, and the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul’s. The present rector is the Rev. J. Mitchell, who was instituted by the Lord Chancellor in 1817.

St. NICHOLAS CHURCH YARD, Bread Street Hill, is about ten houses on the west side above Thames Street.

St. NICHOLAS OLAVE or OLYFF, the Church of, stood in the preceding churchyard, and derives its name from Olave, or Olaves, King of Norway. The old church was destroyed by the fire of London, and its parish united to that of St. Nicholas Cole Abbey. – [see that church]

St. NICHOLAS SHAMBLES, the Church of, stood formerly at the corner of Butcher Hall Lane, Newgate Street, and took its addition from standing in the Shambles, which before the fire of London extended along Newgate Street. The church, and all its ornaments, were given by Henry VIII. to the Mayor and Commonalty of London, towards the maintenance of the new parish church then erecting in the Gray Friars. – [see Gray Friars]

NICHOLAS LANE, Lombard Street, is the third turning on the right hand from the Mansion House, and extends from Lombard Street to Cannon Street.

NICOL’S ROW, Church Street, Bethnal Green, about one eighth of a mile on the left hand from Shoreditch.

NICOL’S SQUARE, Cripplegate, is on the north end of Castle Street, going from Falcon Square.

NICOL STREET, OLD, Bethnal Green, is the first turning parallel northward to part of Church Street.

NICOL STREET, NEW, Bethnal Green, is the first Street parallel northward to the preceding.

NICOL STREET, HALF, Bethnal Green. – [see Half Nicoll’s Street]

NIGHT LANE, St. Luke’s, is the continuation of Brick Lane.

NIGHTINGALE LANE, Upper East Smithfield, is facing the entrance to the London Docks.

NIGHTINGALE LANE, Limehouse, is in Fore Street, by the west end of Ropemaker’s Street.

NIXON SQUARE, Cripplegate, is at the west end of the crescent in Jewin Street, and behind the houses which form the north side of Jewin Street.

NOBLE STREET. – 1. is in Falcon Square, the north continuation of Foster Lane. – 2. is in Goswell Street, the second turning on the right hand from Old Street. – 3. is in Poplar, about half a mile on the right hand side going from Limehouse Church.

NOEL STREET, Berwick Street, Oxford Street, is about ten houses going from Oxford Street.

NOEL STREET, Bermondsey New Road, is the second turning on the left hand side going from the Bricklay�???ers’ Arms.

NORFOLK PLACE. – 1. is in Curtain Road, the third turning on the left hand from Old Street. – 2. LITTLE, the first turning on the right hand in the preceding. – 3. is in Church Street, on the west side of Norfolk Row. – 4. is in St. George’s Road, in St. George’s Fields. – 5. is in Salisbury Street, Bermondsey, or Rotherhithe. – 6. is in Church Street, Lambeth, about the middle of the south side.

NORFOLK STREET, Park Lane, is the first turning on the east side; it is sometimes called New Norfolk Street.

NORFOLK STREET, Middlesex Hospital, is the continuation of Newman Street, and leads to the New Road by Cleveland Street.

NORFOLK STREET, Strand, is about the sixth of a mile from Temple Bar. On this site stood anciently the palace of the Bishop of Bath, which became afterwards the town mansion of the Duke of Norfolk and Earl of Arundel, hence, the names of these streets.

NORFOLK STREET, NEW, Park Lane. – [see Norfolk Street]

NORFOLK STREET or PLACE, Kingsland Road, is a part of that road commencing about the sixth of a mile from Shoreditch Church.

NORFOLK STREET, LITTLE, Southwark, is the first turning on the right hand side of Guildford Street.

NORMAN BUILDINGS, City Road, is at the west end of Wenlock Street, by the Regent’s Canal.

NORMAN COURT, Wellclose Square, is in Cable Street, nearly opposite the north east passage to that square.

NORMAN STREET, St. Luke’s, is the continuation of Helmet Row.

NORRIS COURT. – 1. is in Nightingale Lane, the fourth turning on the left hand from the entrance to the London Docks. – 2. is in Snow’s Fields, Southwark, about a furlong on the right hand from Bermondsey Street.

NORRIS STREET, Haymarket, is about eighteen houses on the right hand side going from Piccadilly.

NORTH BANK, Regent’s Park, is a series of detached cottages and gardens on the northern bank of the Regent’s Canal, by Lisson Grove, North.

NORTH COURT, Berkeley Street, is about eight, houses on the left hand side of South Street, eastward of South Audley Street.

NORTH CRESCENT, Bedford Square. [see Crescent North]

NORTH EAST ALLEY or PASSAGE, Wellclose Square, is at the north east corner of the square.

NORTH GREEN, Holywell Mount, is about twelve houses on the left hand side of Worship Street, going from Paul Street, Finsbury.

NORTH MEWS, Tottenham Court Road, are about five houses on the right hand side of North Street, going from John Street.

NORTH MEWS, Gray’s Inn Lane, are a few yards up Little James Street, going from Gray’s Inn Lane.

NORTH PLACE. – 1. Gray’s Inn Lane, forms part of the west side. – 2. UPPER, is also in Gray’s Inn Lane, the north continuation of the preceding. – 3. is in Banner Street, St. Luke’s, near Whitecross Street. – 4. Bethnal Green, is the first turning parallel northward to part of Green Street. – 5. Lambeth, is nearly opposite the Asylum for Female Orphans.

NORTH ROW, Oxford Street or Grosvenor Square, is the first turning on the right hand in George Street.

NORTH ROW MEWS, North Row, Grosvenor Square, are about three houses eastward of Park Lane.

NORTH STREET. – 1. is in Hans Town, about six houses on the right hand in Sloane Street. – 2. is in Wood Street, Westminster, the first Street on the left hand. – 3. is in Manchester Square, between High Street and Manchester Street. – 4. is in Tottenham Court Road, behind Whitfield’s Chapel. – 5. OLD, Red Lion Square, is about the middle of the north side. – 6. NEW, Red Lion Square, is the continuation of the preceding to Boswell Court. – 7. is in Ropemaker Street, Finsbury, the second turning on the left hand. – 8. is in the City Road, the fourth turning on the right hand. – 9. is in Lamb Street, Spitalfields, about the sixth of a mile from Bishopsgate Street Without. – 10. is in Whitechapel Road, a few houses westward of Mile End Turnpike. – 11. is near the south end of Wilmot Street, Bethnal Green. – 12. is in Poplar, the first turning on the left hand in the High Street. – 13. is in Lambeth, about half a mile on the right hand from Westminster Bridge.

NORTHAM’S BUILDINGS, Somers Town, is the continuation of Phillip’s Buildings.

NORTHAMPTON BUILDINGS, Clerkenwell, is the second turning on the right hand side of Rosamond Street, going from Corporation Lane.

NORTHAMPTON PLACE. – 1. is in John Street, Clerkenwell, between Perceval Street and Corporation Row. – 2. is in the Hackney Road, about three quarters of a mile from Shoreditch Church.

NORTHAMPTON ROW, Clerkenwell, is parallel to part of the west side of Rosamond Street.

NORTHAMPTON STREET, Clerkenwell, is between St. John Street Road and Goswell Street Road. This square and adjacent streets, derive their name from the Marquess of Northampton, upon whose estate they are built.

NORTHAMPTON STREET, LOWER, Clerkenwell, is the first turning on the left hand side of King Street.

NORTHAMPTON TERRACE, City Road, is about three quarters of a mile on the left hand, going from Finsbury Square.

NORTHERN DISPENSARY, for the Relief of Poor Servants of Governors, and Delivery of Married Women, is at No. 9, Somers Place West, New Road, near St. Pancras new Church. It was established in 1810, in consequence of the great increase of houses and inhabitants in this district. Its present officers are, H.R.H. the Duke of Sussex, Patron; the Marquess of Lansdowne, President; five Vice Presidents; John I. Burn, Esq., Treasurer; Alexander Tweedie, M.D., and William Stroud, M.D., Physicians; P. M. Roget, M.D., Consulting Physician; D. D. Davis, M.D., Accoucheur; Frederick C. Skey, Esq., Surgeon; Mr. W. Seaton, Apothecary; and Mr. John Hawkes, No. 24, Mary Street, Hampstead road, Collector.

NORTHUMBERLAND ALLEY, Fenchurch Street, is about ten houses on the left hand side, going from Aldgate.

NORTHUMBERLAND COURT. – 1. is in the Strand, a few yards on the right hand from Charing Cross. – 2. is in Southampton Buildings, Holborn, about ten houses on the left hand from High Holborn. – 3. is in Compton Street, Clerkenwell, about fourteen houses on the left hand from Goswell Street. – 4. is in Northumberland Alley, Fenchurch Street, about the middle of the west side.

NORTHUMBERLAND HOUSE, the town mansion of the Duke of Northumberland, is situated at the south west corner of the Strand, opposite Charing Cross, and the south end of St. Martin’s Lane. It stands on the site of the ancient Hospital of St. Mary Rounceval, a cell to the priory of the sam�???e name, in Navarre, founded and endowed by the Earl of Pembroke, in the reign of Henry III. It was suppressed as an alien priory by Henry V., but re-founded in 1476, by Edward IV. After the suppression of all the religious houses by Henry VIII., it was granted by Edward VI., in 1549, with its appurtenances, to Sir Thomas Cawarden. It came afterwards into the possession of Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton, who in the reign of James I. erected three sides of the quadrangle, from the designs, and under the superintendence of Bernard Jansen, an eminent Flemish architect. According to Dr. Entick, however, an Englishman, of the name of Miles Glover, was the architect, as he infers from some initials about the front. After the death of the Earl it became the property of his relation, the Earl of Suffolk, and was then known by the name of Suffolk House.

In the reign of Charles I., Algernon, Earl of Northumberland, Lord High Admiral of England, married the daughter of Lord Suffolk, and about 1642 became its proprietor, and gave it the name of Northumberland House, which it has kept to this day.

Since that period it has been enlarged, the fourth side of the quadrangle added, and the other parts repaired by Inigo Jones: and about seven years ago it underwent a complete and substantial restoration under the superintendence of Samuel Ware, Esq.

It is one of the largest and most magnificent of the town mansions of our nobility, and contains a large collection of fine pictures and other valuable works of art. The pictures are by the Caracci, Guido, Rafaelle, Rubens, Salvator Rosa, Titian, Vandyke, and other great masters. Among these are the celebrated picture of the Cornaro Family, by Titian, which was sold by Vandyke to Algernon, Earl of Northumberland, in the reign of Charles I., for 1,000 guineas,

NORTHUMBERLAND MEWS, St. Mary-le-bone, are in Northumberland Street, New Road, to which street they are parallel, and are entered from Nottingham Street.

NORTHUMBERLAND PASSAGE, Strand, is about twelve houses on the left hand side of Northumberland Street, going from the Strand.

NORTHUMBERLAND STREET, Strand, the first turning on the left hand going towards Charing Cross; it extends to the Thames.

NORTHUMBERLAND STREET, Mary-le-bone, is about three quarters of a mile on the left hand side of the New Road.

NORTON FALGATE, the street so called is the north continuation of Bishopsgate Street Without, and extends to Shoreditch. It is also the name of a small liberty or manor, which belonged to the cathedral of St. Paul as early as the Conquest. This district being extra-parochial, the inhabitants support their own poor, and bury and marry where they please, but they mostly use a chapel, built by Sir George Wheeler, a Prebendary of Durham, for his tenant’s in Spitalfields. In this liberty there are also a small workhouse, a girl’s school, and a free school for boys.

NORTON STREET, Portland Place, is the first street parallel to the Portland Road.

NORWAY PLACE, Limehouse, forms part of the left hand side of the Commercial Road about a furlong from the church.

NORWAY STREET, Old Street, is the third turning on the right hand side going from Goswell Street.

NORWELL PLACE, Bethnal Green, is about half a mile on the left hand side of Church Street, going from Shoreditch.

NORWICH COURT. – 1. is in Fetter Lane, about sixteen houses on the right hand from Holborn Hill. – 2. is in Upper East Smithfield, nearly oppo�???site Butcher Row.

NORWICH UNION, THE, FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY’S OFFICE, is at No. 6, Crescent, Bridge Street, Blackfriars. This Company was originally established in Norwich, and has now a London Board and Office, as above, for insuring buildings, ships in port, harbour or dock, merchandize or effects, from loss or damage by fire, and has a distinct branch for life insurance. It is under the management of the Hon. Col. Wodehouse, M.P., Sir Jacob Astley, Bart., Thomas William Coke, Esq., M.P., and R. H. Gurney, Esq., Trustees; eleven Directors of whom John Browne, Esq., Ald. of Norwich, is President; and James Brown, Esq., Vice President. The London Board appointed for superintending the affairs of the London district, meet every Friday, at the Office, in Bridge Street, and consist of C. S. Onley, Esq., Chairman; J. Wright, Esq., and T. Angell, Esq., Committee; R. J. Bunyon, Esq., Secretary; Messrs. Bignold, Pulley and Mawe, Solicitors; Mr. Charles Howell, Surveyor of Buildings.

NOTTINGHAM COURT, Drury Lane, is the second turning on the left hand side of Short’s Gardens, going from Drury Lane.

NOTTINGHAM PLACE. – 1. is in the Kew Road, Mary-le-bone, about three quarters of a mile on the left hand side going from Tottenham Court Road. – 2. is in Mile End Old Town, the third turning on the left hand side going from Cannon Street Road.

NOTTINGHAM STREET, Mary-le-bone, is the first turning on the right hand going from the New Road.

NUN’S COURT, Coleman Street, is about six houses on the left hand going from London Wall.

NUTFORD PLACE, Bryanstone Square, is between that square and the New Road.

O

OAKLEY ROW, Bethnal Green, is about six houses on the left hand side of Thomas Street, going from Brick Lane.

OAKLEY STREET, Lambeth, is the third turning on the left hand side of the Westminster Bridge Road, going towards the Obelisk.

OAT LANE, Foster Lane, is the fourth turning on the left hand side, of Noble Street, going from Cheapside.

OATMEAL YARD, Tooley Street, is the last turning on the right hand side of Dog and Bear Yard, going from the east end of Tooley Street.

OBSERVER NEWSPAPER OFFICE, THE, is at No. 169, in the Strand, nearly opposite the New Church.

OCTAGON PLACE, Kennington Common, is on the west side, and forms the corner of the road, and leads to the green opposite the Horn’s Tavern.

ŒCONOMIC LIFE INSURANCE OFFICE. – [see Economic Life Office]

OFF ALLEY, Strand, is four houses on the left hand side of Villiers Street, going from the Strand. It is part of the original house and Gardens belonging to John Villiers, Duke of Buckingham. – [see York Buildings]

OFFERTORY, THE SCHOOL, Piccadilly, is two or three houses on the left hand side of Little Vine Street, going from Swallow Street. It derives its name, from being supported, under the superintendence of the rector and parish of St. James, Westminster, by the alms and contributions collected at the Offertory on Sacrament Sundays, which enables the trustees to establish and maintain a day school, where fifty boys are taught to read, write and cast accounts, according to the Madras system of education. They have also a new suit of clothes at Whitsuntide, every year. The admission of scholars is limited to t�??he sons of parishioners, who are educated for trades and handicrafts, to which, at the usual age, they are apprenticed.

OGLE STREET, Mary-le-bone, is a few small houses in Upper Ogle Street, a short distance on the left hand from Upper Mary-le-bone Street.

OGLE STREET, Mary-le-bone, is about six houses eastward of Titchfield Street, and extends from Foley Street to Mary-le-bone Street.

OGLE STREET, UPPER, Foley Street, is about six houses eastward of the preceding.

St. OLAVE, Hart Street, the Church of, is situated on the south side of Hart Street, Crutched Friars, and derives its name and addition, from being dedicated to St. Olave, or Olaus, King of Norway, who, from his strong attachment to the Christian religion, took part with the Christian English, against the Pagan Danes. A church stood on this site, dedicated to the same patron, before the year 1319. The present church is of considerable antiquity, and it escaped the ravages of the great fire of London. Since that time it has been often substantially repaired and beautified. This church is a rectory, the advowson of which has always been in private hands, and is now in the patronage of the parishioners. It is in the city, diocese and archdeaconry of London, and the present rector is the Rev. H. B. Owen, D.D., who was instituted by the parishioners in 1794.

St. OLAVE JEWRY, the Church of, stands on the west side of the Old Jewry, is of very ancient foundation, and was originally called St. Olave Upwell, from its patron saint, and the well at the east end in which a pump is now fixed. It was afterwards called Jewry, from its vicinity becoming the allotted residence of the Jews in London.

The parish is ancient, and was a rectory, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul’s, till about the year 1181, when it was transferred by them, with the chapel of St. Stephen, Coleman Street, to the prior and convent of Butley, in Suffolk, when it became a vicarage. At the suppression of the monasteries, the impropriation was forfeited to the crown, in whom it has continued till the present time. After the fire of London the parish of St. Martin Pomary, in Ironmonger Lane, was united to this parish, which being a rectory, also in the patronage of the crown, the presentation to the united livings is in the King. – [see St. Martin Pomary]

The ancient church was destroyed by the great fire of 1666, and the present one erected on its site for the united parishes by Sir Christopher Wren. It was began in 1673, and finished in 1676, and is a plain neat, church of brick, with stone dressings, to the doors and windows.

The united parishes are as before mentioned, a vicarage and rectory, in the patronage of the crown, and in the city, diocese and archdeaconry of London. Its present rector and vicar is the Rev. Robert Hamilton, D.D., who was instituted by the Lord Chancellor in 1797.

St. OLAVE, Silver Street, the Church of, was situated, before the fire of London, at the south west corner of Silver Street, Aldersgate, but being consumed by the fire of London, the parish was united by act of parliament to that of St. Alban, Wood Street (see that church), and the church was not rebuilt.

St. OLAVE, Southwark, the Church of, stands on the north side, and near the west end of Tooley Street It is mentioned as early as 1281, but on part of the old church falling in 1736, and the rest being in a ruinous and decayed condition, the parishioners applied to parliament for powers to rebuild it. Accordingly the ancient church was taken down in 1737, and the present structure, finished in 1739. It is�??? a plain substantial church, with rusticated angles, and a handsome cornice and balustrade by way of parapet. It gives its name by corruption of St. Olave’s to St. Oleys, and then Tooleys to the street in which it stands.

This parish is a rectory in the diocese of Winchester, in the county and archdeaconry of Surrey, and in the patronage of the Crown. The present rector is the Rev. A. H. Kenney, D.D., who was instituted by the King in 1822.

St. OLAVE’S STAIRS, Tooley Street, is about six houses on the left hand from the High Street.

OLD BAILEY, THE, Ludgate Hill, is the first turning on the left hand going from Farringdon Street towards St. Paul’s. Maitland and other antiquaries say, that it derives its name from Bale Hill, an eminence whereon was situated the Bale, or bailiff’s house, wherein he held a court for the trial of felons. This is somewhat corroborated by the fact that the place of security where the sheriffs keep the prisoners during the session, is still named the Bale Dock.

OLD BOND STREET. – [see Bond Street, Old, and so on for others called Old]

OLD BUILDINGS or SQUARE, Lincoln’s Inn. – [see Lincoln’s Inn, Old Square]

OLD CHANGE, THE, Cheapside, is about six houses on the right hand side going from St. Paul’s Churchyard. It derives its name from having been anciently the King’s Exchange, for receiving bullion in exchange for coin. It was then farmed to the citizens of London.

OLD JEWRY. – [see Jewry, The Old]

OLD PALACE YARD, Westminster, is by St. Margaret’s Lane, and is said to have been built by Edward the Confessor, but more probably by William Rufus, when he built his magnificent hall.

OLD STREET, St. Luke’s, is the second turning on the left hand side of the City Road, going from the north west corner of Finsbury Square. It begins at Goswell Street, opposite the Charter House wall, and extends eastward to the City Road. It derives its name from the Saxons, who called it Eald or Old, as being an ancient Roman military road.

OLD STREET ROAD, is the east continuation of the preceding towards Shoreditch Church.

OLD STREET SQUARE, St. Luke’s, is at the north end of Henry Street, Old Street.

OLIVER COURT, Westminster, is about five houses on the left hand side of Bowling Street, going from the west end of Wood Street.

ONE SWAN YARD, Bishopsgate Without, is a few houses on the left hand side, northward of the church.

ONE TUN COURT, Strand, is about twenty-four houses on the right hand from Charing Cross.

ONSLOW STREET, Clerkenwell, is the first turning on the left hand in Vine Street, going from Mutton Lane.

OPERA HOUSE, Haymarket. – [see King’s Theatre, The]

OPTHALMIC, THE, LONDON INFIRMARY, Finsbury. – [see London Opthalmic Infirmary, The]

ORANGE COURT. – 1. is in Swallow Street, Carnaby Market. – 2. is in Castle Street, Leicester Square, the first turning northward of the King’s Mews. – 3. is in Drury Lane, five houses northward of Princes Street. – 4. is in Rose Street, Soho, three or four houses on the right hand from Crown Street. – 5. is in Old Nicol Street, Bethnal Green, the first turning on the left from Cross Street. – 6. is in�??? Wapping Street, about twenty-three houses on the left below Hermitage Bridge. – 7. is in Fieldgate Street, Mile End Old Town, the first turning on the left hand from Whitechapel Road.

ORANGE ROW, Newington, forms part of the west side of the Kennington Road, by the Plough and Harrow, extending towards the Common.

ORANGE STREET. – 1. is in Leicester Square, parallel to the south side of the square, and extends from St. Martin’s Street to Castle Street. – 2. is in Red Lion Square, at the north, west corner, and extends into King Street, Bloomsbury Square. – 3. is in Lomonds Pond, Southwark, the first turning on the left hand in Gravel Lane.

ORCHARD STREET. – 1. is in Portman Square, at the south east corner, and extends to Oxford Street – 2. is in Westminster, the first turning on the right in Dean Street. – 3. is in St. Luke’s, the north continuation of Ironmonger Row.

ORDNANCE OFFICE, THE, CIVIL DEPARTMENT OF, is at No. 91, Pall Mall, opposite George Street, and the MILITARY DEPARTMENT is in the Tower, the first turning or entrance on the right hand going from St. Katherine’s.

This department of government is under the management of — —, Master General; — —, Surveyor General, and other officers, whose names, when the arrangements now in progress are completed, maybe found in Burke’s Official Kalendar, and either of the Red Books.

ORMOND MEWS, Queen Square, are at three houses up Great Ormond Street, going from the south east corner of Queen Square.

ORMOND PLACE, Queen Square, extends from Great Ormond Street into Lamb’s Conduit Street.

ORMOND STREET, GREAT, Lamb’s Conduit Street, is the fifth coach turning on the left hand going from High Holborn.

ORMOND STREET, LITTLE, Queen Square, is opposite the preceding, and leads into Southampton Row.

ORMOND STREET, NEW, Lamb’s Conduit Street, is the fifth turning on the right hand from High Holborn.

ORMOND YARD. – 1. is on the south side of Great Ormond Street aforesaid. – 2. is in York Street, St. James’s Square, about four houses on the left hand from the north side of the square.

ORPHAN ASYLUM, THE LONDON, Clapton. – [see Asylum, The London Orphan]

ORPHAN ADULT INSTITUTION, Regent’s Park. – [see Adult Orphan Institution]

ORPHAN CLERGY, St. John’s Wood. [see Sons of the Clergy, Corporation of]

ORPHAN FEMALE ASYLUM, Westminster Bridge Road. – [see Asylum for Female Orphans]

ORPHAN MERCHANT SEAMEN’S ASYLUM. – [see Asylum for the Orphans of Merchant Seamen]

ORPHAN WORKING SCHOOL, THE, is situated on the left hand side of the City Road, just after passing the bridge and basin of the Regent’s Canal, going towards Islington. It is a large handsome brick edifice, consisting of a centre and two wings, with a cupola over the former part of the building. In the front is inscribed on a stone string course, “The Orphans Working School, for the maintenance and instruction of orphans, and other necessitous children supported by voluntary contributions, erected 1773.”

This school was established in 1759 and was at first conducted at a house in Hoxton, where twenty boys were at first admitted, and as soon as its funds p�???ermitted, twenty girls were added. As subscriptions increased, the managers or committee purchased a piece of freehold ground, and erected the above mentioned substantial school, which has conveniences for baking, brewing, and washing, for air, exercise, and recreation. There is also a chapel, dining rooms, dormitories, work rooms, and other necessary apartments. A very full and interesting account of this excellent charity may be found in Mr. Highmore’s Pietas Londinensis. Its present officers are, Ebenezer Maitland, Esq., President; Henry Waymouth, Esq., Treasurer; Wm. Lister, M.D., Physician; Martin Ware, Esq., Surgeon; Mr. W. Broackes, Apothecary; James Smith, Esq., Secretary; Mr. James Harrison, Collector; Mr. John Philkins, Master.

ORTON’S BUILDINGS, Southwark, is the last turning on the left hand in Castle Street, going from Redcross Street.

OSBORNE PLACE, Whitechapel, is the second turning on the right hand in Osborne Street, going from opposite Whitechapel Church.

OSBORNE STREET, Whitechapel High Street, is nearly opposite the church, and is continued by Brick Lane.

OSNABURGH PLACE, New Road, is a turning in Osnaburgh Street.

OSNABURGH STREET, Regent’s Park, turns out of the north side of the New Road, on the eastern side of Trinity Church, opposite Portland Road.

OSNABURGH ROW, Pimlico, is the first turning on the right hand in the King’s road, going from Upper Eaton Street.

OSNABURGH TERRACE, Regent’s Park, is at the back of Trinity Church, and leads from Osnaburgh Street to Albany Street.

OSSULSTON STREET, Somers Town, is the continuation of Willsted Street, and extends into Phoenix Street.

OVAL, THE, Kennington, is at the south end of Bowling Green Row, entering opposite the Horns Tavern.

OWEN’S ALMS HOUSES, Islington Road, founded by Lady Owen in 1609, are situated on the east side of the road going from the City Road. They consist of ten separate single apartments, with a small garden behind for each alms-woman, and a court in front. They are under the management of the Brewers Company. – [see that company]

OWEN’S COURT, Goswell Street Road, is the first turning on the left hand in Owen’s Court, going from Rawstorne Street.

OWEN’S PLACE, Goswell Street Road, is part of the west side of the road adjoining Owen’s Row.

OWENS ROW, Goswell Street Road, is the first turning on the right hand from the City Road, or Islington. These derive their name as being on property left by the above named Lady Owen to the Brewers Company, for various charitable uses.

OXENDON STREET CHAPEL, Haymarket, is at four houses on the right hand side of Oxendon Street, going from Coventry Street, and is an episcopal chapel of the Church of England.

OXENDON STREET, Haymarket, is about six houses on the left hand side of James Street, going from the Haymarket; it extends into Coventry Street.

OXFORD ARMS PASSAGE, Warwick Lane, is between the Inn Yard and Warwick Lane.

OXFORD BUILDINGS, Oxford Street, are between New Bond Street and South Molton Street, and lead into Woodstock Street.

OXFORD COURT. – 1. is in Oxford Street. – 2. is in Camomile Street. – 3. is in Salters’ Hall Court, St. Swithin’s Lane, Cannon S�???treet. In this court was anciently the house of the Prior of Torrington, in Suffolk, which afterwards fell to the Earls of Oxford; but that edifice being demolished, and this court built in its room, it retained the name of its former possessor.

OXFORD MARKET, Oxford Street, is about half a mile on the right hand side going from St. Giles’s Church. It derives its name from being on the estate of a former Earl of Oxford.

OXFORD STREET, commences at St. Giles’s, and extends westward to Connaught Terrace, and the southern end of the Edgware Road. This street, with the market and court of the same name, are all so called from being on the estate of the above named former Earl of Oxford.

OXLEY PLACE, Dockhead, turns off at No. 3, Parker’s Row.

P

PACKER BUILDINGS, Temple, is the third turning on the right hand in Mitre Court, going from Fleet Street.

PACKER COURT. – 1. is in Still Alley, Houndsditch. – 2. is in Coleman Street, two or three houses from Lothbury.

PACKINGTON’S, LADY, ALMS HOUSES, Whitefriars, were founded and endowed by Lady Anne Packington, and left to the charge of the Clothworkers’ Company.

PADDINGTON STREET, Mary-le-bone, is the second turning on the right hand side of High Street, going from the New Road.

PAGE’S WALK, Bermondsey, is the first turning on the right hand in the Grange Road, going from Bermondsey New Road.

PAINTER’S BUILDINGS, Curtain Road, are a few yards on the left hand side of Norfolk Place, going from the Curtain Road.

PAINTERS COURT, St. James Street, is about five houses on the right hand side of Bury Street, going from Jermyn Street.

PAINTER STAINERS HALL, Little Trinity Lane, is about nine houses on the left hand side going from Upper Thames Street. It is a handsome convenient building, with a spacious hall for the meetings of the livery. The ceiling of this room is painted with allegorical subjects by Fuller, and is further embellished with pictures by Palmatier, Brull and Hungis. There are also portraits of Charles II. and his Queen, by Houseman; of Camden, the civic historian and antiquary; shipping by Monami, and other fine paintings. Camden gave to this company a valuable silver cup and cover, which they use every St. Luke’s Day, at their annual election, on which is engraved, “Gul. Camdenus Clarencieux Filius Sampsonis Pictoris Londinensis, Dono Dedit.”

The Company of Painter Stainers was incorporated by letters patent of Queen Elizabeth in 1582, by the name of “the Masters, Wardens and Commonalty of the Freemen of the Art and Mystery of Painting, called Painter Stainers, within the City of London.” This company have several excellent charities under their administration; among which, are one of Thomas Evans, whose bust adorns the court room, and who left in 1687 a munificent bequest; John Stock, Esq., of Hampstead, also left in 1780 a handsome bequest; Mrs. Jane Shank, also in 1795 several pensions to blind persons, and other charitable donations.

PAINTER’S RENTS, Ratcliffe, are about a quarter of a mile on the left hand side of Broad Street, going from Shadwell Church.

PALACE ROW, Tottenham Court Road, is part of the north side of that thoroughfare, reaching from the Hampstead Road towards the Turnpike.

PALACE STREET, Westminste�??r, is the continuation of Charlotte Street, going from Pimlico.

PALACE YARD, NEW, Westminster, is behind the houses which form the east side of Bridge Street, extending to Westminster Hall.

PALACE YARD, OLD, Westminster, is the open space on the south side of Westminster Hall, by the Abbey.

PALL MALL, St. James’s, is at the south end of the Haymarket, near the Opera House, and extends to St. James’s Palace. It is named from having been formerly a mall for a game so called.

PALL MALL COURT, St. James’s, is about the middle of the south side of Pall Mall.

PALL MALL EAST, is a new street, recently formed from the eastward of Pall Mall to the portico of St. Martin’s Church.

PALMER’S ALMS HOUSES, Westminster, are in Tothill Fields, and were founded by James Palmer, B.D., in 1654, for twelve poor persons, and a school for twenty boys, with a chapel for the use of both, in which the founder preached and did duty in his life time.

PALMER’S RENTS, Southwark, are the third turning on the left hand in Snow’s Fields, going from Bermondsey Street.

PALMER’S VILLAGE, Westminster, is about half a mile from Buckingham Gate.

PALSGRAVE COURT, Strand, is about twelve houses on the left hand beyond Temple Bar.

PANCRAS LANE, Cheapside, is about eight houses on the left hand side of Queen Street, going from Cheapside.

PANCRAS PLACE, Tottenham Court Road, is the first turning on the left hand side of Pancras Street, going from the said road.

St. PANCRAS PLACE, St. Pancras, forms part of the row on the right hand side of the road.

PANCRAS STREET, Tottenham Court Road, is about half a mile on the right hand side, going from St. Giles’s.

St. PANCRAS IN THE FIELDS, the old Church of, is situated on the north side of the road leading from King’s Cross, Battle Bridge, to Kentish Town. The parish is of great extent, including one third of the hamlet of Highgate, and the whole of the hamlets of Kentish Town, Camden Town, Somers Town and Pentonville. It extends to the south end of Gray’s Inn Lane, and includes the streets westward of it to Cleveland Street and Rathbone Place. The new church of this parish is a very handsome elaborate structure, on the south side of the New Road, erected from the designs of Mr. Inwood, with a beautiful portico of the Ionic order, copied from the Eryetheium at Athens, and two side porticoes of Caryatides.

This parish is a vicarage in the county of Middlesex, in the diocese of London, a peculiar of the Archbishopric of Canterbury, and in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul’s. The present vicar is the Rev. James Moore, L.L.D. There are also two parish chapels, which are both curacies in the patronage of the vicar, one called the parish chapel, the curate of which is the Rev. J. Fallowfield, and the other is the Rev. William Harness.

St. PANCRAS, the Church of, stood before the fire of London, on the north side of St. Pancras Lane, Queen Street, Cheapside, but was united by act of parliament to that of St. Mary-le-Bow (see that church) and not rebuilt.

PANNIER ALLEY, Newgate Street, is about eight houses on the left hand side, going from Cheapside; it leads into Paternoster Row. It is said to be the highest ground within the City. About the middle of�??? the alley is a stone fixed in the wall with a sculpture representing a boy sitting on a pannier, under which is inscribed:-

When you have sought the city round,
Yet still this is the highest ground.

PANORAMA, THE, Leicester Square, is at the north east corner of the square, and is the first building and picture of the kind ever erected and painted in London. It has two pictures, the admission to each of which is one shilling.

PANORAMA, THE, Strand, is nearly opposite the new church, and has a similar circular picture to the preceding.

PAN’S HEAD COURT, Swallow Street, is about three houses on the left hand side of Leicester Square, going from Swallow Street, towards Warwick Street.

PANTHEON, THE, Oxford Street, is a dilapidated building, erected by the late James Wyatt, Esq., which, from being the resort of the first rate nobility, is now in a state of desertion.

PANTON SQUARE, Haymarket, is about the middle of the north side of Coventry Street.

PANTON STREET, Haymarket, is the first turning on the left hand going from Coventry Street.

PAPER BUILDINGS, Temple, is on the west side of King’s Bench Walk. They were originally built in 1607, but being consumed by fire, were rebuilt in 1685.

PARADISE BUILDINGS, Lambeth Upper Marsh, are a few houses on the left hand side, going from the Marsh Gate.

PARADISE COURT. – 1. is in Paradise Street, Battle Bridge, St. Pancras, the first turning on the right hand from Britannia Street. – 2. is at the south end of Gravel Lane, Christchurch, by the Falcon Glass Works.

PARADISE PLACE. – 1. is in Paradise Street, Mary-le-bone. – 2 is in Tabernacle Place, Finsbury Square. – 3. is in Lambeth Upper Marsh. – 4. is in Paradise Row, Rotherhithe.

PARADISE ROW. – 1. is in Chelsea, on the south west side of the Hospital. – 2. is in Palmer’s Village, Westminster. – 3. is on the north, side of the Small Pox Hospital, King’s Cross, St. Pancras. – 4. is on the west side of Bethnal Green. – 5. is in Charles Street, Old Gravel Lane. – 6. is on the south east corner of Ratcliffe Square, near Butcher Row. – 7. is in High Street, Lambeth, a few houses from the church, and extends to Lambeth Walk. – 8. is in Gravel Lane, Southwark, nearly opposite Lomon’s Pond. – 9. extends from Lucas Street, Rotherhithe, to Deptford Lower Road.

PARADISE STREET. – 1. is in High Street, Mary-le-bone, the third turning on the left hand going from Charles Street, Manchester Square. – 2. is in Britannia Street, St. Pancras. – 3. is in Paul Street, Finsbury Square. – 4. is the first south parallel to part of Rotherhithe Street towards Deptford Lower Road.

PARADISE WALK, Paradise Row, Chelsea, and leads towards the Thames.

PARAGON, Kent Road, is a few houses westward of the Turnpike, by the Bricklayers’ Arms.

PARAGON MEWS, Kent Road, is at the back of the houses which form the west side of the Paragon.

PARAGON PLACE, Kent Road, forms part of the south side, adjoining both ends of the Paragon.

PARDON CHURCH, was formerly at the east end of the Bishop of London’s Palace in St. Paul’s Churchyard, in a place called Pardon Church Haugh.

PARDON COURT, St. John Street, Clerkenwell, a few yards on the right from Pardon Passage.

PARDON PASSAGE, St. John Street, Clerkenwell, is about a quarter of a mile on the right hand side going from Smithfield.

PARISH CLERKS’ HALL, is in Wood Street, Cheapside. The company was incorporated by letters patent of Henry III. in 1223, by the name of “The Fraternity of St. Nicholas,” by which title they were known till re-incorporated by James I. in 1611, which was confirmed by Charles I. in 1636, by the name of “The Master, Wardens and Fellowship of Parish Clerks of London, Westminster, Borough of Southwark and fifteen out parishes.”

PARISH STREET, Tooley Street, the last turning on the right hand side going from London Bridge.

PARK’S or PARKER’S COURT, Whitechapel High Street, is about sixteen houses eastward of Red Lion Street.

PARK CRESCENT, Portland Place, is at the northern end opposite the Regent’s Park.

PARK LANE, Piccadilly, is the second turning on the left hand side going from Hyde Park Corner.

PARK LANE, Mary-le-bone, the first turning westward of Baker Street, North.

PARK PLACE. – 1. is the continuation of Baker Street, North, Mary-le-bone, from the New Road. – 2. is in Knightsbridge, on the east side of the barracks. – 3. in St. James’s Street, the second turning on the right hand from Piccadilly. – 4. is in the Regent’s Park. – 5. is in Carlisle Lane, Lambeth, the last turning on the left hand from the Marsh Gate. – 6. is part of the High Road by Kennington Cross.

PARK ROAD, Regent’s Park, is on the north side of that park.

PARK SQUARE, Portland Place, is the large square on the north side of the New Road, opposite Park Crescent.

PARK STREET, Grosvenor Square, is the second turning on the right hand from Tyburn Turnpike.

PARK STREET. – 1. is in Westminster, at the north end of Cartwright Street. – 2. is in Baker Street, North, Mary-le-bone, and extends from New Street to Park Place. – 3. is nearly opposite Kennington Lane. – 4. is on the west side of the Borough Market.

PARK TERRACE, Regent’s Park, is at the back of Sussex Place.

PARKER’S LANE, Drury Lane, is the first turning on the right hand in Little Queen Street.

PARKER’S LANE SCHOOL, is situated in the preceding, and was founded in 1663 by Mr. Wm. Skelton, of St. Giles’s in the Fields, for the education of fifty poor boys, thirty five of whom are to be of the parish of St. Giles’s in the Fields, ten of St. Martin’s, and five of St. Paul’s, Covent Garden.

PARKER’S ROW, Bermondsey, is the first turning on the right hand side going from Dockhead.

PARKER’S YARD, Little Bartholomew Close, West Smithfield, is three houses south from New Street.

PARLIAMENT COURT, Artillery Lane or Street, Bishopsgate Without, is the second turning on the right.

PARLIAMENT OFFICE, THE, is at No. 28, Abingdon Street, Westminster,

PARLIAMENT PLACE, Westminster, is in Old Palace Yard, at the corner of Abingdon Street; it leads to the Thames.

PARLIAMENT STREET, Westminster, is the continu�???ation of Whitehall on the left, about a quarter of a mile from Charing Cross.

PARLIAMENT STREET, St. George’s Fields, is on the south east side of St. George’s Market, near the London Road.

PARMITER’S SCHOOL, Bethnal Green. – [see Bethnal Green Alms Houses and Schools]

PARROT ALLEY, Whitecross Street, is in Playhouse Yard.

PARR’S BUILDINGS, Grosvenor Square, are about eight houses on the left hand side of North Row, going from North Audley Street.

PARSONS COURT, Bride Lane, is a short distance on the left hand side going from Bridge Street, Blackfriars.

PARSON’S STREET, Upper East Smithfield, is the continuation of that street to Ratcliffe Highway.

PARSONAGE ROW, Newington Road, is part of the west side of the High Road opposite Cross Street.

PARSONAGE WALK, Newington High Road, is the first turning on the right hand from the Elephant and Castle.

PARTRIDGE COURT, Hounsditch, is about the middle of the left hand side from opposite Bishopsgate Church.

PASFIELD’S RENTS, Rotherhithe, are the second and third turnings on the left hand side of Paradise Street, going from Mill Pond Bridge.

PASSING ALLEY, St. John’s Street, Clerkenwell, is about one fifth of a mile on the left hand going from Smithfield.

PATENT OFFICE, No. 4, Lincoln’s Inn Old Square; the hours of attendance are 10 to 4.

PATERNOSTER ROW, St. Paul’s Churchyard, is the first turning on the right hand in Ave Maria Lane; from which it extends into Cheapside. It derives its name from being anciently the residence of numerous stationers or writers who resided there before the invention of the art of printing, and wrote for sale, alphabets, paternosters, creeds, graces, &c.

PATERNOSTER ROW, Spitalfields, is the east continuation of Union Street.

PATERNOSTER ROW, LITTLE, Spitalfields, is about four houses on the right hand in the preceding, going from Union Street.

PATIENCE STREET, Spitalfields, is three or four houses in Wheeler Street, southward of Anchor Street, near Webb Square.

PATRIOT ROW, Bethnal Green, adjoins Patriot Square, and extends towards the green.

PATRIOT SQUARE, Bethnal Green, is the first turning on the right hand going from the green.

PATRIOT STREET, St. George’s in the East, is a few houses on the right hand side of James Street, going from Cannon Street Road.

PATY’S COURT, Shoreditch, is the second turning on the left hand side of Holywell Lane, going from High Street.

PAUL’S ALLEY, Cripplegate, is about ten houses southward of Barbican, leading to Aldersgate Street.

St. PAUL’S ALLEY, St. Paul’s Churchyard, is about the middle of the north side.

PAUL’S BAKEHOUSE COURT, Doctors’ Commons, is about six houses on the right hand side of Godliman Street, going from St. Paul’s Churchyard.

St. PAUL’S CATHEDRAL, is the most magnificent Protestant Church in Europe, and was built by Sir Christopher Wren, after the fire of London, on the �???site of the ancient cathedral, and on which had been formerly a Roman temple. This cathedral flourished exceedingly during the Saxon heptarchy, and was splendidly endowed by various royal and noble benefactors. It underwent a substantial repair in the reign of James I., under the superintendance of Inigo Jones, who added to it the incongruity of one of the finest Corinthian porticoes of modem times. It was destroyed by the great fire of 1666, and the present edifice erected in its stead. The history and description of this Cathedral, which would occupy too great a space for the limited nature of this work, maybe found in every work that treats of the metropolis.

It is the metropolitan Church of London, and the cathedral of the see. The present prelates and clergy of this cathedral are, the Right Hon. and Right Rev. Charles James Bloomfield, D.D., Lord Bishop of London, Provisional Dean of Canterbury, and Dean of the Chapel Royal, &c. &c. who was consecrated Bishop of Chester in 1824, and translated to London in 1828; Edward, Lord Bishop of Llanaff, Dean, 1827; the Rev. Richard Richardson, D.D., Chancellor, 1792; the Rev. Charles Almeric Belli, M.A., Precentor, 1819; the Rev. Hugh Chambers Jones, M.A. Treasurer, 1816; the Ven. Joseph Holden Pott, M.A., Archdeacon of London, 1814; the Rev. Thomas Hughes, D.D., Consumpta per Mare, 1807; F. W. Blomberg, D.D., Wedland, 1822; and Robert James, Bishop of Chichester, Neasden, 1827) Canons residentiary. The Rev. W. Gibson, M.A., Chamberlainewood, 1781; Archdeacon Nares, M.A., Istington, 1793; Robert Watts, M.A., Eald Street, 1797; Archdeacon Parkinson, D.D., Chiswick, 1798; Thomas Briggs, M.A., Newington, 1800; the Dean of Winchester, D.D., Harleston, 1802; Thomas Wintle, B.D., Wilsden, 1805; George Seeker, M.A., Brownswood, 1807; William Wood, B.D., Coddington Minor, 1810; Richard Lendon, M.A., Oxgate, 1812; Thomas Randolph, M.A., Cantlers, 1812; W. S. Goddard, D.D., Reculverland, 1814; the Bishop of Carlisle, D.D., Finsbury, 1816; A. R. Chauvel, B.C.L., Pancras, 1817; Samuel Birch, D.D., Twyford, 1810; John H. Randolph, M.A., Eadland, 1822; Archdeacon Pott, M.A., Mora, 1822; John Sleath, D.D., Rugmere, 1822; Thomas Gaisford, M. A., Caddington Major; John Davison, B.D., Sneating; Archdeacon Watson, D.D., Brondesbury, 1825; Hubert Oakeley, M.A., Wenlocks Barn, 1825; Jonathan Tyers Barrett, D.D., Mapesbury, 1825; H. Handley Norris, M.A., Holborn, 1825; C. E. J. Dering, M.A., Tottenham, 1827: Charles Wordsworth, M.A., Portpool, 1828, Prebendaries; and the Rev. Henry Fly, D.D., Sub Dean and First Canonry, 1783; Henry John Knapp, M.A., Second Ditto, 1817; William Holmes, M.A., Third Ditto, 1796; Richard Harris Barham, B.A., Fourth Ditto, 1821; William John Hall, M.A., Fifth Ditto, 1825; James William Vivian, D.D., Sixth Ditto, 1816; Richard Webb, M.A., Seventh Ditto, 1799; Theophilus Lane, M.A., Eighth Ditto, 1824; R. C. Packman, B.A., Ninth Ditto, 1822; E. G. A. Beckwith, M.A., Tenth Ditto, 1826; Edward James Beckwith, M.A., Eleventh Ditto, 1797; Christopher Pache, M.A., Twelfth Ditto, 1817, Minor Canons.

In 1673, Wren commenced preparations for the new building, and submitted various designs for the inspection of the King and the commissioners. He also made the beautiful model, which is still preserved in an apartment over the Morning Prayer chapel of the cathedral, a plan of which, engraved by Lowry, is given in my Life of Wren. This plan was deservedly a favourite with its author, and is in many respects superior to the one that is executed. The present one is said to have been constructed on the Roman Catholic cathedral plan, through the influence of the king’s brother, James, Duke of York, who wished to have it ready for the revival of the Popish service. The architect, it is said, shed tears at its rejection, and complied with the royal mandate with regret.

On the 12th of November 1673, Wren received the appointme�???nt of architect to, and one of the commissioners for the rebuilding of the cathedral Church of St. Paul. In the beginning of 1675, the works were commenced, and his skilful and scientific master mason, Thomas Strong, made his first contract, with the commissioners. By the end of the year the designs were approved, received the signature of the King, and the commissioners; and the architect was allowed to make such variation and improvements as he pleased. The work of destroying the ruins of the ancient structure was also commenced, first by exploding with gun powder, then by the use of the battering ram.

The first stone of the new cathedral was laid on the 21st of June 1675, by the architect and his lodge of Freemasons. The trowel and mallet used on this occasion are still preserved in the Lodge of Antiquity, of which Sir Christopher was Master. In 1678, Compton, Bishop of London, issued an address, exhorting all persons to contribute with liberality towards this national undertaking, and his exhortation was eminently successful.

In 1678 the architect set out the piers and pendentives of the great cupola, when the oft told incident occurred of his accidentally lifting a fragment of a tomb stone, with the word ‘resurgam’ inscribed upon it.

After the death of Charles II. his successor, James II. issued a new commission to continue the works, dated February 6, 1684, that of Charles having become voided, his death. In this instrument the name of the architect was introduced, as before, and the works proceeded with unabated activity. By the latter end of April 1685, the walls of the choir, with its aisles, being 170 feet long, and 120 feet broad, with the stupendous arched vaults of its crypt were finished, as also the new chapter house and vestries. The two beautiful circular porticoes of the transepts, which are among the masterpieces of modern architecture, were also brought to the same height, and were all built of large blocks of Portland stone.

In June 1688, the year of our glorious revolution, the building of the cathedral had advanced so far, that the commissioners announced that they had contracted for the timber for roofing the aisles of the choir, which were now ready to receive them. The choir was reported to be finished in 1694, as for as the stone work, and the scaffolding was struck. In the course of the following year, Wren published his friend, Robert Bayles, Discourse against customary Swearing, and affixed an order from himself and his brother commissioners, against such an abuse of language by the workmen employed in and about St. Paul’s.

On the 2nd of December 1696, the choir of the new cathedral was opened for divine service on the day of the public thanks giving for the peace of Ryswick, and the Bishop of Salisbury (Gilbert Burnet) preached before the King and a numerous court.

On February 1, 1699, the beautiful chapel, at the north west portion of the cathedral, now called and used as the Morning Prayer chapel, was opened for divine service, with appropriate ceremony, and in 1708 the general works of the cathedral had proceeded so near towards completion, that on the 23rd of February that year, Sir Humphrey Mackworth, brought up from the committee to the House of Commons, a report as to the covering of the cupola, and laid several estimates for it, before the House of Commons. In 1710, when Sir Christopher had attained the 78th year of his age, the highest stone of the lantern upon the cupola, was laid by his eldest son, Christopher, attended by their Lodge of Freemasons, and with due ceremony. In this year, the celebrated controversy began, about the frauds and abuses at St. Paul’s, over which the architect so completely triumphed, and in 1718, in the 86th year of his age, and in the 49th of his office as Surveyor Ge�???neral of the Public Buildings, was this great man displaced from his office to make room for an intriguer of the name of Benson, who has been consigned by Pope, to the most distinguished honours of the Dunciad.

The cathedral was left almost untouched till the reign of George III., when Robert Mylne was appointed its conservating architect, and since then C. R. Cockerell, Esq., A.R.A., who has so scientifically restored the ball and cross.

St. PAUL’S CHAIN, St. Paul’s Churchyard, is a small street about fifteen houses on the right hand from Ludgate Street and extends to Doctors’ Commons.

St. PAUL’S CHURCH YARD, is the area round the cathedral of St. Paul, with the newly built school of St. Paul at the eastern end.

St. PAUL’S COLLEGE, is in a small court, near the Deanery, in St. Paul’s Churchyard, about three houses on the left hand side, going to Ludgate Hill from St. Paul’s Chain. It consists of tenements appropriated to the Minor Canons of the cathedral, who were incorporated by letters patent in the 18th of Richard II.

St. PAUL, Covent Garden, The Church of, is situated on the western side of Covent Garden Market, and was erected by the Earl of Bedford, as a chapel of ease to St. Martin’s in the Fields, for the convenience of his neighbouring tenantry, which were then much on the increase. It is in the form of a Vitruvian Tuscan temple, and was designed by Inigo Jones. In 1633, as appears from a manuscript in the Harleian collection at the British Museum, printed in the Gentleman’s Magazine of November, 1789, a dispute had arisen between the above named earl and the vicar of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, relative to the right of patronage to this newly built church, and that it was heard before the Privy Council, who determined that it should be a chapel of ease to St. Martin’s, till an act of parliament should be passed to make it parochial. It was then consecrated by Juxon, Bishop of London, on the 27th of September, 1828.

In 1645, the precinct of Covent Garden was separated from the parish of St. Martin, and made parochial, by an ordinance of the Lords and Commons, sitting at Westminster; but, being considered an illegal ordinance, an act of parliament was obtained immediately after the restoration of Charles II., in 1660, by which the patronage was vested in the Earl of Bedford and his heirs for ever.

The church was built by Inigo Jones, by direction of the earl, as a mere barn, to which the architect replied that it should be the handsomest barn in Europe. The walls were of brick, but were cased with stone about the year 1788 and with other repairs cost £11,000. In 1795, the roof and interior was consumed by fire, which have been since substantially repaired and reinstated by the late Thomas Hardwick, Esq.

By the before mentioned act, the patron has the privilege of nominating one of the churchwardens, the rector another and the parishioners elect a third. The church is by the same authority a rectory, in the county and archdeaconry of Middlesex, in the diocese of London, and in the patronage of the Duke of Bedford. The present rector is the Rev. F. Randolph. D.D., Prebendary of Bristol, and Vicar of Banwell, who was instituted in 1817

St. PAUL’S SCHOOL, is situated at the eastern end of St. Paul’s Cathedral, and was founded in 1610, by Dean Colet. It was destroyed by the great fire of 1666, and rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren. This building, being found too small, was taken down, and the present handsome and substantial edifice built, from the designs and under the superintendence of George Smith, Esq. in 1824. It is under the entire management of the Mercers Com�???pany, who have much improved the revenues of its estates, and its present masters are, the Rev. John Sleath, D.D., F.R.S. and F.S.A., a Prebendary of St. Paul’s, and Chaplain in Ordinary to the King, High Master; the Rev. William A. G. Durham, M.A., Sub Master; the Rev. J. P. Bean, M.A., Chaplain and Third Master; the Rev. James Cooper, M.A., Fourth Master.

St. PAUL, Shadwell, the Church of, is on the south side of Shadwell High Street, or Upper Shadwell, between Shakspeare’s Walk and Fox’s Lane. It owes its origin to the vast increase of buildings on that side of the Thames, for though it is new completely joined to London, it was formerly a hamlet belonging to Stepney; but owing to the increase of inhabitants, Thomas Neale erected the present church in 1656, for their accommodation; and, in 1669, this district was constituted by act of parliament into a distinct parish.

It is a rectory, in the county of Middlesex, in the diocese of London, exempt from archidiaconal visitation, and in the patronage of the Dean of St. Paul’s. The present incumbent is the Rev. Charles Webb Le Bas, Prebendary of Lincoln, and Vicar of Darfield, who was instituted in 1812.

PAUL’S COURT, Wood Street, Cheapside, is about three houses on the left hand side of Huggin Lane, going from Wood Street.

PAUL SQUARE, Finsbury Square, is the first turning on the right hand side of Paul Street, going from Worship Street.

PAUL STREET, Finsbury Square, is the continuation of Wilson Street, going from the north side of the square.

PAUL’S HEAD COURT, Fenchurch Street, is nearly opposite Rood Lane.

PAVED ALLEY. – 1. is in Pall Mall, about six houses on the left hand from St. James’s Street. – 2. is in Paternoster Row, about six houses from Warwick Lane. – 3. is in Leadenhall Market, on the north side of it.

PAVEMENT, THE, Finsbury, is on the west side, and extends from Moorgate to Finsbury Place.

PAY OFFICE FOR THE ARMY, is at the Horse Guards, Whitehall, under the superintendence of a paymaster general, a deputy, an accountant general, and other officers, which, owing to the present change of ministry, we cannot give correctly. – [see Army Pay Office]

PAY OFFICE FOR THE NAVY, Somerset Place. – [see Navy Pay Office]

PEACOCK ALLEY, Southwark, is the second turning on the left hand side of Morgan’s Lane, going from Tooley Street.

PEACOCK PLACE, Minories, is two houses southward of Haydon Street.

PEACOCK STREET, Newington High Street, or Road, is a few houses from the church going towards Kennington.

PEARL ROW, Blackfriars’ Road, is the last turning on the left hand side going from the Bridge.

PEARL STREET, GREAT, Spitalfields, is the continuation of Flower-de-Lis Street.

PEARL STREET, LITTLE, Spitalfields, is the continuation of Vine Street.

PEARSONS ALLEY, Lambeth, is the first turning on the left hand side of High Street, from opposite the church.

PEARTREE COURT. – 1. is in Clerkenwell Close, a few houses on the left hand from the church. – 2. is in Coppice Row, the first turning on the right hand from Clerkenwell Green. – 3. is in Shoreditch High Street, nearly opposite the church.

�???PEARTREE ROW, Lambeth Marsh, is about halfway between the Blackfriars’ Road, and the Westminster Bridge Road.

PEARTREE STREET, Lambeth Marsh, is behind Peartree Row.

PEAR STREET or PEARTREE STREET, Westminster, is the west continuation of Old Pye Street.

PEARTREE STREET, Goswell Street, is the third turning on the right hand from Old Street.

PECULIAR OF ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY’S OFFICE, is in Bell Yard. Doctors’ Commons. The Worshipful J. H. Arnold, D.C.L., Vicar General; C. Hodgson, Esq., Secretary; W. Abbott, Esq., Registrar.

PEDLER’S ACRE, Lambeth, is a few yards on the left hand going from the foot of Westminster Bridge. – [see St. Mary, Lambeth]

PEERLESS PLACE, City Road, is part of the west side of the High Road between the Lying-in Hospital and Peerless Row.

PEERLESS POOL, City Road, is on the west side of Peerless Place, and was formerly a spring that, overflowing its bounds, caused a dangerous pond, which, from the number of persons who lost their lives there, was called Perilous Pool. It was partly filled up till 1743, when a person of the name of Kemp, cleansed it, and converted it into a very complete swimming bath. The projector wisely changed its obnoxious title of Perilous into Peerless Pool.

PEERLESS ROW, City Road, is the first turning on the left hand from Old Street.

PELHAM STREET, Spitalfields, is about the middle of the east side of Bride Lane.

PELICAN COURT, Little Britain is two houses on the left hand from Blue Coat Buildings.

PELICAN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY’S OFFICES, are at No. 70, Lombard Street, and in Spring Gardens. It is an emanation from the Phoenix Office, and was established in 1797. It is under the management of Sir Charles Flower, Bart, and thirteen other Directors; and Thomas Parke, Esq., Secretary.

PELICAN STAIRS, Wapping Wall, are near Foxes Lane, Shadwell Church.

PELL PLACE, Ratcliffe Highway, is about five houses on the left hand, going from Ship Alley, Wellclose Square.

PEMBERTON ROW, Gough Square, Fleet Street, is at the north west corner of the square, and extends westward’ towards Fetter Lane.

PENITENTIARY, THE, LONDON FEMALE, Pentonville. – [see London Female Penitentiary]

PENITENTIARY, THE, GENERAL, Millbank, is a large establishment for the Reformation and Employment of Persons convicted of Minor Offences, situated between Millbank Street, Westminster, and Vauxhall Bridge. It is under the superintendence of a committee appointed by the King in Council, and its present officers are, Robert Auld, Esq., Secretary; Mr. Benjamin Chapman, Governor; the Rev. John T. Grant, Chaplain; James Wade, Esq., Surgeon; Anthony White, Esq., Medical Superintendent; Mr. Jordison White, Master Manufacturer, and other minor officers.

PENNINGTON STREET, Ratcliffe Highway, is situated between part of the Highway and the London Docks.

PENNY FIELDS, Poplar, is on the north side of the High Street, near the Commercial Road.

PENSON PLACE, is about a furlong eastward of Limehouse Church.

PENTON GROVE, Pentonville, is about a furlong from High Street, Islington.

PENTON PLACE, Pentonville, is nearly opposite the chapel in the High Street.

PENTON STREET, Pentonville, is the second turning on the right hand side, going from the Angel at Islington.

PENTONVILLE, is a large district on the northern side of the City, situated on an eminence between Islington and Battle Bridge. It is in the parish of St. James’s, Clerkenwell, to which it has a neat chapel of ease, on the north side of the road.

PEPPER STREET, Southwark, is the first turning on the left hand side of Duke Street, going from the west end of Queen Street.

PERCIVAL STREET, Clerkenwell, is the last turning on the right hand side of St. John Street Road, going from Smithfield, and derives its name from the family of the Earl of Northampton upon whose estate it is situated.

PERCY MEWS, Rathbone Place, are about three houses on the right hand side, going from Percy Street towards Oxford Street.

PERCY STREET, Tottenham Court Road, is nearly opposite Bedford Street.

PERIWINKLE COURT, Ratcliffe, is the first turning on the right hand side of Periwinkle Street, going from Brook Street.

PERIWINKLE STREET, Ratcliffe, is in Brook Street, nearly opposite Butcher Row, going from Ratcliffe Cross.

PERKINS’S RENTS, Westminster, are about the middle of the north side of Peter Street.

PERRY’S PLACE, Oxford Street, is the third turning on the right hand going from St. Giles’s.

PERRY’S RENTS, St. George’s in the East, is the continuation of John’s Rents in Old Gravel Lane.

PESTHOUSE ROW, St. Luke’s is at the west end of St. Luke’s Hospital, and derives its name from being the site of the City Pest House, which was erected as a Lazaretto for the reception of diseased and miserable objects, and remained till 1737

St. PETER’S ALLEY, Cornhill, is the last turning on the right hand going from the Mansion House.

St. PETER, Cornhill, the Church of, is situated near the south east corner of Cornhill, and is of very ancient foundation, being given in 1298 by William Kingston to his tenement in Grass Street. The old church was destroyed by the fire of London, and the present substantial edifice erected in its stead by Sir Christopher Wren. The spire is surmounted by a ball, upon which is a vane in the form of a key, the ancient emblem of St. Peter.

This church is a rectory, the patronage of which was anciently in the family of the Nevils; one of whom Lady Alice, relict of Sir Hugh Nevil, made a feoffment thereof in 1362, to Richard, Earl of Arundel and Surrey. Alter passing through various hands, it was conveyed in 1411 by Sir Richard Whittington, and others, to the Lord Mayor and Commonalty of the city of London, in whom the advowson still continues. It is in the city, diocese and archdeaconry of London, and the present rector is the Rev. John Page Wood, who was instituted in 1824.

St. PETER CHEAP, the Church of, stood, before the fire of London, at the corner of Wood Street, Cheapside; but being a small parish it was united to that of St. Matthew, Friday Street, (see that church) and not rebuilt.

St. PETER’S HOSPITAL, Newington, Surrey. – [see Fishmonger’s Alms Houses]

St. PETER-LE-POOR, the Church of,�??? is situated on the western side of Old Broad Street, nearly opposite the south corner of the Excise Office. This church is of very ancient origin, as appears from a register of it, so far back as 1181. It is dedicated to St. Peter the Apostle, and was called le-poor, as Stowe thinks, from the poor and mean condition of its inhabitants in ancient times. It is a very handsome modern church, built by Jesse Gibson, Esq., in 1791.

The advowson of this church appears to have been, from the earliest times, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul’s, with whom it still continues.

It is a rectory, in the city, diocese and archdeaconry of London, and its present Rector is the Rev. James Simkinson, who was instituted in 1792.

St. PETER, Paul’s Wharf, the Church of, stood anciently at the south east corner of St. Peter’s Hill in Upper Thames Street, but after its destruction by the fire of London it was united to the parish of St. Bennet, Paul’s Wharf, (see that church) by act of parliament, and the church was not rebuilt.

St. PETER AD VINCULA, the Church of, is situated within the Tower of London, at the north west corner of Northumberland Walk, near the New Armoury. It is dedicated to St. Peter, when in chains or bonds, and was built and founded by Edward I. It is a plain Gothic building, sixty six feet in length, fifty-four in breadth, and twenty-four feet high. The advowson is a rectory, in the city, diocese and archdeaconry of London, exempt from archiepiscopal jurisdiction, and in the gift of the Crown. The present rector is the Rev. Andrew Irvine, M.A., who, as Chaplain to the Tower, is paid by the patron.

This church is remarkable for being the burial place of the following royal and noble personages, who were executed either in the Tower, or on Tower Hill, namely:- John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, beheaded on Tower Hill, June 22, 1535; George Bullen, Lord Rochford, beheaded May 17, 1536; Anne Bulleyn, Queen of Henry VIII., beheaded May 19, in the same year; Thomas Cromwell, Earl of Essex, beheaded in 1540; Catherine Howard, Queen of Henry V III., beheaded February 13, 1541; Thomas Seymour, Baron Dudley and Lord High Admiral, beheaded in 1549, by a warrant from his own brother, the Protector Somerset, who, in less than three years, was executed on the same scaffold. The said Edward Seymour, Duke of Somerset, beheaded January 24, 1552; John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland, beheaded August 22, 1553; Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, the favourite of Queen Elizabeth, beheaded February 25, 1602; James Scott, Duke of Monmouth, son of Charles II., beheaded July 15, 1685, for asserting his right to the Crown, against James II.; the Earl of Kilmallock and Lord Balmerino, beheaded August 18, 1746, for being concerned in the Rebellion in Scotland; and Simon Fraser, Lord Lovatt, convicted of the same crime, and executed in the following year.

St. PETER, Westminster. – [see Westminster Abbey]

PETER’S COURT, Rosemary Lane, is about the sixth of a mile on the right hand, going from the Minories.

St. PETER’S HILL, Doctors’ Commons, is about a quarter of a mile on the left hand side of Upper Thames Street, going from Blackfriars’ Bridge.

St. PETERS LANE, West Smithfield, is the third turning on the left hand in St. John Street, going from Smithfield.

PETER STREET. – 1. is in Redcross Street, Southwark, near the Mint – 2. LITTLE, is in Westminster, the continuation of Wood Street. – 3. GREAT, is the continuation of the preceding. – 4. NEW, is in Great Peter Street. – 5. is in Wardour Street, Soho, th�???e fourth turning on the right hand from Oxford Street. – 6. is in Bloomsbury, the continuation of Bow Street from opposite Drury Lane. – 7. is in Great Saffron Hill, about a quarter of a mile from Holborn Bridge. – 8. is in Sun Street, Bishopsgate, the first turning on the left hand towards Moorfields. – 9. is in Mount Street, Bethnal Green, the first turning on the right hand from Church Street.

PETERBOROUGH COURT, Fleet Street, is the fifth turning on the right hand side going from Farringdon Street.

PETTICOAT LANE, Spitalfields, or Whitechapel, is about the fifth of a mile on the left hand from Aldgate Pump. It is now called Middlesex Street. On both sides of that now wretched and filthy street, were anciently hedges and rows of elm trees, and the pleasantness of the neighbouring fields, induced many gentlemen to build their houses here. Among others, was Gondomar, the Spanish Ambassador; but owing to the influx of the French Refugees, in the reign of Louis XIV., it became the residence of the lowest classes of their weavers; and since that of Jews of various descriptions.

PETTICOAT SQUARE, Petticoat Lane, is about the sixth of a mile from Aldgate High Street.

PETTY’S COURT, Hanway Street, Oxford Street, is about six houses on the left hand from it.

PETTY BAG OFFICE, THE, is in Roll’s Yard, Chancery Lane. The duties of this office, are to make out patents, congés d’elire, summonses to the nobility, and others to parliament, &c. It derives its name from each record being deposited in a little bag. The hours of attendance are from 10 to 2, and from 5 to 8.

PETTYFORD COURT, Drury Lane, is about three or four houses on the right hand from the Strand.

PEWTERERS’ HALL, is at No. 17, on the west side of Lime Street, and is a neat convenient building. In the court room is a portrait of Sir William Smallwood, who was master of the company in the reign of Henry VII., and gave them their hall, with a garden, and six houses adjoining.

The Pewterers’ Company, were incorporated by letters patent of the 13th Edward IV., A.D. 1474, by the title of “The Master, Wardens and Commonalty of the Art and Mystery of Pewterers of the City of London.” It is the sixteenth in rotation of the city companies.

PHEASANT COURT, Bishopsgate, is at the back of Angel Alley, near Sun Street.

PHIL’S BUILDINGS, Houndsditch, are nearly opposite St. Mary Axe.

PHILANTHROPIC SOCIETY, THE, St. George’s Fields, is on the right hand side of the London Road, going from the Obelisk. It was established in 1798, for the prevention of crime, and the reform of the criminal poor, by the encouragement of industry and the culture of good morals among those children who are training up in vicious courses. The first place of reception was at a small house on Cambridge Heath; but the prosperous encouragement which it received, enabled the directors to contract with the corporation of London, for a piece of ground in St. George’s Fields, where the present buildings and chapel were erected.

The present officers are, the Duke of Leeds, President; twelve Vice Presidents; Samuel Bosanquet, Treasurer; the Rev. William Pace, M.A., Chaplain; the Rev. Isaac Jackman, M.A., the Rev. Edward Rice, M.A., and the Rev. John B. Deane, M.A., Alternate Preachers; George Birkbeck, M. D., Physician; Thomas Callaway, Esq., Surgeon; Mr. H. Sterry, Apothecary; R. Collier, Superintendent; Thomas Russell, Steward; Mrs. Bryer, Matron.

PHILLIP’S COURT, Golden Lane, Cripplegate, is three houses on the right hand side of Brackley Street.

PHILLIP LANE, London Wall, is between Wood Street and Aldermanbury.

PHILLIPS ROW, Tottenham Court Road, forms part of the south side of the New Road.

PHILLIP’S STREET, St. George’s in the East, is the first turning on the right hand side of Charles Street, going from Lower Cornwall Street.

PHILOLOGICAL SOCIETY, THE, was founded in 1792, under the patronage of the late Duke of York, for the education of the sons of clergymen, officers, professional men, merchants, clerks in public offices, and the higher order of tradesmen, who, from misfortunes, cannot afford a liberal education for their children. It is held in Gloucester Place, New Road, and its present officers are, the King, Patron; Lord Teignmouth, President; twelve Vice Presidents; John Turner, Esq., Treasurer; Mr. Edwin Abbott, Secretary, and Head Master; Alp. E. Phillipe, French Master; J. Meredith, Writing Master; John Whitehead, Collector.

PHILPOT LANE, Fenchurch Street, is the first turning on the right hand side going from Gracechurch Street.

PHIPP’S COURT, Holywell Mount, is the first turning on the left hand side of Phipp’s Street, going from Chapel Street.

PHIPPS STREET, Holywell Mount, is the first turning on the right hand side of Chapel Street, going from the Curtain Road.

PHOENIX ALLEY, Long Acre, is nearly opposite Hanover Street.

PHOENIX COURT. – 1. is in West Street, Smithfield, a few doors on the left hand. – 2. is in Newgate Street, four houses on the left hand from the Old Bailey. – 3. is in the Old Change, opposite Little Carter Lane.

PHOENIX FIRE OFFICE, THE, is an insurance company that was established by the sugar bakers of the metropolis in 1782, for insuring property at home and abroad from fire. It is under the management of Sir William Curtis, Bart., and twenty other Directors; Jenkins Jones, Esq., Secretary.

PHOENIX PLACE. – 1. is in Ratcliffe, and is part of the north side by the Phoenix Tavern. – 2. is in Phoenix Street, Somers Town, between Ossulston Street and Middlesex Street.

PHOENIX ROW, Blackfriars’ Road, is about half a mile on the right hand side going from the bridge.

PHOENIX STREET. – 1. is in Crown Street, St. Giles. – 2. is the first turning on the left hand in Plumbtree Street, St. Giles. – 3. is in Somers Town, at the south east corner of Clarendon Square.

PHOENIX YARD, Oxford Street, is about two thirds of a mile on the right hand from St. Giles’s.

PHYSICIANS, COLLEGE OF, Pall Mall East. – [see College of Physicians]

PICCADILLY, is a large street so called, which extends from the north end of the Haymarket to Hyde Park Corner, and derives its name from being the place were formerly the Piccadilly or Spanish ruffles were sold. – [see Burlington House]

PICKERING’S PLACE, St. James’s Street, is four houses on the right hand from the palace.

PICKETT STREET, Strand, forms part of the right hand side beginning near Temple Bar, and leads towards St. Clement’s Church.

PICKLE HERRING STAIRS, Horselydown, is at the nort�???h end of Vine Yard.

PIDCOCK’S BUILDINGS, St. George’s Fields, is a few yards on the left hand side of the Borough Road, going from Stone’s End.

PIG ALLEY, Spitalfields, is the first turning on the right hand side of Wheeler Street, going from Lamb Street.

PIGEON COURT, Long Alley, Finsbury, is the first turning on the left hand side of Angel Alley, going from Long Alley.

PILGRIM STREET, Ludgate Street, is the second tuning on the left hand going from St. Paul’s Churchyard.

PIMLICO, is a district of Westminster, that commences at Buckingham Gate, and extends to Chelsea.

PIMLICO, Hoxton, is about a quarter of a mile on the left hand side going from Old Street Road.

PIMLICO GARDENS, Hoxton, are on the south side of the preceding.

PINE APPLE COURT, Westminster, is the third turning on the right hand side of Castle Lane, going from York Street

PINK’S ROW, City Road, is the first turning on the right hand side of Ratcliffe Row, going from Bath Street.

PINNER COURT. – 1. is in Gray’s Inn Lane, a short distance, on the right hand from Middle Row, Holborn. – 2. is in Old Broad Street, nearly opposite the Excise Office.

PIPEMAKER’S ALLEY. – 1. is in Bedfordbury, about the middle of the east side. – 2. is in Old Montague Street, Whitechapel, the first turning on the left hand from Osborn Street. – 3. is in White Horse Street, Ratcliffe, a few yards from the Commercial Road. – 4. is in Narrow Street, Limehouse. – 5. is in the Maze, Southwark, the last tuning on the right hand from Tooley Street.

PINMAKERS’ HALL, Pinner’s Court, Broad Street, has been for a long time let out by the company as a dissenting Meeting House. It is on part of the ancient Priory of the Augustine, or Austin Friars. The Pinmakers Company was incorporated by Charles I. in 1636 by the name of “The Master, Wardens, Assistants and Commonalty in the Art or Mystery of Pinmakers of the City of London.” It stands the sixty-eighth in the list of livery companies.

PITCHER’S COURT, Coleman Street, is the continuation of White’s Alley, and leads into Little Bell Alley.

PITFIELD STREET, Hoxton, is the first turning on the left hand going from the City Road in Old Street Road.

PITT’S COURT, Spitalfields, is three houses southward of Crispin Street from Union Street.

PITT’S PLACE, Southwark, is at the north end of William’s Court, Maid Lane, Bankside.

PITT’S PLACE, Kent Road, is nearly opposite the Bricklayers’ Arms.

PITT STREET. – 1. is in the Kent Road, the first turning on the right hand below the Bricklayers’ Arms. – 2. is in Prospect Place, St. George’s Fields, the second turning on the left hand from the Elephant and Castle. – 3. is in the Blackfriars’ Road, the first turning northward of Surrey Chapel. – 4. is in Charlotte Street, Rathbone Place, a few houses north from Goodge Street.

PITTMAN’S BUILDINGS, St. Luke’s, is the continuation of Ironmongers’ Row.

PITTMAN’S PLACE, Bermondsey, is near the west end of Jamaica Row.

PLAISTERERS’ HALL, Addle Street, Wood Stree�???t, Cheapside, is a substantial, convenient building, erected after the fire of London.

The Plaisterers’ Company was incorporated by letters patent granted by Henry VIII. In 1501, and confirmed by a charter of Charles II. in 1667, in the name of “The Master and Wardens of the Guild or Fraternity of the Blessed Mary, of Plaisterers, London.” It is the forty-sixth in rotation of the city companies.

PLAND’S BUILDINGS, Bell Alley, Goswell Street, a few yards on the left hand from Goswell Street.

PLANTATION OFFICE, Whitehall. – [see Board of Council]

PLATINA STREET, Finsbury, is between Castle Street and Paradise Street, Tabernacle Walk.

PLAYHOUSE YARD. – 1. is in St. Luke’s, about the middle of the west side of Whitecross Street. – 2. is in Water Lane, Blackfriars, on the south side of Apothecaries’ Hall.

PLOUGH ALLEY. – 1. is in Barbican, near the middle of the north side. – 2. is in Wapping Street, about fifty houses on the left hand below Hermitage Bridge.

PLOUGH COURT. – 1. is in Carey Street, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, on the left hand side going from Chancery Lane. – 2. is in Gray’s Inn Lane, on the right hand going from Middle Row, Holborn – 3. is in Fetter Lane, on the right hand from Middle Row, Holborn. – 4. is on Holborn Hill, a few houses from Farringdon Street. – 5. is in Lombard Street, about five houses on the left hand from Gracechurch Street.

PLOUGH STREET, Whitechapel High Street, is about fourteen houses on the right hand eastward of Red Lion Street.

PLOUGH YARD. – 1. is in Shoreditch High Street, and extends from Rose Yard to King’s Head Court – 2. is in Seething Lane, Tower Street, the second turning on the left hand. – 3. is in Bermondsey Street, about twelve houses northward of Russell Street.

PLOUGH AND HARROW YARD, Southwark, is in Kent Street, near Bicknel’s Rents.

PLUMBERS’ or PLUMMERS’ BUILDINGS, Bethnal Green Road, is at the south end of Wilmot Street, behind the Lamb public house.

PLUMBERS’ or PLUMMBRS’ COURT, High Holborn, is five houses east of Kingsgate Street.

PLUMBERS’ HALL, Great Bush Lane, Cannon Street, is a recently built substantial brick building.

The Company was incorporated by James I., in 1611, by the name of “The Master, Wardens and Commonalty of the mystery of Plumbers of the City of London.” It is the thirty-first in rotation of the Livery Companies.

PLUMBER’S ROW. – 1. is in Mile End Old Town, and extends to the Commercial Road. – 2. is in the City Road, opposite Peerless Place.

PLUMBER’S STREET, City Road, is nearly opposite Fountain Place.

PLUMB TREE COURT, Holborn Hill, is three houses on the left hand going from Farringdon Street.

PLUMB TREE STREET, Bloomsbury, is about twenty houses on the right hand side of Broad Street, going from the west end of Holborn.

POET’S CORNER, Westminster, is adjoining the south side of the Abbey. – [see Westminster Abbey]

POINTER’S BUILDINGS. – 1. is in Old Street Road, about five or six houses from Shoreditch Church. – 2. is in Shoreditch, the continuation of French Alley.

POLAND STREET, Oxford Street, is about one third of a mile from St. Giles’s.

POLEN or POLLEN STREET, Hanover Square, is about six houses on the right hand side of Hanover Street, going from the south east corner of the square.

POLICE OFFICES, THE, various, are at present as follow, namely. – I. The Metropolitan Police Office, is at No. 4, Whitehall Place; Lieut. Col. Charles Rowen and Richard Mayne, Esq., Commissioners; John Wray, Receiver. – II. Bow Street, Covent Garden; Sir Richard Birnie, Chief Magistrate; George Rowland Minshull and Thomas Halls, Esqs., Magistrates; Messrs. J. Stafford, William Woods and William F. Leadly, Clerks; John Townsend, John Sayers and six other Officers; John Day, Conductor of the Horse Patrol Establishment; Home Department, Whitehall and No. 8, Cannon Row, Westminster; J. Stafford, Conductor of the Foot Patrol Establishment at this Office. – III. Great Marlborough Street; Henry Moreton Dyer, John Edward Conant and Frederick Adair Roe, Esqs., Magistrates; J. Fitzpatrick, First Clerk; William Bishop, Second Clerk. – IV. Hatton Garden; John Baker Sellon, Allan Stewart Laing and William L. Rogers, Esqs., Magistrates; Thomas Mallet, First Clerk; R. Edwards, Second Clerk. – V. Worship Street, Shoreditch; William Bennett, Samuel Twyford and Richard E. Broughton, Esqs., Magistrates; William Rentage, First Clerk; Robert Bayles, Second Clerk. – VI. Lambeth Street, Whitechapel; Matthew Wyatt, John Hardwick and Thomas Walker, Esqs., Magistrates; William Osman, First Clerk; H. B. Gunning, Second Clerk. – VII. High Street, Mary-le-bone; Edmund Griffith, William Hoskins and John Rawlinson, Esqs., Magistrates; John James Mallet, First Clerk; Henry Philips, Second Clerk. – VIII. Queen Square, Westminster; William A. A. White, David W. Gregorie and George W. Marriott, Esqs., Magistrates; Ralph Blackston, First Clerk; John P. Perry, Second Clerk. – IX. Union Hall, Southwark; Robert Joseph Chambers, Maurice Swabey and Joseph Terry Hone, Esqs., Magistrates; Richard Staples, First Clerk; William D. Burnaby, Second Clerk. – X. The Thames Police Office, No. 259, Wapping Street; Thomas Richbell, William Ballantine and William Broderip, Esqs., Magistrates; Edward Symons, First Clerk; James Fell, Second Clerk; and James Evans, Principal Surveyor; Thomas Venables, Receiver of Police, Home Department, Whitehall, and No. 4, Halkin Street, Grosvenor Place. – XI. The Mansion House; the Lord Mayor or his Locum Tenens, Chief Magistrate; Francis Hobler, Esq., Clerk; Mr. Robert Harris, Assistant Clerk. – XII. The Guildhall, King Street, Cheapside; the various Aldermen, according to their rota, Magistrates; William Beresford, Esq., Clerk; Mr. William Payne, Assistant Clerk. – XIII. The Borough Court, Southwark; John Holmes, Esq., High Bailiff; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Steward; John Newman, Esq., Prothonotary; W. E. Burnaby, Esq., and the Hon. Charles Ewan Law, Counsel; Mr. John Law, Keeper of the Compter. – XIV. The Justice Room, Town Hall, Southwark; Alderman Joshua Jonathan Smith, Justice of the Bridge Ward, and Sitting Alderman for Southwark; John Newman, Esq., Clerk; Mr. Joseph Weald, Hall-keeper. – XV. Whitechapel Court; — —, Steward; R.W. S. Fanner, Esq., Prothonotary; Philip Keys, Esq., Counsel.

POLLARD’S ROW, Bethnal Green Road, is the first turning westward of Wilmot Square.

POLYGON, THE, Somers Town, is a polygonal mass of buildings in the centre of Clarendon Square (which see).

POND YARD, Bankside, Southwark, is a few houses on the right hand side of Mosses Alley, going from Maid Lane.

PONDERS COURT, Cripplegate, is the second turning on the right hand side of Butler’s Alley, going from Milton Street.

PONTYPOOL PLACE, St. George’s Fields, is the second turning on the right hand side of Webber Street, going from the north side of the Magdalen Hospital, Blackfriars’ Road.

PONTYPOOL ROW or COURT, St. George’s Fields, is a few yards on the right hand side of Pontypool Place, going from Webber Street.

POOL’S BUILDINGS, Coldbath Fields, is the third turning on the right hand side.

POPE’S HEAD ALLEY, Cornhill, is opposite the Royal Exchange.

POPE’S HEAD COURT. – 1. is in Temple Bar, about eighteen houses on the right hand side of Bell Yard, going from Fleet Street. – 2. is in Quaker Street, Spitalfields, is about four houses on the right hand side, going from Wheeler Street.

POPE’S HILL, Shadwell High Street, is the fourth turning on the right hand side eastward of the church.

POPLAR, was formerly a hamlet in the parish of Stepney, but has been recently made a parish. It commences at the Commercial Road and extends to Blackwall, and derives its name from the number of poplar trees that formerly grew here. The chapel of Poplar was erected about 1664, when the ground upon which it was built, together with the burial ground were given by the East India Company, and the building erected by subscription. Since that a very handsome new parish church has been built by the side of the East India Road.

The living is a chapelry in the county, of Middlesex, in the diocese of London, exempt from archidiaconal jurisdiction and in the alternate patronage of the East India Company as founders of the chapelry, and of Brasenose College, Oxford, as patrons of the original parish. The present incumbent is the Rev. Samuel Hoole, M.A.

POPLAR ROW, Kent Road, is the first turning on the left hand side, a few houses from the Elephant and Castle.

POPPING’S COURT, Fleet Street, is about seven houses on the right hand side, going from Farringdon Street.

PORRIDGE POT ALLEY, St. Luke’s, is about ten houses on the right hand side of Old Street, going from the church towards Goswell Street.

PORT OF LONDON SOCIETY for Promoting Religion among Seamen. – [see Bethel Union]

PORT OF LONDON AND BETHEL UNION SOCIETY, No. 18, Aldermanbury. – [see Bethel Union]

PORTAVILLE PASSAGE, Leicester Square, is three or four houses on the left hand side of Lisle Street, going from Little Newport Street.

PORTER’S COURT, is in Old Montague Street, Whitechapel, a few houses from Osborne Street.

PORTER STREET, Leicester Square, is the north continuation of Castle Street.

PORTLAND CHAPEL, Great Portland Street, Mary-le-bone, is about two furlongs on the left hand side, going north from Oxford Street.

PORTLAND MEWS, Portland Street, Wardour Street, is about eight houses on the left hand side, going from No. 72, Berwick Street.

PORTLAND PLACE, Cavendish Square, is situated between Charlotte Street and Harley Street, and derives its name from the Duke of Portland, upon whose estate it is built. It is one of the broadest and handsomest streets in the metropolis.

PORTLAND PLACE, UPPER, is the northern continuation of the preceding, and leads to Park Crescent.

PORTLAND ROAD, Mary-le-bone, is the continuation of Great Portland Street, and extends into the New Road.

PORTLAND ROW, Mary-le-bone, is part of the north side of the New Road, opposite the preceding.

PORTLAND STREET, GREAT, Mary-le-bone, is the continuation northward of John Street, Oxford Street.

PORTLAND STREET, LITTLE, Mary-le-bone, intersects Great Portland Street, about a furlong above Oxford Street.

PORTLAND STREET, Soho, is the second turning on the right hand side of Wardour Street, going from Oxford Street.

PORTLAND TOWN, is a district of mean houses north westward of Regent’s Park.

PORTLAND YARD, Fitzroy Square, is a few houses on the right hand side of Buckingham Place, going from the New Road.

PORTMAN MEWS, NORTH, Portman Square, are the first turning parallel to the north side of that square.

PORTMAN MEWS, SOUTH, Portman Square, are the first turning parallel to the south side of that square.

PORTMAN PLACE, Edgware Road, is a row of houses, rather more than three quarters of a mile on the right hand side, going from Tyburn Turnpike.

PORTMAN SQUARE, one of the largest and handsomest squares in the metropolis, is situated at the north end of Orchard Street. It contains many splendid town mansions of our principal nobility and gentry.

PORTMAN STREET, Portman Square, is the third turning on the left hand side of Oxford Street, going from Cumberland Gate.

PORTPOOL LANE, Gray’s Inn Lane, is about a quarter of a mile on the right hand side going from Middle Row, Holborn. It extends from Gray’s Inn Lane into Leather Lane.

PORTSMOUTH STREET, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, is at the south west corner, and leads into Clare Market.

PORTSOKEN WARD, is one of the eastern wards of the City, and derives its name from its situation, without Aldgate and the walls of the City, port soken signifying a liberty or franchise at the port, or gate. It contains all Whitechapel, as far as the bars, Middlesex Street, formerly Petticoat Lane, Houndsditch, and the Minories; and is bounded on the east by the parishes of Spitalfields, Stepney, and St. George’s in the East; on the south by Tower Hill; on the west by Aldgate ward, from which it is separated by the site of the ancient city wall, and on the north by the Ward of Bishopsgate. Its principal streets are, Whitechapel, as far as the bars, the Minories and Houndsditch, and its most remarkable buildings, the parish churches of St. Botolph, Aldgate, and Trinity, Minories.

The ward is divided into five municipal precincts, named, Houndsditch, High Street, the Bars, Tower Hill and the Convent Garden; and is governed by an alderman, (Sir James Shaw, Bart.) five common councilmen, and the usual other ward officers.

PORTUGAL ROW, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, is the south side of the square.

PORTUGAL STREET, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, is the first street parallel to, and behind the south side.

PORTUGAL STREET, South Audley Street, is parallel to part of the west side.

POST-HORSE DUTY OFFICE, Took’s Court, Chancery Lane.

POST OFFICE PACKET LIST, and SHIPPING LIST, are to be seen in the hal�???l of the General Post Office, St. Martin’s-le-Grand.

POST OFFICE, THE GENERAL. – [see General Post Office]

POSTERN ROW, Tower Hill, is on the north side of the Tower, and derives its name from the postern gate which stood at the eastern end of the row. It was erected soon after the Conquest, in a beautiful manner, with stone brought from Kent and Normandy. It was destroyed in 1190, by William Longchamp, Bishop of Ely, and Chancellor of England, in the reign of Richard I., to enlarge the Tower, which he encircled with the present ditch and outer embattled wall.

POTTER’S FIELDS, Lambeth, is between the south end of Pratt Street and Paradise Row.

POTTER’S FIELDS, Horselydown, are about half a mile on the left hand side of Tooley Street, going from London Bridge.

POULTRY, THE, is the east continuation of Cheapside, and extends to the Mansion House. It is so called from being an anciently occupied by poulterers’ stalls, which reached from Stock’s Market to Bucklersbury.

POUND PASSAGE, St. Luke’s, is a few houses on the left hand side of Ratcliffe Row, going from Bath Street, City Road.

POWELL’S ALLEY, Southwark, is about twelve houses on the right hand side of Kent Street, going from St. George’s Church.

POWELL’S PLACE, City Road, is about half a mile on the left hand side, going from Finsbury Square.

POWIS PLACE, Queen Square, is about eight houses on the left hand side of Great Ormond Street, from the square.

POWNALL TERRACE, Lambeth, is opposite Chester Place, near Kennington Cross.

PRATT’S BUILDINGS, Shadwell, are a few houses on the right hand side of New Gravel Lane, going from the High Street.

PRATT PLACE, Camden Town, is a row of houses near the Veterinary College, named after Pratt, Earl Camden, upon whose estate it is erected.

PRATT STREET, Lambeth, is the first turning on the left hand from the Three Stags.

PRAYER BOOK AND HOMILY SOCIETY, No. 34, Salisbury Square. – [see Bible Societies, No. 10]

PREROGATIVE COURT, College Square, Doctors’ Commons, is one of the ecclesiastical courts of England, and is so called from the prerogative of the Archbishop of Canterbury, who, by an especial privilege, beyond those of his suffragans, can try in this court all disputes that may arise concerning the last wills of persons within his province. The Judge of this court is styled Judex Curiæ Prerogativæ Cantuariensis. Its present officers are, the Right Hon. Sir John Nicoll, M.P., Master; the Rev. G. Moore, M.A., and the Rev. R. Moore, M.A., Registrars; Nathaniel Gosling, Charles Dyneley, and John Iggulden, Esqs., Deputy Registrars; and James Taylor, Esq., Apparitor General.

PREROGATIVE OFFICE, No. 6, Great Knight Rider Street, Doctors’ Commons, is an office belonging to the above named court, in which copies of all wills deposited in the office are written in large folio books, which may be inspected by any person, for one shilling each will that they may require to see.

PRESENTATION OFFICE, THE, is at No. 2, Hare Court, Middle Temple.

PRESCOTT STREET, GREAT, Goodman’s Fields, extends from the south end of Mansel Street to Lemon Street.

PRESCOTT�??? STREET, LITTLE, Goodman’s Fields, is the continuation of Mansel Street.

PRICE’S ALLEY, Golden Square, is about six houses on the left hand side of Little Pulteney Street, going from Great Windmill Street.

PRICE’S BUILDINGS, Southwark, is the last turning on the left hand side of Bowling Green Lane, going from King Street.

PRICE’S COURT. – 1. is in Old Street, St. Luke’s. – 2. is in Bird Cage Alley, Southwark. – 3. is in Queen Street, Southwark, 4. is in Gravel Lane, Christchurch.

PRICE’S PLACE, Christchurch, Surrey, is the last turning on the left hand side of Gravel Lane.

PRIEST ALLEY, Great Tower Street, is four houses on the left hand from the west side of Tower Hill.

PRIEST COURT, Foster Lane, is four houses on the right hand from Cheapside.

PRIMROSE ALLEY, Borough Market, is the first turning on the right hand side of Church Street, going from St. Saviour’s Dock.

PRIMROSE COURT, Finsbury, is the first turning on the right hand side of Long Alley, going from Primrose Street.

PRIMROSE HILL, Fleet Street, is at the south west corner of Salisbury Square, and leads to Water Lane.

PRIMROSE STREET, Bishopsgate Without, is nearly opposite Spital Square.

PRINCE’S ALLEY, Rotherhithe, is about the middle of the east side of Prince’s Street.

PRINCE’S COURT. Several of these courts and streets derive their names as well as those of King Street and Queen Street, after the restoration of Charles II., in honour of the royal family. – 1. is in Princes Street, Westminster, at the corner of Great George Street. – 2. is in Stafford Place, Pimlico. – 3. is in Whitecross Street, Charing Cross. – 4. is in Duke Street, St. James’s. – 5. is in Drury Lane. – 6. is in Porter Street, Leicester Square. – 7. is in Coleman Street, City. – 8. is in Banner Street, St. Luke’s. – 9. is in Old Gravel Lane, Ratcliffe Highway. – 10. is in Princes Street, Bethnal Green. – 11. is in Princes Street, London Road, St. George’s Fields. – 12. is in New Road, St. George’s in the East. – 13. is in Princes Row, Mile End New Town. – 14. is in the Commercial Road. – 15. is in Pimlico. – 16. is in Lambeth, near Kennington Cross.

PRINCE’S RENTS or ROW, Southwark, is the second turning on the right hand side of Lomon’s Pond.

PRINCE’S ROAD, Kennington Cross, is in Prince’s Place, nearly opposite Chester Place.

PRINCE’S ROW. – 1. is in King Street, Pimlico, or Chelsea. – 2. is in Newport Market. – 3. is in Mile End New Town.

PRINCE’S SQUARE. – 1. is in Prince’s Street, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, nearly opposite New Turnstile. – 2. is in St. George’s in the East, a few houses on the left hand in Prince’s Street. – 3. is at Kennington, the termination of Cleaver’s Street, going from the White Hart, Kennington Cross.

PRINCE’S STAIRS, Rotherhithe Street, is opposite Execution Dock, Wapping.

PRINCE’S STREET. – 1. is in Pimlico, the third turning on the left hand opposite Arabella Row. – 2. is in Westminster. – 3. is in Oxford Street. – 4. is in Drury Lane. – 5. is in Little Queen Street, Lincoln’s Inn Fields. – 6. is in Hanover Square. – 7. is in Soho. – 8. is in Red Lion Squa�???re. – 9. is in Northampton Street, Clerkenwell. – 10. is in Barbican. – 11. is in Mansion House Street. – 12. is in Wilson Street, Finsbury Square. – 13. is in Tyssen Street, Bethnal Green. – 14. is in Virginia Street, Bethnal Green. – 16. is in Brick Lane, Spitalfields. – 16. is in Rosemary Lane, or Sparrow Corner. – 17. is in Ratcliffe Highway. – 18. is in Charles Street, Old Gravel Lane. – 19. is in Great Hermitage Street, Wapping. – 20. is in Lambeth. – 21. is in the London Road, St. George’s Fields, the first turning on the right hand going from the Elephant and Castle towards the Obelisk. – 22. is in Duke Street, Southwark, between Queen Street and Charlotte Street.

PRINTER’S COURT, St. James’s, is about five houses on the right hand side of Bury Street, going from the west end of Jermyn Street.

PRINTERS’ PENSION SOCIETY, THE, is a charitable institution, founded in 1827, for the relief of Aged, Infirm and Distressed Workmen and their Widows, in the several branches of the Printing Trade. It is supported by voluntary contributions and subscriptions, of masters, workmen and friends of the trade. It is under the management of a committee of twenty-one subscribers, most of whom are master printers of the first respectability. John Crowder, Esq., Alderman, Vincent Figgins, Esq., William Venables, Esq., and John Bleaden, Esq., Trustees; William Venables, Esq., Alderman, Treasurer; John Bleaden, Esq., Honorary Secretary; Messrs. Rogers, Towgood and Co., Bankers; Messrs. James F. Blake, Thomas Brettell and Samuel Birkhead, Auditors; and Mr. Thomas Billing, No. 11, Great Distaff Lane, Friday Street, Collector.

PRINTERS’ PLACE, Bermondsey, is on the north side of Bermondsey Spa.

PRINTERS’ ROW, Bermondsey, is at the west end of the preceding.

PRINTERS’ STREET. – 1. is in Shoe Lane, at the west end of Little New Street. – 2. is in Earl Street, Blackfriars, the second turning on the left hand from Bridge Street.

PRINTING-HOUSE LANE, Blackfriars, is the second turning on the right hand side of Water Lane; it leads into Printing House Square.

PRINTING-HOUSE SQUARE, Blackfriars, is at the east end of the preceding. Two sides of it are occupied by the vast establishment and printing office of the Times Newspaper.

PRINTING-HOUSE YARD, Coleman Street, is the first turning on the right hand side of Great Swan Alley.

PRIORY OF St. BARTHOLOMEW – [see St. Bartholomew’s]

PRIOR COURT, Goodman’s Fields, is the second turning on the left hand side of Chamber Street, going from Lemon Street.

PRISON DISCIPLINE, THE, SOCIETY FOR IMPROVEMENT OF, is a charitable institution, founded in 1815, for the improvement and reformation of Juvenile Offenders. Its office is at No. 18, Aldermanbury, under the management of H.R.H. the Duke of Gloucester, Patron; Thomas Fowel Buxton, Esq., M.P., Treasurer; Samuel Hoare, Esq., Chairman of the Committee; Mr. J. Elliott, Clerk; Mr. W. Eddrup, No. 61, Houndsditch, Collector.

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE, THE, Whitehall, is a splendid apartment in the New Treasury, recently erected by Mr. Soane. – [see Board of Council]

PRIVY GARDENS, Whitehall, are nearly opposite the Horse-Guards, and derive their name from having been anciently the private gardens of Whitehall Palace. The site is now occupied by Richmond Buildings, and several mansions of the nobility and gentry.

PR�???IVY SEAL AND SIGNET OFFICE, Somerset Place, is the third house on the left in the square, entering from the Strand. – [see Signet Office]

PROMOTER, THE, LIFE ASSURANCE AND ANNUITY COMPANY, No. 9, Chatham Place, Blackfriars. The business of this office is conducted by a board of eight directors, of whom the Hon. George H. L. Dundas, M.P. is Chairman; and Michael Saward, Esq., Secretary.

PROSPECT PLACE. – 1. is on Stepney Green, the third turning on the right. – 2. is in New Road, St. George’s in the East. – 3. is in Poplar High Street or Road. – 4. is in White Hart Row, Kennington. – 5. is in St. George’s Fields. – 6. is in Bermondsey. – 7. is in Paradise Street, Rotherhithe.

PROSPECT ROW. – 1. is in Henry Street, between Penton Street and Hermes Street. – 2. is on Cambridge Heath, Hackney Road, and forms part of the north side of the road which leads from the Turnpike towards Bonner’s Hall. – 3. is in the Mile End Road, and forms part of the north side, opposite Ewing’s Buildings. – 4. is in Blue Anchor Road, Bermondsey, near the turnpike by Fort Place.

PROTHONOTARIES OFFICE, THE, is in Tanfield Court, Temple, It is an office of the Court of Common Pleas, and derives its name from Prothonotaries, a chief notary or clerk, and they are accordingly the chief clerks of this court.

The business of the Prothonotaries is to enter and enrol all declarations, pleadings, assizes, judgments and actions, to make out judicial writs, &c. In their office all the attorneys of the Court of Common Pleas enter their causes. The Prothonotaries are three in number, and the present are, Thomas Hudson, George Wadington and Henry B. Ray, Esqrs. Each of these has a secondary, who, at present, are George Griffiths, Jonathan Hewlett and John H. Chancellor, Esqrs.; and their business is to draw up the rules of the court.

PROTECTOR FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY OFFICE, is at No. 36, Old Jewry, and is under the management of James Brogden, Esq., M.P., Chairman; Richardson Borradaile, Esq., M.P., Deputy Chairman; nineteen other Directors, and Wilmer Harris, Esq., Secretary.

PROTESTANT DISSENTERS’ CHARITY SCHOOL, THE, are various. – 1. is in Wood Street, Spitalfields. – 2. is in Bartholomew Close. – 3. is in Ball Court, Giltspur Street, a few houses on the right hand from Newgate Street. – 4. is in Moorfields. – 5. is in Maze Pond, Southwark, about six houses on the right hand from Weston Street.

PROVIDENCE BUILDINGS. – 1. is in Mill Street, Dockhead. – 2. is in the Kent Road, about a quarter of a mile from the Elephant and Castle.

PROVIDENCE CHAPEL, is on the east side of Gray’s Inn Lane, nearly opposite Guildford Street, and was built by Wm. Huntington, the preaching coal-heaver.

PROVIDENCE COURT. – 1. is in Great Peter Street, Westminster. – 2. is on the east side of North Audley Street. – 3. is in White’s Ground, Bermondsey, the first turning on the right hand side going from Crucifix Lane. – 4. is in White’s Yard, Rosemary Lane.

PROVIDENCE PLACE. – 1. is in Bakers’ Row, Clerkenwell, the fourth turning on the left hand side going from the Workhouse, Coppice Row. – 2. is in Ball Court, Golden Lane. – 3. is in Middlesex Street, Whitechapel. – 4. is part of the right hand side of the Commercial Road, five houses eastward of the church. – 5. is in Upper Kennington Lane, near Vauxhall Gardens. – 6. is in Lambeth Marsh. – 7. is in Webber Row, Westminster Bridge Road. – 8. is at the south end of the Borough Road, Southwark. – 9. is in�??? Crosby Row, Snow’s Fields. – 10. is in Southwark, at the east end of Fox’s Buildings, Kent Road.

PROVIDENCE ROW. – 1. is in Palmer’s Village, Westminster, the first turning on the left hand from the north side of Bridewell. – 2. is in Pentonville or Battle Bridge, a few houses on the right hand going towards Somers Town. – 3. is the first turning northward of Finsbury Square, and extends from the City Road to Paul Street. – 4. is in Duke Street, Bethnal Green, a few houses from Gibraltar Row. – 5. is in Lambeth Marsh, and forms part of the south side of the road adjoining Green’s Row. – 6. is in Bennet Row, St. George’s Fields, about a furlong from Blackfriars’ Road.

PROVIDENCE STREET, City Road, is about a furlong from Old Street Road.

PRUJEAN COURT or SQUARE, Old Bailey, is about seven houses on the left hand side going from Ludgate Hill.

PRUSSIAN (a corruption of PRUSON’S) ISLAND, Wapping Street, is about five houses westward of New Gravel Lane.

PUBLIC DISPENSARY, THE, is a charitable institution, established in 1783, for the relief, by Advice and Medicine, of the numerous Poor in the vicinity of Clare Market, Drury Lane, Chancery Lane, Temple Bar, Strand, Holborn, Fleet Street, Farringdon Street, Ludgate, Black and Whitefriars, &c. The business of the establishment is conducted in Bishop’s Court, Lincoln’s Inn, under the management of H.R.H. the Duke of Sussex, President; the Earl of Eldon and six other Vice Presidents; J. Park, Esq., Treasurer; James Alderson, M.D., Physician; James Laird, M.D., Consulting Physician; Richard Goddard, Secretary.

PUBLIC LEDGER NEWSPAPER OFFICE, THE, is on the south side of Fleet Street, between Salisbury Court and Water Lane.

PUDDING LANE, Lower Thames Street, is the first turning on the left hand from Fish Street Hill. In this lane the fire of London broke out, at a house exactly the same distance from the Monument, as that column is high. Upon the house that was rebuilt after the fire, was set up by civic authority the following inscription, that was afterwards removed by the same authority.

“Here, by the permission of Heaven, Hell broke loose upon this Protestant city, from the malicious hearts of barbarous Papists, by the hand of their agent Hubert: who confessed, and on the ruins of this place declared this fact, for which he was hanged, vis. That here began the dreadful fire, which is described and perpetuated, on and by the neighbouring pillar, erected 1681, in the mayoralty of Sir Patience Ward, Knight.”

PUDDLE DOCK, Earl Street, Blackfriars, is between the west end of Upper Thames Street, and the east end of Earl Street, Blackfriars. It derives its name from the pool, or puddle, created by the Horses for whom it was anciently used as a watering place.

PULTENEY COURT, Little Windmill Street, Haymarket, is opposite Silver Street.

PULTENEY STREET, GREAT, Golden Square, is about five houses on the right hand side of Brewer Street, going from Little Windmill Street.

PULTENEY STREET, LITTLE, Haymarket, is the first turning on the right hand side of Great Windmill Street, going from Coventry Street.

PUMP COURT. – 1. is in Perkin’s Rents, Old Pye Street, Westminster, two or three houses on the right hand from No. 49, Old Pye Street. – 2. is in the Temple, the first turning on the left hand in Middle Temple Lane. – 3. is in Moor Lane, Cripplegate, the third turning on the right hand. – 4. is in Br�???idgewater Gardens, Cripplegate. – 5. is in Dean Street, Upper East Smithfield, the first turning on the left hand from Upper East Smithfield. – 6. is in Boddy’s Bridge, Christ Church, between Stamford Street and Upper Ground Street. – 7. is in Duke Street, Southwark, a few houses from Queen Street, going towards Blackfriars’ Road. – 8. is in Tooley Street, at the north end of Tooley’s Gateway, and leads to Robinhood Court. – 9. is in Bermondsey, about the middle of the north side of Long Lane, near Richardson Street. – 10. is in Old Street Road, nearly opposite the Vinegar Yard.

PUMP YARD, Ratcliffe, is part of the west end of Queen Street.

PUNDERSON’S GARDENS, Bethnal Green Road, is the second turning on the right hand.

PUNDERSON’S PLACE, Bethnal Green Road, forms part of the north side near the green.

PURIM PLACE, Dog Row, Bethnal Green, is a few houses from Mile End Turnpike towards the said green.

PYE CORNER, West Smithfield, is on the left hand side of Giltspur Street, at the corner of the last street, before coming to the market It was at this spot that the great fire of London ended, which give rise to the saying that the city was destroyed for the sin of gluttony, as the fire began at Pudding Lane, and ended at Pye Corner

PYE GARDENS, Bankside, is at the east end of Willow Street, near the Thames.

PYE STREET, NEW, Westminster, is the second turning on the right hand side of Orchard Street, going from Strutton Ground.

PYE STREET, OLD, Great Peter Street, Westminster, extends from Great St. Ann’s Street to Duck Lane.

PYED BULL YARD, Bloomsbury, is on the right hand side of Little Russell Street, four or five houses from Bury Street.

Q

QUAKER STREET, Spitalfields, it on the north side of Brick Lane.

QUALITY COURT, Chancery Lane, is about a quarter of a mile on the right hand side, going from Fleet Street. It leads to the office of the Masters in Chancery, and to Southampton Buildings, Holborn.

QUARTER MASTER GENERAL’S OFFICE, THE, is at the Horse Guards, Whitehall, northward of the Commander in Chief’s Office. Its present officers are, Lieut. Gen. Sir James William Gordon, Bart., M.P., Quarter Master General; Major General Sir Richard D. Jackson, Deputy Quarter Master, General Lieut. Col. James Freeth, Assistant Quarter Master General; Lieut. John Enoch, 23d Foot, Deputy Assistant Quarter Master General; John O’Neil, Esq., Confidential Clerk.

QUEBEC CHAPEL, is about ten houses on the left hand side of Quebec Street, going from Oxford Street.

QUEBEC MEWS, are at No. 20, on the middle of the west side of New Quebec Street, Portman Square.

QUEBEC STREET. There are several of this name at the western end of Oxford Street, named from the capture of Quebec, in North America, by General Wolfe. – 1. is in Oxford Street, the last turning but one on the north side, before coming to the Edgware Road. – 2. NEW, is on the western side of Portman Square. – 3. GREAT, is the fifth turning on the right hand side of the New Road, St. Mary-le-bone, going from the Yorkshire Stingo. – 4. NORTH, is opposite the preceding.

QUEEN ANNE’S BOUNTY OFFICE, is at No. 3, Dean’s Yard, Westminster; for other particulars see Aug�??mentation Office.

QUEEN ANNE STREET, WEST, Cavendish Square, is at the north side of Chandos Street, parallel to Wigmore Street; and being built on the estate of Harley, Earl of Oxford, Prime Minister to Queen Anne, it received the name of that sovereign.

QUEEN ANNE STREET, Whitechapel Road, is in Ducking Pond Row, nearly opposite the London Workhouse.

QUEEN’S ANN’S COURT, Blackfriars’ Road, is about three houses on the left side of Upper Ground Street, going from the High Road.

QUEEN CHARLOTTE ROW, Mary-le-bone, is on the south side of the New Road, beginning on the east side of the Yorkshire Stingo. It derives its name from the consort of George III., and the contiguity of a lying-in hospital, called after that Queen.

QUEEN’S COURT. – 1. is in King Street, Covent Garden. – 2. is on the south side of Great Queen Street, Lincoln’s Inn Fields. – 3. is in High Holborn, nearly opposite Dean Street, Red Lion Square. – 4. is on the north side of the Circus, Minories. – 5. is the third turning on the right hand side of King Street, Bethnal Green, going from Brick Lane. – 6. is in King Street, Commercial Road. – 7. is at the south end of Queen’s Row, in the Dog Row, Bethnal Green. – 8. is in Queen’s Row, St. George’s in the East, a few houses from Prussian Island. – 9. is in Queen Street, Ratcliffe. – 10. is in Great Suffolk Street, Southwark. – 11. is in Queen Street, in the Mint, Southwark. – 12. is in Little Queen Street, Southwark. – 13. LITTLE, is a few houses northward of the preceding.

QUEEN ELIZABETH’S SCHOOL, Southwark, is in School House Lane, Tooley Street, and was founded and endowed by that princess, for instructing the Boys of St. Olave’s, in English, Latin, Grammar, Writing and Accounts. It is supported by an estate in Horselydown, which, persuant to the letters of incorporation, is, together with the school, under the management of sixteen of the parishioners.

QUEEN’S HEAD ALLEY. – 1. is in Wapping. – 2. is in White Horse Street, Ratcliffe.

QUEEN’S HEAD COURT. – 1. is in Lambeth Upper Marsh, nearly opposite Stangate Street. – 2. is in Great Suffolk Street, Southwark. – 3. is in Great Windmill Street. – 4. is in Gray’s Inn Lane. – 5. is in Giltspur Street. – 6. is in Charlotte Street, Whitechapel Road.

QUEEN’S HEAD PASSAGE, Newgate Street, is the second turning on the left hand going from Cheapside, and leads through St. John’s Court into St. Martin’s-le-Grand.

QUEEN’S HEAD SQUARE, Lambeth Upper Marsh, is by Stangate Street.

QUEEN’S HEAD YARD, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, is in Great Queen Street, about four houses from the square.

QUEENHITHE, Upper Thames Street, is a small hithe or haven nearly opposite Bread Street Hill, and is much used for the landing of corn, flour and other dry goods, from thee west of England. It belonged anciently to Edred, a Saxon chieftain, and was called after him, Edred’s hithe. It afterwards fell into the hands of King Stephen, and in the reign of Henry III. it was called Ripa Reginæ, or the Queen’s hithe, the revenues being settled on her.

QUEENHITHE WARD derives its name from its contiguity to the preceding, and is bounded on the north, by Bread Street and Cordwainers Wards; on the east, by Dowgate Ward; on the south, by the Thames; and on the west, by Castle Baynard Ward. The leading streets and lanes in the ward are, Knight Rider Street, Old Fish Street, Fis�???h Street Hill, part of Upper Thames Street, Great and Little Trinity Lane, Bread Street Hill, Lambeth Hill and Huggin Lane. Its principal buildings are, the parish churches of St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, St. Mary Somerset, and St. Michael Queenhithe; and the halls of the Painter Stainers and Blacksmiths. – [see those several buildings]

This ward is divided into nine municipal precincts, and is governed by an alderman (Wm. Venables, Esq.) a deputy and five other common councilmen, with the usual other ward officers.

QUEEN’S PALACE, THE. – [see Buckingham Palace]

QUEEN’S PLACE. – 1. is in Great Peter Street, Westminster, the second turning on the left hand going from Strutton Ground. – 2. is on the south side of Queen Street, Chelsea. – 3. is in New Street, Kennington, opposite the west end of Park Street. – 4. is on the west side of Kennington Common. – 5. is at the north end of Little Queen Street, Southwark.

QUEEN’S ROW. – 1. is in Pimlico, from Ward’s Row to Duke’s Row. – 2. is at the north end of Palmer’s Village, Westminster. – 3. is part of the left hand side of the Pentonville Road. – 4. is at Hoxton, between Turner’s Square and Workhouse Lane. – 5. is in the Dog Row, Bethnal Green. – 6. is in King Street, St. George’s in the East. – 7. is nearly opposite Kennington Common.

QUEEN SQUARE. – 1. is in Westminster, between the Broadway and the middle of the south side of St. James’s Park. – 2. is near Great Ormond Street and Southampton Row. This square was formerly open to the north, and had a fine view of the beautiful landscape formed by the hills of Highgate and Hampstead, and of the adjacent country, but the genius of speculation has closed it up with a dead wall of modern brick houses. – 3. is in Aldersgate Street, near Little Britain, and nearly opposite Jewin Street.

QUEEN STREET, Many of these streets were thus named after the Reformation, in honour of the royal family. – 1. is opposite King Street, Cheapside, and leads down to the Southwark Bridge, and thence into Southwark. This street was widened after the fire of London, as leading down to the Three Cranes Stairs, in the Vintry, the usual place of embarkation of the Lord Mayor and Aldermen from Guildhall, and its name changed to Queen Street, by act of parliament. – 2. is in Brompton, the fourth turning on the left hand going from Knightsbridge. – 3. is in Chelsea, between Ranelagh Walk and the Royal Hospital. – 4. GREAT, is in Westminster. – 5. LITTLE, is in Princes Street, Westminster, and is the continuation of the preceding. – 6. is in the Edgware Road, the sixth turning on the right hand from the north west corner of Oxford Street. – 7. LITTLE, is the first turning on the right hand in the preceding. – 8. is in Oxford Street, the fourth turning on the right hand from Hyde Park. – 9. is also in Oxford Street, about the third of a mile on the left hand from St. Giles’s. – 10. is in Curzon Street, May Fair, the first turning westward of Half Moon Street. – 11. is in Great Windmill Street, Haymarket, about ten houses from Piccadilly. – 12. is in Dean Street, Soho, the second turning on the left hand from Oxford Street. – 13. GREAT, is at the north west corner of Lincoln’s Inn Fields, and extends into Drury Lane. – 14 LITTLE, extends from the preceding into High Holborn. – 15. is in Perceval Street, Northampton Square. – 16. is in Worship Street, the second turning on the right hand from Paul Street. – 17. is in Quaker Street, Spitalfields, a few yards from Brick Lane. – 18. is in Church Street, Mile End New Town, the second turning on the right from Baker’s Row. – 19. is the second turning on the right hand in Rosemary Lane, going from Tower Hill. – 20. is �???in King Street, St. George’s in the East. – 21. is the continuation of Broad Street, Ratcliffe. – 22. is in Poplar High Street, by the Queen’s Head Tavern. – 23. is the continuation of Union Street, Southwark. – 24. is in the Mint, Southwark. – 25. LITTLE, is in King Street, Southwark. – 26. is in Free School Street, Horselydown. – 27. is a few houses below King Street, Rotherhithe. – 28. LOWER, is the continuation of Rotherhithe Street, about a mile and a quarter below the church.

QUICKSET ROW, Mary-le-bone, is on the north side of the New Road, nearly opposite Fitzroy Square.

R

RACQUET COURT, Fleet Street, is about ten houses on the right hand side from the corner of Farringdon Street.

RAG FAIR, Rosemary Lane, is the nickname for the centre of the lane, which is the grand mart of the metropolis, in the article of old clothes, which, however contemptible the trade may appear, is a source of great wealth to many who embark in it. A large building on the north side is called the Clothes’ Exchange.

RAGGED STAFF COURT, Drury Lane, is about ten houses on the right hand from the west end of Holborn.

RAHUS PLACE, Whitechapel, is the third turning on the right hand side of Church Lane, going from Cable Street.

RAINE’S HOSPITAL, St. George’s in the East, is opposite the east end of Charles Street, Old Gravel Lane. It was erected and founded in 1737, by Henry Raine, Esq., who having acquired a considerable fortune as a brewer, near Prussian, or Pruson’s Island, Wapping, endowed it by deed of gift, with a perpetual annuity of £240 a year, and the sum of £4,000 to be laid out in a purchase.

The children of this hospital, which contains fifty boys and fifty girls, are selected from a preparatory school, called the old school, also built and endowed by the same liberal benefactor in 1719. They are taught reading, writing, and the girls, in addition, needle and household work, in order to qualify them for service, to which they are put, when they have been three years on the foundation.

He also bequeathed £100 to two girls to be drawn for out of six, as a wedding portion, under certain regulations, which are printed at length, together with a copy of the founder’s will, and other interesting particulars in Highmore’s Pietas Londinensis, and £5 to each for a wedding entertainment. Mr. Highmore says, he recollects, with great satisfaction, to have been an invited guest on the 1st of May, (the wedding anniversary) some years since, when the Rev. Dr. Mayo was rector, and presided, according to the provisions of the will. A large company was assembled, and, at a suitable time, after dinner, silence was proclaimed, and two of these brides, with their husbands, were announced and led to the chair, when they were addressed by their venerable pastor in language of affectionate interest for their welfare, and were presented with their respective purses, accompanied with recommendations of prudent management and earnest wishes for their prosperity. He further observes, that their modesty and delicacy were very conspicuous through the joy, which their recent marriage, and the weight of so large a benefaction had excited; and the company bore their testimonies of congratulation on their success.

The trusts of Mr. Raine’s will have been sanctioned by a decree in the Court of Chancery, on the 4th March, 1740, and an act of parliament was afterwards obtained to incorporate the trustees, and to enable them the better to fulfil the duties of the trusts reposed in them by the founder’s�?? will. They are therefore a body corporate, with the name of “The Governors and Trustees of Raine’s Charities.”

It is under the management of the Rev. Robert Farringdon, D.D., Rector of St. George’s in the East, President; the lecturer, the Churchwardens and forty-two of the most respectable parishioners, Governors, and Charles Stutfield, Esq., Treasurer.

RAM ALLEY. – 1. is in Spicer Street, Spitalfields. – 2. is near Globe Stairs, Rotherhithe Street. – 3. is in Cow Cross, West Smithfield. – 4. or COURT, is on the south side of Fleet Street, nearly opposite Fetter Lane.

RANCE’S COURT, Shadwell, is at Lower Turning, behind Shakspeare’s Walk.

RANDALL’S CAUSEWAY, Rotherhithe, is at the entrance to the Surrey Canal.

RANDALL’S RENTS, Rotherhithe, is on the north side of the Commercial Docks, and extends from Russell Street to the Thames.

RANELAGH PLACE, Pimlico, is the second turning on the right hand from Arabella Row.

RANELAGH STREET, Pimlico, is the first turning on the left hand side of Arabella Row, going from Pimlico.

RANELAGH STREET, UPPER, Pimlico, is the continuation of the preceding.

RANELAGH WALK, Chelsea, is the first turning on the left hand westward of the bridge, by the neat houses.

RATCLIFFE, is a large hamlet or district, formerly in the parish of Stepney, but is now a parish called St. George in the East, (see that article). It commences at Cock Hill, at the eastern end of Shadwell High Street, and continues along the Thames to Limehouse.

RATCLIFFE COURT. – 1. is in John’s Row, St. Luke’s, the first turning on the left hand from the north end of Brick Lane. – 2. is in Ratcliffe Highway, about thirty houses eastward of Cannon Street.

RATCLIFFE CROSS, extends from the east end of Broad Street, Ratcliffe Highway, to the Thames.

RATCLIFFE CROSS STAIRS, are at the west end of Narrow Street, about two miles below London Bridge.

RATCLIFFE DOCK, is on the west side of the preceding.

RATCLIFFE GARDENS, St. Luke’s, is the third turning on the left hand side of Ratcliffe Row, westward of Bath Street.

RATCLIFFE HIGHWAY, is the continuation eastward of Parson’s Street and Upper East Smithfield, as far as Shadwell High Street.

RATCLIFFE PLACE, St. Luke’s is a few yards on the left hand side of Ratcliffe Row, going from Bath Street.

RATCLIFFE ROW, St. Luke’s, is at a few houses on the right hand side of Bath Street, going from the City Road.

RATCLIFFE SCHOOL, is a charitable institution founded by Nicholas Gibson, Sheriff of London, in 1537, for the education of sixty poor children. It is attached to the adjoining alms houses, and is under the management of the Coopers Company. – [see Coopers Hall]

RATCLIFFE SQUARE, Commercial Road, is situated between White Horse Street and Stepney Causeway.

RATHBONE PLACE, Oxford Street, is about twenty three houses on the right hand side going from Tottenham Court Road.

RATHBONE PLACE, UPPER, is the continuation of the preceding.

RAVEN COURT, Fetter Lane, is on the western side, nearly opposite Dean Street.

RAVEN ROW. – 1. is the continuation of Widegate Street, Bishopsgate, towards Spitalfields. – 2. is in the Whitechapel Road, on the eastern side of the London Workhouse.

RAVENSHEAR’S RENTS, Leather Lane, is the first turning on the left hand side of Vine Street, going from Bedford Street.

RAWSTORNE STREET. – 1. is in the Islington Road, the fifth turning on the right hand beyond St. John Street – 2. is the third turning on the right hand side of Brompton, going from Knightsbridge.

RAY’S BUILDINGS, Chelsea, is at the west end of Ebury Street.

RAY STREET, Clerkenwell, is at the north west corner of Clerkenwell Green.

RAY STREET PLACE, Clerkenwell, is three houses on the right hand side in the preceding, going from the green.

READ’S ALLEY, Rotherhithe, is about ten houses on the right, below King and Queen Stairs.

REBECCA COURT, Oxford Street, is the last turning on the right hand side of Wells Street, going from Oxford Street.

RECORD OFFICE, Tower of London, is kept in Wakefield’s Tower, which joins the Bloody Tower, near Traitor’s Bridge. It consists of several apartments, in which are deposited in secure presses, all the rolls from the first year of King John to the beginning of Richard III., but those subsequent to that period are kept in the Rolls Chapel. The present officers are, Henry Petre, Esq., F.R.S., Keeper; John Bayley, Esq., F.R.S., Chief Clerk; three Senior Clerks, and two Junior Clerks. In the Rolls Chapel, John Kipling, Esq., is Keeper; Thomas Palmer, Esq., Chief Clerk, and two Assistant Clerks.

REDCROSS COURT. – 1. is in High Street, Southwark, about twelve houses southward of Union Street. – 2. is in Cow Lane, the second turning on the left from West Smithfield. – 3. is in Barbican, behind the Redcross public house.

REDCROSS SQUARE. – 1. is in Cripplegate, the second turning on the right hand side of Jewin Street, going from Aldersgate. – 2. is in Tower Street, nine houses eastward of Mark Lane.

REDCROSS STREET, Cripplegate, extends from the west end of Fore Street to Barbican. At the upper end of this street, opposite the west end of Beech Street, stood anciently a red cross, the emblem of the Crusaders, which gave its name to the street. – 2. is in Nightingale Lane, East Smithfield. – 3. is in the Park, Southwark, the first turning on the right hand side of Union Street, going from the Borough High Street.

REDCROSS STREET LIBRARY, is a Literary establishment founded in 1711, by Daniel Williams, D.D., a Presbyterian minister, for the use of the dissenting ministers of the Presbyterian, Independent and Baptist persuasions. He bequeathed his valuable collection of books and manuscripts for this purpose, with suitable salaries for a librarian and a keeper. This establishment is under the management of twenty-four Trustees; the Rev. John Coates, Librarian; John Wainwright, Esq., Secretary; and Richard Webb Jupp, Esq., of Carpenters’ Hall, Receiver. Among other curiosities preserved in the museum of this library, are a fine Egyptian mummy, and a glass basin, which held the water wherewith Queen Elizabeth was baptized.

REDCROSS STREET SCHOOL, was founded in 1709, by Lady Eleanor Holies, a relation of the Duke of Newcastle, for the education of fifty poor girls belonging to the parish of St. �???Giles’s, Cripplegate. Being kept in the same house with the boys’ school belonging to that parish, it is generally taken to be the parish school for girls.

REDGATE ALLEY, Minories, is nearly opposite the Crescent.

REDGATE COURT, Minories, in six houses on the right hand going from Trinity Square.

RED LION ALLEY, Smithfield, is at the west end of Greenhill’s Rents, Cow Cross.

RED LION COURT. – 1. is in White Hart Yard, Drury Lane. – 2. is in Fleet Street, ten houses eastward of Fetter Lane. – 3. is in Shoe Lane, the fourth turning on the left hand from Holborn. – 4. is on the right hand side of Great Saffron Hill, going from Holborn. – 5. is in Silver Street, six houses on the right hand from Wood Street, Cheapside. – 6. is in Watling Street. – 7. is in St. John Street, about a quarter of a mile on the right hand from Smithfield – 8. is the first turning on the left hand side of Charter House Lane, going from the square towards St. John’s Street. – 9. is in London Wall, the first turning eastward of Coleman Street. – 10. is in Red Lion Street, Spitalfields, eight houses northward of the church. – 11. is in George Street, Bethnal Green. – 12. is in the Minories, the second turning on the right hand from Trinity Square. – 13. is in Red Lion Street, Wapping. – 14. is in Bermondsey Street, about a furlong on the left hand from Tooley Street.

RED LION PASSAGE. – 1. is at St. Pancras, on the western side of the Small Pox Hospital. – 2. is in Red Lion Square, Holborn, and leads from the south east corner of the square into Red Lion Street. – 3. is in Fleet Street, the continuation of Red Lion Court. – 4. is in Whitecross Street. – 5. is at Hoxton, and leads from nearly opposite the Britannia Tavern into the Kingsland Road. – 6. is in Redcross Street, Southwark, ten houses southward of Queen Street. – 7. is the third turning on the right hand in Cloth Fair, going from Smithfield.

RED LION PLACE, West Smithfield, is the first turning on the left hand side of Cock Lane, going from Giltspur Street.

RED LION SQUARE, Holborn, is situated southward of Queen Square, and westward of Bedford Row.

RED LION STREET. – 1. is in Holborn, about half a mile from the north end of Farringdon Street. – 2. is near the middle of the south side of Clerkenwell Green. – 3. is in Spitalfields, on the west side of the church. – 4. is in Whitechapel, the fourth turning on the right hand going from Aldgate. – 5. is in Wapping, the fourth turning on the left hand below the church. – 6. is in High Street, Southwark, near St. Margaret’s Hill.

RED LION YARD. – 1. is in Princes Street, Westminster, the second turning on the left hand from Tothill Street. – 2. is at the west end of Charles Street, Berkeley Square. – 3. is in Tottenham Court Road. – 4. is in Old Cavendish Street. – 5. is in High Holborn, opposite Dean Street. – 6. is in Upper King Street, Bloomsbury. – 7. is in Eagle Street, Red Lion Square. – 8. is in Great Warner Street, Coppice Row, Clerkenwell. – 9. is in Red Lion Street, Clerkenwell, three houses on the left hand from the green. – 10. is in Long Lane, West Smithfield, ten houses on the left hand from Aldersgate Street. – 11. is in Stangate, the first turning on the right hand from Westminster Bridge.

RED ROSE ALLEY, Cripplegate, is the second turning in Whitecross Street, southward of Chiswell Street.

RED MAID LANE, Wapping, is on the north side of Great Hermitage Street, by the wall of the London Docks.

REDMAN’S ROW, Mile End, is the continuation of Grove Place.

REEVE’S COURT. – 1. is in Angel Square, Bishopsgate. – 2. is in White’s Yard, Rosemary Lane.

REFUGE FOR THE DESTITUTE, Middlesex house, Hackney Road, for females, and at Hoxton for males, is a charitable institution founded in 1806, by voluntary contributions, for the purpose of providing a place of refuge for persons discharged from prisons or the hulks, unfortunate and deserted females, and others who from loss of character, or extreme indigence, cannot, though willing to work, procure an honest maintenance, and in cases of very urgent necessity, to afford temporary relief until parochial or other assistance can be obtained.

The present officers are, the Marquess of Lansdowne, President; the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Duke of Bedford, and fifteen other noblemen, bishops, judges and gentlemen. Vice President; Edward Fonter, Esq., Treasurer; the Rev. Robert Crosby, M.A., Chaplain and Secretary; Benjamin C. Pierce, M.D., and John Sims, M.D., Physicians; William J. Lewis, Esq., Surgeon; Mr. James Searle, Superintendent of the Male Establishment; Mr, Joseph Hoskins, Superintendent of the Female Establishment; Mr. Abraham Tattet, Canterbury Place, Lambeth, Collector.

REGENCY COURT, is at No. 8, Blossom Street, Norton Falgate.

REGENCY PLACE, is at No. 4, Blackfriars Road.

REGENT’S CIRCUS, THE. – 1. is at the intersection of Regent Street and Oxford Street. – 2. is the intersection of the same Street and Piccadilly.

REGENT’S GARDENS, turn off at No. 15, Regent Street.

REGENT’S PARK, THE, Mary-le-bone, was named after our late King, George the Fourth, in honour of his long and prosperous regency; a monarch, who, if named after the manner of the French, would deserve, from his liberal patronage of all the arts, and his munificent donations of the royal library to the British Museum, of casts and pictures to the Royal Academy, and other similar acts of liberality, to be named, “George the Magnificent.” It is part of the ancient manor of Mary-le-bone, still more anciently called Tybourne, from its situation near a small bourn, or rivulet, formerly called Aye Brook or Eye Brook.

The limited nature of this work will not permit of much historical detail, therefore the reader is referred to my work of “London in the Nineteenth Century,” for full details, and well engraved views of the splendid villas, mansions, lodges, terraces, and other buildings, that are spread about within its tasteful area.

It is bounded on the south by the New Road, from which it has five entrances, two between the east and west sides of Park Square, opposite Park Crescent, Portland Place, one between Ulster Terrace and York Terrace, one opposite Mary-le-bone Church, called York Gate, and another, opposite Baker Street, between Cornwall Terrace and Clarence Terrace; on the west, by a new road leading to Lisson Grove; to the north, by Primrose Hill; and on the west, by streets reaching to the Hampstead Road. The Regent’s Canal encircles nearly the northern half, carried through a beautifully planted valley. In the centre is a circular road called the Ring, a beautiful circuitous road goes entirely round it. It is planted in a very tasteful manner, and the elegantly formed lake, with its numerous islets and plantations produce a most enchanting effect. The whole of it was designed and laid out by John Nash, Esq., and is one of the best examples of taste in landscape gardening and picturesque architecture in Europe.

The principal buildings in this splendid park, are York Gate, York Terrace, Cornwall Terrace, Clarence Terrace, Sussex Place, Hanover Terrace, Macclesfield Bridge and Gate, the menagerie and gardens of the Zoological Society, East Gate, the Royal Hospital of St. Katherine, Cumberland Terrace, Chester Terrace, Cambridge Terrace, the Colosseum, St. Andrew’s Place, Park Square, the Diorama, Ulster Terrace, the Royal York Baths, (see all those places) and the villas of the Marquess of Hertford, Sir Herbert Taylor, as Master of St. Katherine’s Hospital, Lady Arbuthnot; Mr. Burton’s, called the Holme, and Mr. Maberlys.

REGENT’S PLACE. – 1. is in Crown Street, Leicester Square. – 2. UPPER, is in Regent Street, Horse Ferry Road, Westminster. – 3. is in the Commercial Road, Limehouse. – 4. is in Leader Street, Brompton.

REGENT SQUARE, Gray’s Inn Road, is a new square now building on the western side of that road, near Sidmouth Street.

REGENT STREET. – 1. is a splendid new street, named as the preceding, which extends from Pall Mall to Langham Place, Cavendish Square. It has many fine rows of houses, from the designs of Messrs. Nash, Soane, Repton, Abraham, Decimus Burton, and other eminent architects, besides Waterloo Place, a handsome square opposite the site of Carlton Palace, the Quadrant, a double row of shops under two quadrangular colonnades, the County, and other Fire Offices, Carlton Chambers, the Athenæum, and other Club Houses, two circuses, one in Piccadilly, and one in Oxford Street, &c., which may be found under their respective heads. – [see those several articles] – 2. is in Hunter Street, Kent Street Road. – 3. is in Leader Street, Brompton. – 4. is in Spread Eagle Street, Limehouse. – 5. is at Blackwall Causeway at the west end of Caulker Street. – 6. is at No. 3, Princes Road, Kennington Cross. – 7. is in the Vauxhall Bridge Road, near Vincent Square, Westminster.

REGENT’S TERRACE, Chelsea, is in the King’s Lower Road.

REGENT’S CANAL COMPANY’S OFFICE, is at No. 98, Great Russell Street, Bloomsbury. The business of this company, whose canal reaches from the Grand Junction Canal at Paddington, to the Thames at Limehouse, is conducted by a committee of fourteen proprietors, of whom the Earl of Macclesfield is Chairman, and J. Drinkwater, Esq., Deputy Chairman; John R. Ward, Esq., Treasurer; James W. Lyon, Esq., Solicitor and Clerk; James Morgan, Esq., Engineer, and Edward L. Snee, Esq., Secretary.

REGISTER OFFICE, THE, appertaining to the Court of Chancery, is in Chancery Lane, and the hours of attendance are from 10 to 2, and from 5 to 8. Its present officers are, the Duke of St. Albans, Hereditary Registrar; Thos. A. Raynsford, and Francis B. Bedwell, Esq., Registrars to the Lord Chancellors; James C. Fry, and Edward D. Colvill, Esqrs., Registrars to the Master of the Rolls; William South, and Joseph Collis, Esqrs., Entering Registrars; Messrs. John Reid, and James Bides, Agents to the Entering Registrars; James Bird, Clerk of Exceptions and Stationer; Robert J. Pym, Bag-bearer to the Registrars.

REGISTER OFFICE FOR BANKRUPTCIES, THE, is at the New Bankrupt Office, in Basinghall Street.

REGISTER OFFICE FOR COLONIAL SLAVES. – [see Colonial Slaves Registry Office]

REGISTER OFFICE, of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul’s, is in Carter Lane, Doctors’ Commons, and the hours of attendance are from 9 to 8. John Shephard, Esq., Registrar.

REGISTER OF DEEDS IN THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, OFFICE FOR THE, is in Bell Yard, Temple Bar. This office is open for g�???eneral business from 10 to 3, but for the registering of deeds only from 11 to 1. Its present officers are, Keene Fitzgerald, Thomas Le Blanc, John Mitford, and Henry W. Vincent, Esqrs. Registrars; John Rigge, and John Rigge, Jun., Deputy Registrars; John Rigge, Chief Clerk.

REMEMBRANCER’S, THE CITY, OFFICE, is the last door on the left hand side of Guildhall Yard, going from King Street, up two pair of stairs. The City Remembrancer is an officer, who, on certain days, attends the Lord Mayor. A part of his business is, as his name imports, to remind or remember his lordship, when he is to attend the Courts of Aldermen, Common Council, &c., and to attend the House of Commons during the session of parliament, to see that nothing inimical to the city interests passes.

It is an appointment in the Court of Common Council, and is at present held by Timothy Tyrrell, Esq., who was elected in 1793, and by his son Edward Tyrrell, Esq., who was appointed Deputy Remembrancer in 1827.

REMEMBRANCER’S OFFICE, THE KING’S, for the Court of Exchequer, is in the Exchequer Court, Westminster Hall.

REMEMBRANCER’S, THE, LORD TREASURER’S OFFICE, is in Somerset Place.

REMEMBRANCER’S OF THE TREASURY OFFICE, is also in Somerset Place.

RENNEY’S COURT, Southwark, is a few houses on the right hand side of Webb Street, going from Bermondsey Street.

RENNEY’S RENTS, Southwark, is the sixth turning on the left hand side of the Maze, going from Tooley Street.

RENON’S COURT, Finsbury, is the first turning on the left hand side of Whitecross Place, going from Wilson Street.

REPORT OFFICE, THE, CHANCERY, is in New Buildings, Chancery Lane.

REVELS ROW, Southwark, is at the rear of Blackman Street, by the King’s Bench.

REYNOLD’S COURT, Finsbury, is in Ropemaker’s Street, nearly opposite Type Street.

RICH STREET, Limehouse, is the fourth turning on the right hand side of the Commercial Road, going from the church.

RICHARDS BUILDINGS. – 1. is in Shoe Lane, Fleet Street, the third turning on the right hand from St. Andrew’s Church. – 2. is in Cherry Tree Court, Golden Lane, a few houses on the right from it.

RICHARD’S COURT, St. Giles’s, is the fourth turning on the right hand side of Bainbridge Street, going from the end of Oxford Street.

RICHARD STREET, St. George’s in the East, is the first turning on the right hand side of the Commercial Road, going from Cannon Street Road.

RICHARDSON STREET, Bermondsey, is about a third of a mile on the left hand side of Long Lane, going from St. George’s Church.

RICHBELL COURT, Lamb’s Conduit Street, is about ten houses on the right hand side, going from Red Lion Street.

RICHES COURT, Lime Street, is about five houses on the left hand side, going from Leadenhall Street.

RICHMOND BUILDINGS, Soho, are the fifth turning on the right hand side of Dean Street, going from Oxford Street.

RICHMOND PLACE, LITTLE, extends from the last described to Belgrave Place.

RICHMOND STREET. – 1. is in Princes Street, Soho, the second turning on the left hand from Coventr�???y Street. – 2. is in Ironmonger Row, St. Luke’s, the first turning on the right hand from Old Street. – 3. is in St. James’s.

RICHMOND TERRACE, Whitehall, is on the western side of Privy Gardens, and derives its name from being on the site of the ancient town mansion of the Dukes of Richmond. It is a well built row of mansions, but is commonplace and tasteless in design.

RICKETT’S COURT, Tooley Street, is the first turning on the left hand side of Morgan’s Lane, going from Tooley Street.

RIDING HORSE LANE, Mary-le-bone, is the fifth turning on the left hand side of Great Titchfield Street, going from Oxford Street.

RIVER TERRACE, City Road, is on the east side of the New River, opposite Duncan Terrace.

ROBERT BUILDINGS, Pimlico, is between Belgrave Terrace and Avery Farm Row.

ROBERT’S COURT, Hampstead Road, is about six houses down Charles Street, going from Brook Street, Fitzroy Square.

ROBERT’S PLACE, Mile End Old Town, is the third turning on the right hand side of the Commercial Road, going from Cannon Street Road.

ROBERT STREET, Adelphi, is the first turning on the left hand side of John Street, going from Adam Street.

ROBERT STREET, LITTLE, James Street, Bedford Row, is the first turning on the left from Great James Street.

ROBERT STREET, Christchurch, Surrey, is the first turning parallel eastward, to the Blackfriars’ Road.

ROBINHOOD COURT. – 1. is in Church Lane, St. Giles’s. – 2. is in Newcastle Court, Strand. – 3. is in Shoe Lane, Fleet Street. – 4. is in Bow Lane, Cheapside. – 5. is in Mil Street, Cheapside. – 6. is in Bell Alley, Golden Lane. – 7. is in Mill Lane, Tooley Street.

ROBINHOOD YARD, Holborn, is the first turning on the right hand side of Leather Lane, going from Holborn Hill.

ROBINSON’S PLACE. – 1. is in Shadwell, the last turning on the left hand side of Farmer Street, going from the High Street. – 2. is in Shakspeare’s Walk, Shadwell, the last turning on the right hand from High Street.

ROBINSON’S ROW, Kingsland, is on the left hand side of the Kingsland Road.

ROCHESTER ROW, Westminster, is in Tothill Fields, by the Grey Coat School, near the west end of Great Peter Street.

ROCHESTER STREET, Southwark, is the continuation of York Street, near London Bridge.

ROCK, THE, LIFE INSURANCE OFFICE, on Lives and Survivors Lives, is at No. 14, New Bridge Street, Blackfriars. It was established in 1806, and is under the management of sixteen Directors; of whom Richardson Borrodaile, Esq., M.P. is Chairman; James Brogden, Esq., M.P., Deputy Chairman; and William Stone Lewis, Esq., Actuary.

ROCKINGHAM PLACE, Kent Road, is a few yards on the left hand side going from the Elephant and Castle.

ROSE AND CROWN COURT, Whitechapel, is the first turning on the left hand side of Essex Street.

ROSE AND CROWN YARD, Clerkenwell, is about a furlong on the right hand side of St. John Street, going from Smithfield.

ROSE AND RAINBOW COURT, Aldersgate Street, is about eight houses on the right hand side from Falcon Street.

ROSEMARY LANE, Tower Hill, is near the north east corner of the square and extends from the bottom of the Minories to Wellclose Square.

ROTHERHITHE, was anciently a village on the south east corner of the metropolis, though it is now joined to Southwark, and as it is situated along the south bank of the Thames, it is chiefly inhabited by captains of merchant ships, pilots, sailors and such like people.

ROTHERHITHE CHARITY SCHOOL, is situated on the south side of Rotherhithe Church.

ROTHERHITHE STAIRS, are about a furlong westward of the church.

ROTHERHITHE STREET, is parallel to the Thames, and extends from West Lane to Lower Queen Street, about one mile and a half in length.

ROTHERHITHE WALL, Bermondsey, is parallel to the Thames, and extends from Mill Stairs on the east side of St. Saviour’s Dock to West Lane.

ROTTON ROW, Goswell Street, is a few houses southward of Old Street, to which it leads.

ROUND COURT. – 1. is in Clerkenwell, a few houses on the left hand side of Onslow Street, going from Mutton Lane. – 2. is in Butler’s Alley, Moorgate, a few yards from Moor Lane. – 3. is in Shacklewell Street, Bethnal Green, three houses on the right hand side, going from No. 18, Tyson Street.

ROWLAND’S ROW, Stepney Green, is part of the west side of the green, a few houses on the right hand side going from Assembly Row, Mile End Road.

ROWLANDSON’S COURT, Russell Street, Bermondsey, is the first turning on the left hand from Bermondsey Street towards Dockhead

ROYAL TERRACE, Adelphi. – [see Adelphi Terrace]

ROYAL COURT, or ROYAL OAK COURT, Golden Square, is three houses on the right hand side of Beak Street, Regent’s Street.

ROYAL ACADEMY OF ARTS, THE, is in the western wing of the street front of Somerset Place, This institution was established by royal charter in 1768, under the especial patronage of King George III., who interested himself personally in its success. In the apartments of this academy is an annual exhibition of the works of its members, to which every other artist of talent is invited to send their works. It generally opens the first Monday in May, and closes at the beginning of July. The admission is one shilling, and the catalogue one shilling.

There are within the walls of this academy, schools for drawing and modelling from the antique, and the living model, a school of painting, a library, which is open every Monday from 10 to 4, to the students generally, and every Monday and Thursday evenings from 6 to 8 for the architectural students only.

Gold medals are given biennially for the best historical painting, the best design in sculpture, and the best design in architecture, with silver medals and books, to the best drawing and model from the life, and for the best architectural drawing of an existing building taken from actual measurements. The subjects are always given by the Academicians. The gold medals confer the honour of being perpetual students, and of travelling alternately, at the expense of the academy to Rome for three years. The silver medals of these years, confer the honour of privileged or perpetual students. Silver medals and books are given in the alternate years, for the best copies in the school of painting, the best drawings and models in the life academy, and the best architectural drawings of existing buildings, from actual measurements, the subjects of whi�???ch are proposed by the academy.

Lectures are also delivered in the winter season on subjects connected with the fine arts.

The present patrons, members, and professors are, the King, Patron; Sir Martin Archer Shee, Knt., President; John Soane, Esq., Professor of Architecture; J. M. W. Turner, Esq., of Perspective; Thomas Phillips, Esq., of Painting; Richard Westmacott, Esq., of Sculpture; the Lord Bishop of Winchester, Honorary Professor of Ancient Literature; the Lord Bishop of London, Honorary Chaplain; Prince Hoare, Esq., Secretary for Foreign Correspondence; Sir Walter Scott, Bart., Antiquary; H. Howard, Esq., Secretary, and Wm. Hilton, Esq., Keeper. There are forty Academicians; twenty-four Associates, from whom the Academicians are always elected, and six Associate Engravers.

ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC, THE, is in Tenterden Street, Hanover Square, and was established in 1822 for the cultivation of the art of music, among natives of England. The pupils are instructed in every branch of music, the Latin, French, Italian and English languages, writing, arithmetic and dancing.

It is under the patronage and management of the King, Patron; their R.H. the Dukes of Cumberland and Cambridge, and Prince Leopold, Vice Patrons; the Duke of Devonshire, President; four Vice Presidents; twenty four Directors; the Rev. Frederick Hamilton, M.A., Chaplain and Superintendant; Mrs. Stiff, Governess; William Crotch, Mus. Doc., Principal; C. Potter, Esq., Conductor of the Orchestra, and Mr. William P. Smith, Clerk.

ROYAL AMPHITHEATRE. – [see Amphitheatre]

ROYAL CUMBERLAND FREEMASON’S SCHOOL. – [see Freemason’s Charity]

ROYAL DISPENSARY FOR DISEASES OF THE EAR. – [see Ear, Royal Dispensary]

ROYAL ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Somerset Place. – [see Antiquaries, Society of]

ROYAL COBURG THEATRE. – [see Coburg Theatre]

ROYAL COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS. – [see College or Physicians]

ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS. – [see College of Surgeons]

ROYAL COURT, Horselydown Lane, is three houses on the left hand side of the lane going from Shad Thames.

ROYAL EXCHANGE, Cornhill, is on the south east corner of the Bank of England. This fine public building was founded by Sir Thomas Gresham, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, and was first opened in November, 1567 It was originally called the Bourse, but on the visit of the Queen and her court to the city, on the 23rd of January, 1570, when her Majesty dined with Sir Thomas at his mansion, in Bishopsgate Street, she caused it to be proclaimed by a herald and trumpet as “The Royal Exchange.”

Sir Thomas Gresham bequeathed it at his death to his widow, and after her decease to the Mayor and Citizens of London, and to the Mercers’ Company; directing the rents to support lectures on the sciences. This building was destroyed by the great fire of 1666, and was rebuilt nearly upon its former plan, by Sir Christopher Wren. Mr. Brayley, in his account of this edifice, in Brittons Public Edifices of London, (page 290, ) says that Mr. Edward Jerman was its architect. My opinion is still that Wren was the architect, and Mr. Edward Jerman, who, I believe, was surveyor to the city, overlooked the works. The tower, I have reason to think, was Hawksmoors.

The new exchange was quickly rebuilt, with statues of the Kings, and of Sir Thomas Gresha�???m, as formerly, at an expense of nearly £100,000. It was opened to the public on the 28th of September, 1669, only three years after its destruction.

On the day appointed for the opening the Royal Exchange, a committee of citizens and merchants assembled to meet the King, (Charles II.) who was expected to have performed the ceremony in person. His Majesty, however, did not come, but the Lord Mayor, Sir William Turner, perambulated its arcades twice, accompanied by the aldermen, the other city authorities, and the committee, and congratulated the congregated assemblage of merchants on having their Exchange again. Its destruction and re-erection were thus recorded by one of the philos of the day.

Hoc Greshamii peristylum,
Gentiis commerciis sacrum,
Flammis extinctum, 1666,
Augustius è cinere resurrexit 1669.
Williemo Turnero, Milite Prætore.

It has been recently most substantially repaired, and a new clock tower, erected from the designs, and under the superintendence of George Smith, Esq., architect to the Mercers’ Company, at the joint expense of the Corporation of London and the Mercers’ Company.

The present Gresham Committee is the Lord Mayor, and Aldermen Thompson, Farebrother, and Winchester, Deputy Oldham, Deputy Blacket, Deputy Carter, and Messrs. Butterworth, Shearman, Smith, Howell and Cawthorn, members of the Common Council.

The present Gresham Professors are, the Rev. Henry Parker, M.A., Divinity; the Rev. Wm. Jocelyn Palmer, M.A., Civil Law; the Rev. Peter Sandiford, D.D., Astronomy; Richard J. S. Stevens, Music; the Rev. Samuel Birch, D.D., Geometry; the Rev. Edward Owen, M.A., Rhetoric; Christopher Stanger, M.D., Physic.

ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE OFFICES, THE, are over the western side of the Royal Exchange, and in Pall Mall. This company was established in 1720, for assuring buildings, goods and ships from fire, also for assuring lives, and granting annuities. It was established by act of parliament at the same time with the London Assurance Company, and these, now flourishing corporations, met so little encouragement at first, that Maitland, the historian says, the crown was obliged to remit most part of the money due to it under the act. This company is under the management of William Vaughan, Esq., Governor; Pascoe Grenfell, Esq., Sub Governor; Isaac Solly, Esq., Deputy Governor, and twenty-four Directors; Samuel Penning, Esq., Secretary; John Burford, Esq., Cashier; Matthew Ward, Superintendant of Fire Office; William Hart, Accomptant; John D. Bayley, Life Accomptant; John Stevens, and Wm. C. Lockner, Esqrs., Surveyors of Buildings.

ROYAL HOSPITAL ROW, Chelsea, extends from the Hospital gate to Grosvenor Row.

ROYAL HUMANE SOCIETY, THE, No. 29, Bridge Street, Blackfriars, was established in 1774, by Dr. Cogan, with the cooperation of Dr. Hawes, for the recovery of the apparently Dead by Drowning, or by the many other causes of suffocation. It is under the patronage and management of the King, Patron; the Duke of Northumberland, President; the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Duke of Wellington, and thirty others, Vice Presidents; Benjamin Hawes, Esq., Treasurer; the Rev. Henry Fly, D.D., R. Yates, D.D., F. G. Ackland, D D., and J. Jackson, M.A., Chaplains; John Frost, Esq., Secretary; H. Critchaid, Collector.

ROYAL INFIRMARY FOR DISEASES OF THE EYE, No. 6, Cork Street, Burlington Gardens, was instituted in 1804, at the instance of Sir Walter Waller Phipps, Bart., an eminent oculist, who obtained the patronage of George III., and a large list of the nobility and gentry, for the relief of the Poor who were afflicted with D�???iseases of Eye. It is now conducted by the King, Patron; the Duke of Somerset, President; the Dukes of Bedford and Devonshire, and six others, Vice Presidents; Henry Alexander, Esq., Operating Surgeon, and Surgeon in Ordinary; E. A. Brande, Esq., Visiting Apothecary; Sir Henry Halford, Bart., M.D., and Edward Fryar, M.D., Consulting Physicians; Robert Midford, Esq., Treasurer; Henry Alexander, Esq., Secretary; and Mr. J. Orlton, No. 98, Great Surrey Street, Blackfriars’ Bridge, Collector.

ROYAL INSTITUTION OF GREAT BRITAIN, THE, Albemarle Street, Piccadilly, was instituted in 1800, by a charter of incorporation, principally through the exertions of Count Rumford, whose useful discoveries have rendered his name deservedly celebrated. The house of the institution is spacious, and well adapted to the purposes for which it is used. It has an extensive library, reading rooms, laboratories, an admirable theatre for lectures and apartments for philosophical experiments.

Among its principal lecturers are, John Brande, Esq., F.R.S., Michael Faraday, Esq., F.R.S., John Soane, Esq., R.A., T. Phillips, Esq., R.A., Thomas Campbell, Esq., &c.

ROYAL NATIONAL INSTITUTION, THE, for the Preservation of Life from Shipwreck, No. 18, Austin Friars, was established on the 4th of March 1824, under the patronage of the late King, George IV., and extends its aid to the subjects of all nations, both in war and peace.

Its present officers are, the King, Patron; their R.H. the Dukes of Sussex, Cambridge, Gloucester and Prince Leopold, Vice Patrons; Thomas Wilson, Esq., Chairman of the Committee of Management; Richard Perceval, Jun., Esq., Treasurer; Thomas Edwards, Esq., Secretary.

ROYAL SOCIETY, THE, Somerset Place, originated about the year 1648, in the meetings of a few scientific friends in the rooms of Dr. (afterwards Sir William) Petty, the founder of the present noble family of the Lansdownes. Among these illustrious men, were Drs. Seth Ward, Bathurst, Willis, Wren (afterwards Sir Christopher). During the protectorate of Cromwell, they continued their meetings at Gresham College, after the Wednesday and Thursday lectures of Drs. Wren and Rook, till they were broken up in 1658, when the scientific stillness of the college was converted into the noise and blustering of a barrack canteen.

They were finally incorporated by a royal charter from Charles II., bearing date the 15th of July, 1662. This charter was drawn by Sir Christopher Wren, who was always an active member, and the second president. He Was succeeded by his friend, Sir Isaac Newton, and the chair has always been filled by men illustrious for talent. Among the later presidents, are Sir Joseph Banks, Sir Humphrey Davy, and Davies Gilbert, Esq., all names of note.

The meetings of the society are from the beginning of November till the end of Trinity term, every Thursday evening, from half, past eight till nearly ten. It is at present under the management of, the King, Patron; H.R.H, the Duke of Sussex, President; Sir Everard Home, Bart., J. F. W. Herschell, Esq., and Captain Henry Kater, R.N., Vice Presidents; John Pond, Esq., Astronomer Royal; Captain Henry Kater, R.N., Treasurer; Peter M. Roget, M.D., and Edward Sabine, Esqs., Secretaries; James Hudson, Esq., Assistant Secretary and Librarian.

ROYAL SOCIETY OF LITERATURE, THE, No. 2, Parliament Street, was established in 1823, under the especial patronage of his late Majesty, George IV., and the immediate superintendence of Dr. Burgess, Bishop of Salisbury. The sole object of this society is the advancement of literature, and it is under the patronage and management of, the King, Patron; the Bishop of Salisbury, President; the Duke of Newcastle, �???the Marquess of Lansdowne, and eight other Vice Presidents; the Bishop of Bristol, Lord Kenyon and twelve other gentlemen, Council; Arch. E. Impey, Esq., Treasurer; the Rev. Henry H. Baber, Librarian; the Rev. Richard Cattermole, Secretary.

ROYAL SOCIETY OF MUSICIANS, THE, for the benefit of Decayed Musicians, their Widows and Orphans, was established in 1738, and incorporated in 1790. It is patronized and conducted by, the King, Patron; H.R.H. the Duke of Cambridge, President; H.R.H. the Duke of Cumberland, the Archbishop of York, the, Duke of Devonshire, and three other noblemen, Vice President; the Rev. G. Nicholas, D.C.L., Chaplain; W. G. Maton, M.D., and R. Batty, M.D., Physicians; Anthony White, Esq., Surgeon; Henry Condell, Esq., Secretary; and Mr. Matthew Simcock, No. 2, Osnaburgh Row, Pimlico, Collector.

ROYAL OAK COURT. – 1. is in Ratcliffe, Broad Street, near Cock Hill. – 2. is in Park Street, Southwark, the second turning on the right hand side, going from the Borough Market. – 3. is in Beak Street, Regent Street. – 4. is in Broad Street, Ratcliffe. – 5. is in Kent Street, Southwark, about thirty houses on the right hand side, going from St. George’s Church.

ROYAL OAK LANE, Southwark, is the first turning on the left hand side of Maid Lane, going from Park Street.

ROYAL OAK RENTS, Southwark, are about fourteen houses on the right hand side of Kent Street, going in the rear of St. George’s Church.

ROYAL OAK WALK, Hoxton, is the fourth turning on the right hand side of Haberdashers’ Walk, going from Old Street Road.

ROYAL OAK YARD. – 1. is in Kent Street, Southwark, about twenty houses on the right hand side, going from behind St. George’s Church. – 2. is in Bermondsey Street, about thirteen houses on the left hand side, going from the church towards Tooley Street.

RUDDICK’S BUILDINGS, Finsbury, are in Long Alley, opposite the west end of Skinner Street.

RUMBAL’S COURT, Finsbury, is the second turning on the right side in Long Alley.

RUPERT STREET, Haymarket, is about fourteen houses on the left hand side, going from Piccadilly.

RUPERT STREET, Goodman’s Fields, is the first turning parallel eastward to Lemon Street.

RUSSELL BUILDINGS, Wapping, are on the west side of the entrance to the London Docks.

RUSSELL COURT. – 1. is in Cleveland Row, St. Jame’s, three houses on the right hand side going from St. James’s Street. – 2. is in Drury Lane. – 3. is in Rosemary Lane. – 4. is in Ratcliffe Highway.

RUSSELL INSTITUTION, THE, Great Coram Street. The building wherein this society is carried on, was built originally, in 1800, as a suite of assembly rooms, but was purchased and converted to its present more intellectual purpose in 1808. It consists of about seven hundred proprietors and subscribers. Its present officers are, H.R.H. the Duke of Gloucester, President; the Duke of Bedford, the Marquess of Lansdowne and three other gentlemen, Vice Presidents; Henry Storks, Esq., Chairman; seven Managers; and E. W. Brayley, F.A.S., Secretary,

RUSSELL MEWS. – 1. is in Howland Street, Tottenham Court Road, and extends to London Street. – 2. is in Keppel Street, Russell Square. – 3. is in Cleveland Row, St. James’s.

RUSSELL PLACE. – 1. is in Little Coram Street, Tavistock Square, about the middle of the east side. – 2. is in Fitzroy Square,�??? at the south east corner, leading into Charlotte Street. – 3. is in Bow Street, Covent Garden, nearly opposite the theatre.

RUSSELL SQUARE, is situated to the northward of Bloomsbury Square, and is built on the site of the gardens of the ancient town mansion of the Dukes of Bedford. It is one of the largest Squares in the metropolis, being nearly 700 feet square. The garden in the centre was laid out by the late Humphrey Repton, Esq.; on the south side of which is a bronze statue of Francis, Duke of Bedford, by Richard Westmacott, Esq., R.A., looking down Bedford Place, towards another by the same artist, of Charles James Fox.

RUSSELL SQUARE and GREAT PORTLAND STREET. The District Society for visiting and relieving the Sick and Distressed Poor at their own Habitations, is at No. 2, Mabledon Place, and was established in 1814.

RUSSELL STREET. – 1. GREAT, is in Bloomsbury Square, at the north west corner, extending to Tottenham Court Road. – 2. LITTLE, is in Bloomsbury, the first street parallel southward to part of the preceding. – 3. LITTLE, is in Drury Lane, on the north side the theatre. – 4. GREAT, is in Covent Garden, the continuation of the preceding to the east side of Covent Garden. – 5. is in Bermondsey Street, near the third of a mile on the left hand from Tooley Street. – 6. UPPER, is also in Bermondsey Street, opposite the last described. – 7. is in Rotherhithe or Greenland Dock, the continuation of Trinity Street to the Dock.

RUSSIA COURT, Honey Lane Market, is on the north side of Russia Row, and leads into Milk Street.

RUSSIA ROW, Milk Street, Cheapside, is on the north side of Honey Lane Market.

RUST’S BUILDINGS, Southwark, is at the bottom of Palmer’s Rents, Snow’s Fields.

RUTLAND COURT, Goswell Street, is the first turning on the right hand side of Glasshouse Street.

RUTLAND PLACE, Upper Thames Street, is on the eastern side of Puddle Dock.

RUTLAND YARD, Upper Thames Street, is opposite the preceding.

RYDER’S COURT. – 1. is in Leicester Square, two or three houses on the left hand from the north east corner of the square. – 2. is in Little Rider Street, St. James’s, a few houses on the right hand from St. James’s Street.

RYDER’S MEWS, St. James’s, is on the north side of Great Ryder Street, between Duke Street and Bury Street.

RYDER STREET, GREAT, St. James’s, nearly opposite the last described.

RYDER STREET, LITTLE, St. James’s Street, about the middle of the east side, and extends to Bury Street.

RYE LOAF COURT, Ratcliffe, turns off at No. 119, Cock Hill.

S

SACKVILLE STREET, Piccadilly, is nearly opposite St. James’s Church.

SADLERS HALL, Cheapside, is on the north side, between Foster Lane and Gutter Lane. It is a small but very handsome hall. The fraternity of Sadlers is very ancient, as appears from a convention between them and the Dean and Chapter of St. Martins-le-Grand, about the time of Richard I. They were incorporated by a charter of Edward I., under the title of “The Wardens or Keepers and Commonalty of the Mystery or Art of Saddlers of London.” It is a livery company and is the twenty-fifth in the list of city companies.

S�??ADLER’S WELLS THEATRE, is situated near the New River Head, about the third of a mile on the left hand side of the Islington Road, going from the north end of St. John Street towards Islington. Its performances are limited to burlettas, ballets, pantomimes, melodramas and such like, and is open from Easter Monday to October.

SAFFRON COURT, Great Saffron Hill, is about eight houses on the left hand side, going from Hatton Wall.

SAFFRON HILL, GREAT, Holborn Bridge, is the continuation of Field Lane.

SAFFRON HILL, LITTLE, is the continuation of the preceding to Ray Street, Clerkenwell.

SAFFRON PLACE, Great Saffron Hill, is about four houses southward of Castle Street.

SAFFRON STREET, Great Saffron Hill, extends from Peter Street to Lilly Street.

SAILORS’ HOME. – [see Brunswick Maritime Establishment]

SALCOMBE PLACE, Regent’s Park, is the first turning on the left hand side of York Gate, going from the New Road, opposite Mary-le-bone Church and is at the rear of York Terrace.

SALISBURY COURT, Fleet Street, is the second coach turning on the left hand side, going from Bridge Street. It derives its name from the palace of the Bishop of Salisbury, afterwards the town mansion of the Earl of Dorset, which stood adjacent.

SALISBURY LANE, Bermondsey or Rotherhithe Wall, is about a furlong below St. Saviour’s Dock.

SALISBURY MEWS, New Road, Mary-le-bone, is the first turning on the left hand side of Great Quebec Street, going from the New Road.

SALISBURY PLACE, Mary-le-bone, forms part of the south side of the New Road.

SALISBURY PLACE, Bermondsey or Rotherhithe Wall, is the second turning on the left hand side of Salisbury Street.

SALISBURY SQUARE, Fleet Street, is near the entrance to Salisbury Court.

SALISBURY STREET, Strand, is about half a mile on the left hand side, going from Temple Bar. It is so called from the town mansion of the Earls of Salisbury, which formerly occupied its site.

SALISBURY STREET, Bermondsey, or Rotherhithe Wall, is about the third of a mile below St. Saviour’s Dock, opposite Fountain Stairs.

SALMON’S LANE, Ratcliffe, is at the north end of Whitehorse Street.

SALMON’S PLACE, Limehouse, is about a furlong on the left hand side of Salmon’s Lane, going from the Commercial Road.

SALMON AND BALL COURT, Bunhill Row, is opposite the burying ground, and leads into Chequer Alley.

SALTERS’ COMPANY’S ALMS HOUSES, THE, are in Monkwell Street, about twelve houses on the east side adjoining Hart Street. They were founded by Sir Nicholas Ambrose, in 1578, and left to the guardianship of the Salters’ Company, for the occupation of seven poor men and five poor widows. After the fire of London, they were rebuilt at the charge of the company, who now keep them in repair.

SALTER’S COURT. – 1. is in Bow Lane, about fourteen houses on the right hand side, going from Bow Church, Cheapside. – 2. is in the Hackney Road, the first turning on the left hand side, going from Shoreditch Church.

SALTERS’ HALL COURT, Cannon Street, is on the north side, by the corner �???of St. Swithin’s Church, and leads up to Salters’ Hall.

SALTERS’ HALL, Swithin’s Lane, Cannon Street, is a handsome newly built structure of the Ionic order designed by George Smith, Esq.

The company of Salters appears to be of great antiquity from the grant of a livery by Richard II., in 1394; but they were not incorporated before the first year of Elizabeth, in 1558. They have considerable possessions, out of which they pay large sums annually to charitable uses.

SALTER’S RENTS, Hackney Road, are the second turning on the left hand from Shoreditch Church.

SALUTATION COURT. – 1. is in St. Giles’s, a few houses on the right hand side of Broad Street, going from Monmouth Street towards Drury Lane. – 2. is in Lower Thames Street, nearly opposite Billingsgate.

SAMARITAN SOCIETY, THE, is an appendage to the London Hospital, and was founded in 1791, for patients of that charity, whose relief was not within its general regulations. Its office is held at the London Hospital, and its present officers are, the Rev. John Parsons, D.D., Chairman; C. Richardson, Jun., Esq., Treasurer; the Rev. W. Valentine, Almoner; G. Dunn, Esq., Honorary Secretary.

SAMBROOK COURT, Basinghall Street, is nearly opposite the church.

SAMPSON’S GARDENS, Wapping, is the continuation of Globe Street.

SAMUEL STREET, Bethnal Green, is about the third of a mile on the left hand side of Church Street, going from Shoreditch.

SAMUEL STREET, Spitalfields, is the continuation of Booth Street.

SAMUEL STREET, St. George’s in the East, extends from John Street to James Street.

SAND COURT or YARD, Clerkenwell, is the first turning on the right hand side of Turnmill Street, a few yards from the Sessions’ House.

SANDER’S BUILDINGS, Finsbury, is the third turning on the left hand side of Horseshoe Alley, going from Wilson Street.

SANDER’S COURT. – 1. is in Westminster, on the west side of Perkin’s Rents, Great Peter Street. – 2. is in St. John Street, Clerkenwell, and nearly opposite Corporation Row.

SANDY’S ROW or STREET, Bishopsgate Street Without, is about six houses on the right hand side of Widegate Street, going from Bishopsgate Street.

SARACEN’S HEAD YARD, Camomile Street, is the second turning on the right hand from nearly opposite Bishopsgate Church.

SARAH STREET, Bethnal Green, is the continuation of Nicols Row.

SARDINIAN CHAPEL, Duke Street, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, is a Roman Catholic chapel, a few houses on the left hand from No. 52, Lincoln’s Inn Fields.

SASH COURT, Finsbury, is the first turning on the right hand side of Wilson Street.

SATCHWELL’S RENTS, Bethnal Green, is on the west side of Thorold Square, Church Street.

SAVAGE COURT, Bishopsgate, is about seven houses on the left hand side of Widegate Street, going from Bishopsgate Without.

SAVAGE GARDENS, Crutched Friars, is about a furlong on the right hand from Mark Lane.

SAVILLE BUILDINGS, Aldgate, is ten houses eastward of the church.

�??? SAVILLE BUILDINGS, Stepney, is the continuation of Pleasant Row.

SAVILLE PASSAGE, Burlington Gardens, is the north continuation of Saville Street, under the archway to Mill Street.

SAVILLE PLACE, Lambeth, is the west continuation of Canterbury Place.

SAVILLE STREET or ROW, Burlington Gardens, the first turning westward and parallel to part of Regent Street.

St. SAVIOUR, Southwark, or St. Mary Overies, the parochial Church of, is situated a little to the westward of the southern end of London Bridge. Its latter name appears to be a corruption of St. Mary o’ th’ Ferry. It is a church of great antiquity and beauty, is built in the conventual form, and was founded before the conquest, but was principally rebuilt in the fourteenth century; since which period it has undergone many extensive reparations. The tower which is square, and is surmounted by four pinnacles, was repaired in 1818 and 1819, and the architectural decorations of the interior of the choir have been since that time restored in conformity to the original design, by Mr. George Gwilt It is now undergoing further reparations, under the direction of Mr. Wallace.

In this fine building, which is perhaps the largest parish church in the Kingdom, are monuments to the memories of our celebrated poet John Gower, who was a great benefactor to this church in the reigns of Edward III., and Richard II., of William of Wykeham, the architect of Windsor Castle, of Bishop Andrews, the Bishop of Winchester, of the family of the Austins, of “notified Abraham Newland,” and the dramatists Fletcher and Massinger who lie buried in one grave.

At the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII., this church was made parochial, and the advowson was sold by him to the inhabitants of St. Margaret’s on the Hill, and St. Mary’s, at which period it received the name of St. Saviour’s. The living is a rectory in the gift of the parish, who appoint two chaplains to the office. It is in the county and archdeaconry of Surrey, and in the diocese of Winchester. The present chaplains are, the Rev. William Mann, M.A., and the Rev. William Harrison, D.D.

St. SAVIOUR’S CHURCH YARD, Southwark, is on the right hand side of High Street, going from London Bridge.

St. SAVIOURS DOCK, Horselydown, is about three quarters of a mile below London Bridge.

St. SAVIOUR’S SCHOOL, Southwark, is in St. Saviour’s Churchyard: it was founded by the parish, and confirmed by letters patent by Queen Elizabeth, in 1562.

SAVOY, THE, in the Strand, is a district so called, nearly opposite Catherine Street, and to the westward of Waterloo Bridge, between the Strand and the Thames. It is on the site of an ancient palace, built by Peter, Earl of Savoy and Richmond, in 1245, and afterwards transferred to the friars of Mountjoy, of whom Queen Eleanor, wife of Henry III., purchased it for her son, Henry, Duke of Lancaster, who, in 1328, enlarged and beautified it, so that it exceeded in magnificence every other structure in the Kingdom. It was in this palace, that John, King of France resided, when a prisoner in England, in 1357.

This edifice, with all its furniture, was burned by the Kentish rebels, out of pique to John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster; but the ground devolving to the crown, Henry VII. began to rebuild it as an hospital for distressed poor. Henry VIII. granted it in 1513, to the Bishop of Winchester and others, executors of his father’s will, and constituted them a body corporate and politic, under the name of “The Hospital of King Henry VII., late King of Engla�???nd, of the Savoy.”

It was suppressed in the reign of Edward VI., and its revenues, amounting to £529. 15s. 7d. per annum, and all its furniture, given to the citizens of London towards the new foundations of Bridewell and St. Thomas’s hospitals.

The Savoy became again the property of the crown, an act of resumption having passed in the 4th and 6th of William and Mary. It is now nearly all destroyed, but the ancient chapel is still remaining. – [see St. Mary-le-Savoy, and St. John the Baptist, in the Savoy]

SAVOY STREET STEPS, THE, are a flight of steps on the left hand side of the Strand, near Beaufort Buildings, which lead into the Savoy.

SAWYER’S COURT, Strand, is about five houses on the right hand side of Clement’s Lane, going from Clare Market.

SAWYER’S or SAYER’S BUILDINGS, Spitalfields, is in Phoenix Street, between Hope Street and Grey Eagle Street.

SCALLOP COURT, Doctors’ Commons, is two houses on the left hand side of Great Carter Lane, going from Creed Lane.

SCHOOLS, for the various, see their separate initials, as Charter House, Merchant Taylors’, St. Paul’s, &c.

SCHOOL FOR FEMALE ORPHANS OF THE CLERGY, is next door to the chapel, in Chapel Street, Paddington.

SCHOOL FOR THE INDIGENT BLIND, St. George’s Fields. – [see Blind, School for]

SCHOOL FOR LICENSED VICTUALLERS, FRIENDLY SOCIETY, Upper Kennington Lane. – [see Licensed Victuallers]

SCHOOL HOUSE LANE, Ratcliffe, is the first turning on the left hand side of Cock Hill, going from Shadwell High Street.

SCHOOL HOUSE YARD. – 1. is in Clerkenwell, about fourteen houses on the right hand side of Aylesbury Street, going from St. John Street. – 2. is in Ironmonger Row, St. Luke’s opposite the east side of the church.

SCLATER STREET, Bethnal Green, is the third turning on the right hand side of Brick Lane, going from Church Street.

SCOONER’S ALLEY, Wapping Wall, is two or three houses eastward of Star Street.

SCOTCH COURT, Parker’s Lane, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, is the first turning on the right hand side of Cross Lane, going towards Holborn.

SCOTLAND YARD, GREAT, Charing Cross or Whitehall, is opposite the Admiralty, and derives its name from a magnificent palace built there, for the reception of the Scottish monarchs whenever they visited this metropolis.

SCOTLAND YARD, MIDDLE, Whitehall, is two houses south from the last described.

SCOTLAND YARD, LITTLE, adjoins the preceding.

SCOTT’S YARD. – 1. is in Bush Lane, Cannon Street, about eight houses on the right hand from Cannon Street – 2. is in Whitecross Street, St. Luke’s, about the middle of the west side.

SCOTTISH CORPORATION OFFICE, THE, is at the upper end of Crane Court, Fleet Street, This charitable institution owes its origin to James Kinniar, a native of Scotland, and a merchant of London, who, on recovering from a long and dangerous illness, gave part of his estate towards the relief of the aged and necessitous of his country people in the metropolis, and prevailed upon others of his countrymen to join him in his benevolent plan. They were incorporated �???by charter of Charles II. in 1665 and 1667, under the name of “The Scots Hospital of King Charles II.” and have been since re-incorporated and their powers enlarged in 1775, for the relief of Natives of Scotland, who have acquired no parochial settlement.

Its present officers are, the King, President, who, when Duke of Clarence, often presided; the Duke of Buccleugh and five other noblemen, Vice Presidents; the Hon. William Fraser, Treasurer; Robert Auld, Esq., Secretary; two Chaplains; four Physicians; two Surgeons; twenty four members as a Committee for Relief. There is also a Committee of the Kinloch Bequest, a trust to the Hospital for Annuities to 500 Soldiers and Sailors, wounded in the service, of which Admiral Sir P. Malcolm is President; thirteen Vice Presidents; and the Waterloo Subscription, of which Alexander Baring and four other Members are Treasurers; John Clark, Esq., Secretary; and Mr. D. W. Lloyd, Clerk; Office, Winchester House, Old Broad Street.

SEA COAL LANE, Skinner Street, is about twelve houses on the left hand side of Fleet Lane, going from Farringdon Street. Stowe derives its name from the Lime-burners that formerly occupied its site, using sea coal for their purposes.

SEAMEN’S HOSPITAL, THE, founded in 1821, and is kept on board of His Majesty’s ship Grampus, a fifty gun ship, given by the King to the Society. It is moored, by permission of the Navigation Committee, off Greenwich, and is established for the relief of Sick and Distressed Seamen of all Nations arriving in the Port of London. The office is at No. 19, Bishopsgate Street, and its present officers are, the King, Patron; Prince Leopold, Vice Patron; Viscount Melville, President; Captain Wm. Bowles, R.N., Chairman; John Labouchere, Esq., Treasurer; Edward Seymour, M.D., Consulting Physician; J. Roupell, M.P., Visiting Physician; D. M’Creery, Esq., Superintendent; James Y. Thorburn, Esq., Surgeon; the Rev. David Jones, Chaplain; Richard Harley, Esq., Secretary and Collector. No. 32, Upper Stamford Street.

SECONDARIES’ OFFICE, THE, is at No. 5, Basinghall Street, and the hours of attendance are from 12 to 2, and 3 to 6. The present two Secondaries are, P. W. Crowther and William James, Esqs.

SECONDARIES’ OFFICE OF PLEAS FOR THE COURT OF KING’S BENCH, is in King’s Bench Walk. The hours of business are from 11 to 2, and 5 to 7, in Term; and 10 to 12, and 1 to 3, in Vacation. The present Secondary is Peregrine Dealtry, Esq.

SECRETARY OF BANKRUPTS’ OFFICE, THE, is in Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane. The hours of business are from 10 to 3, and from 6 to 8. The present officers are, Francis Barlow, Esq., Secretary of Bankrupts; William Barber, Deputy Secretary.

SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICE, THE, for the Home Department, is at Whitehall, for the Foreign Department, in Downing Street, and for Colonies, in Downing Street. The arrangements, consequent on the change of the Ministry not being completed at the printing of this sheet, cannot be inserted.

SEETHING LANE, Great Tower Street, is the first turning east, parallel to part of Mark Lane.

St. SEPULCHRE’S CHARITY SCHOOL, is in Ball Court, Giltspur Street.

St. SEPULCHRE’S, the Church of, is situated on Snow Hill, at the corner of Giltspur Street, and is so named in commemoration of the Holy Sepulchre at Jerusalem. This church is supposed to have been founded about 1100, at which time a particular devotion was paid to the Holy Sepulchre. It was so decayed in the reign of Edward IV. as to require re-building. In the reign of Henry I. it was given by the Bishop of Salisbury t�???o the Prior and Canons of St. Bartholomew, in Smithfield. At the dissolution of that ministry it came to the crown, till it was granted by James I. to Francis Phipps and others. After which the rectory, with its appurtenances, was purchased by the parishioners, and the advowson of the vicarage, by the President and Fellows of St. John’s College, Oxford.

The Church was much damaged by the great fire of 1666, when it was repaired, and the present ugly and inappropriate arched ceiling introduced, which it will be well to remove, and restore to its former beautiful construction whenever another repair be necessary. It is a vicarage, in the city, archdeaconry and diocese of London, and in the patronage of St. John’s College, Oxford. The present rector is the Rev. John Natt, who was instituted in 1630.

SERJEANT’S INN, Fleet Street, is about fifty houses on the right hand side of the street, going from Temple Bar. It was formerly an Inn of Court, but is now private property. It consists of a small quadrangle of handsome dwelling houses, principally occupied by barristers and solicitors. On the eastern side is the handsome edifice belonging to the Amicable Society (which see) designed by Mr. Adam.

SERJEANT’S INN, Chancery Lane, is four houses on the right hand side, going from Fleet Street. It is the only Inn now remaining for the judges and serjeants of the law. It consists of two courts, a small hall, chambers and offices for the judges.

SERLE STREET, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, is at the south east corner, and extends to Carey Street.

SERMON LANE, Doctors’ Commons, is the first turning on the right hand side of Little Carter Lane.

SESSIONS’ HOUSE, Old Bailey, is about the middle of the east side, nearly adjoining Newgate, and is used for the trial of criminals belonging to the City of London.

SESSIONS’ HOUSE, NEW, adjoins the preceding, and was erected in 1824, for the purpose of facilitating the despatch of public business, when the prisoners are very numerous.

SESSIONS’ HOUSE, THE, Clerkenwell Green, is a public building used for similar purposes as the preceding, and for the meetings of the magistracy of the County of Middlesex. It is sometimes called Hicks’s Hall, from an ancient building in the middle of St. John Street, formerly used for these purposes, and which had been given in 1611, to the County, by Sir Baptist Hicks. This building having become ruinous, the County obtained an act of parliament in 1779, to build a new one, which was done on the present site, from the designs of Mr. Rogers. The first stone was laid on the 20th of August 1779, and it was opened for business in 1782.

SESSIONS’ HOUSE, Southwark, is on St. Margaret’s Hill, but it is more commonly called the Town Hall. It is used for the magistracy of the Borough of Southwark, petty sessions, and similar business.

SESSIONS’ HOUSE FOR SURREY, is in Newington Causeway, adjoining the County Gaol in Horsemonger Lane, and nearly opposite the eastern end of the Borough Road.

SEVEN DIALS, THE, St. Giles’s, is an area wherein seven streets meet, near Broad Street. It is so called, because there was formerly a column in the centre, on the summit of which were seven sundials, facing each of the streets that radiate from it.

SEVEN STAR ALLEY, Ratcliffe Highway, is about sixteen houses on the right hand side of the way, going from Old Gravel Lane.

SEVEN STAR COURT. – 1. is in Whitecross Street, St. Lu�???ke’s, three houses from Playhouse Yard. – 2. is in Rosemary Lane, about a furlong on the right hand from the Minories.

SEYMOUR MEWS, Portman Square, are two or three houses on the left hand side of Seymour Street, going from the south east corner of the square.

SEYMOUR PLACE. – 1. is in Curzon Street, May fair, nearly opposite South Audley Street – 2. is in Euston Square, on the north side of the New Road, nearly opposite the new Church of St. Pancras.

SEYMOUR STREET, LOWER, Portman Square, is at the south east corner of the square, and leads into Edward Street, Cavendish Square.

SEYMOUR STREET, UPPER, Portman Square, is at the south west corner of the square, opposite the preceding.

SHAD THAMES, Horselydown, is the last turning on the right hand side, going from Broad Street, and extends to Dockhead.

SHADWELL, one of the Tower Hamlets, and formerly a Hamlet of Stepney, is situated on the northern bank of the Thames, and received its name from a fine spring in the southern part of the churchyard. It is divided into Upper and Lower Shadwell, the latter being part of the ancient Wapping Marsh. – [see St. Paul, Shadwell]

SHADWELL DOCK Stairs, Lower Shadwell, are near the east end of Wapping Wall.

SHADWELL HIGH STREET, is the eastern continuation of Ratcliffe Highway.

SHADWELL MARKET, Upper Shadwell, is on the south side of Shadwell High Street.

SHADWELL, MIDDLE, is the first street parallel southward to part of Shadwell High Street.

SHADWELL, LITTLE, is the eastern continuation of Lower Shadwell to Bell Wharf.

SHADWELL, LOWER, is the continuation of Wapping Wall, by the side of the Thames.

SHADWELL, UPPER, is principally occupied by Shadwell High Street.

SHADWELL WORKHOUSE, is at about the middle of the west side of Union Street.

SHAFTS or SHAFTSBURY SQUARE or COURT, Westminster, is between Horse Shoe Alley and Smith’s Rents, in York Street.

SHAFTSBURY PLACE, Aldersgate Street, is about fifteen houses from Falcon Street. It derives its name from the contiguous mansion of the Earl of Shaftsbury, built by Inigo Jones, and now converted into several distinct tenements.

SHAKSPEARE’S WALK, Shadwell, is in Shadwell High Street.

SHARP’S ALLEY, West Smithfield, is a few houses on the right hand side of West Street, going from the north west corner of Smithfield Market.

SHARP’S BUILDINGS, Rosemary Lane, is part of the south side, near Little Tower Hill.

SHARP’S COURT. – 1. is in Leadenhall Street. – 2. is in Little Trinity Lane, Upper Thames Street.

SHAWS COURT. – 1. is in Charles Street, Drury Lane, the first turning on the left hand. – 2. is in New Court, Southwark, at the south end of it.

SHEARWOOD PLACE, Bethnal Green, is the second turning on the right hand side of Turvill Street, going from Church Street.

SHEEN’S COURT, Holborn Hill, is about twelve houses on the right hand side, above Farringdon Street.

SHEFFIELD�??? STREET, Clare Market, is the north west side of Clare Market.

SHEPHERD’S ALLEY, Upper Thames Street, is about the third of a mile on the left hand from London Bridge.

SHEPHERD’S COURT. – 1. is in King’s Head Court, Shoe Lane, three houses on the left hand from that lane. – 2. is in Upper Brook Street, Grosvenor Square, eight houses on the right hand from the north west corner of the said square. – 3. is in Old Nicol Street, Bethnal Green, the first turning on the left hand from Cock Lane.

SHEPHERD’S MARKET, Mayfair, is at the north end of White Horse Street, near Curzon Street.

SHEPHERD’S ROW, Bethnal Green Road, forms part of the south side, opposite Wilmot Street.

SHEPHERD’S SQUARE, Curzon Street, Mayfair, is about seven houses westward of Half Moon Street.

SHEPHERD STREET, Shepherd’s Market, extends from the south side of the market to Hertford Street.

SHEPHERD STREET, Oxford Street, is three houses eastward of New Bond Street.

SHEPHERD AND FLOCK COURT, White’s Alley, Coleman Street, is the fourth turning on the left hand from it.

SHERBOURNE LANE, Lombard Street, is behind St. Mary Woolnoth’s Church, and received its name from Langbourne Brook, which anciently ran out of Fenchurch, and here turning south, divided itself into several shares, rills or streams, and was called Southbourne Lane, and Sharebourne Lane, share being the old English for a divided stream.

SHERIFF OF LONDON’S OFFICE, is at No. 28, Coleman Street, and the hours of business are from 12 to 2, and 3 to 6.

The sheriffs are two very ancient officers of this city, established in the time of the Saxons: but Richard I. changed their name to the Norman appellation of bailiffs, which signifies an intendent, collector or petty magistrate; as the Saxon sciregrave implies a judge, overseer or collector. However the Norman appellation was of no long duration, and the ancient name of sheriff was restored to that officer.

The sheriffs are chosen by the liverymen of London, on Midsummer day, and enter into their offices on the Michaelmas day following.

SHERIFF OF MIDDLESEX’S OFFICE, is at No. 24, Red Lion Square. The hours of business are from 11 to 2, and 5 to 7, in Term; and from 11 to 3, in Vacation.

SHERIFF OF MIDDLESEX COMMISSIONERS’ OR SECONDARIES’ OFFICE, is at No. 15, Bedford Street.

SHERRARD COURT, Tooley Street, is between Glean Alley and Joiner Street.

SHERRARD (anciently Sherwood) STREET, Golden Square, is the first turning on the right hand in Titchbourne Street.

SHIP ALLEY, Wellclose Square, is at the south east corner of the square, and extends into Ratcliffe Highway.

SHIP COURT. – 1. is in York Street, Westminster, the first turning on the left hand side, going from James Street. – 2. is in the Old Bailey, four or five houses on the left hand from Ludgate Hill. 3. is in Green Bank, Tooley Street, the first turning on the right hand from it.

SHIP YARD. – 1. is in Picket Street, Strand, about six houses on the right hand side from Temple Bar. – 2. is in Wardour Street, Soho. – 3. is in Redcross Street, Cripplegate, nearly opposite Jewin Street. – 4. is in Bishopsgate Street�??? Without. – 5. is in the Minories. – 6. is in Green Bank, Tooley Street. – 7. is in High Street, Southwark.

SHIP TAVERN PASSAGE, Gracechurch Street, is eight houses on the right hand from Fenchurch Street.

SHIRE LANE, GREAT, Fleet Street, is on the east side of Temple Bar, and extends into Carey Street.

SHIRE LANE, LITTLE, Temple Bar, is about fifteen houses on the left hand in the last described.

SHIRE LANE, Chelsea, extends from behind the celebrated Bun House towards Sloane Street.

SHIRLEY’S COURT, Old Montague Street, Whitechapel, is the second turning on the right hand from Osborne Street.

SHOE LANE, Fleet Street, is about twenty four houses on the right hand side, above Farringdon Street; it extends from Fleet Street to Holborn Hill.

SHOEMAKER ROW, Blackfriars, is about ten houses on the right hand side of Creed Lane, going from Ludgate Street.

SHOREDITCH, is a district or parish that extends from Norton Falgate to Old Street, and from part of Finsbury to Bethnal Green. It was anciently a village situated by the side of the Roman military highway, called by the Saxons Eald (that is, Old) Street. The name of this village is of great antiquity, for John de Sordich or Sordige, its lord, was sent on an important embassy to Pope Clement III., by Edward III., in 1343. The popular legend of its deriving its name from Jane Shore dying in a ditch in its vicinity, is therefore a popular error, and the vulgar pronunciation of Sorditch the most correct. – [see St. Leonard, Shoreditch]

When archery was much in vogue, the captain of the London archers was always honoured with the title of the Duke of Shoreditch, from the circumstance that when Henry VIII. appointed a grand shooting match at Windsor, it was won by a citizen of London, named Barlow, an inhabitant of Shoreditch, who far out shot all the rest. The King was so well pleased that he called him the Duke of Shoreditch, which title he kept till his death, when it devolved on the aforesaid captain.

SHOREDITCH HIGH STREET, is the north continuation of Bishopsgate Street.

SHORTS BUILDINGS, Clerkenwell, is the second turning on thee left hand side of St. James’s Place, going from Aylesbury Street.

SHORT’S COURT, Spitalfields, is a few houses on the left hand side of Wentworth Street, going from Middlesex Street.

SHORT’S GARDENS, Drury Lane, are fifteen houses on the right hand, going from Broad Street, Bloomsbury.

SHORT STREET. – 1. is in Shoreditch, the first turning on the left hand side of Cumberland Street, going from the Curtain Road. – 2. is about the middle of the west side of the Pavement, Finsbury Square. – 3. is in St. George’s Fields, the first turning on the left hand side of Tower Street, from nearly opposite the Asylum.

SHORTER’S COURT, Throgmorton Street, is a few yards on the right hand side from the north east corner of the Bank of England. One of the entrances to the Stock Exchange is up this court

SHORTER’S RENTS, Rosemary Lane, are the third turning on the left hand side of White’s Yard, going from Rosemary Lane.

SHORTER STREET, Wellclose Square, is about the middle of the north side of that square.

SHOULDER OF MUTTON ALLEY, Limehouse, is a�??? few houses on the left hand side of Fore Street, going from the Drawbridge.

SHOVEL COURT, Wood Street, Cheapside, is about twelve houses on the left hand from Cheapside.

SHREWSBURY COURT, St. Luke’s, is about thirty houses on the left hand side of Whitecross Street, going from Chiswell Street.

SHROPSHIRE COURT, Tottenham Court Road, is at the east end of Pancras Street, adjoining Upper Thornhaugh Street.

SHUTER COURT, Basinghall Street, is about ten houses on the left hand from London Wall.

SICK AND HURT OFFICE, THE, is in Somerset Place. It is in connection with the Transport Board.

SIDMOUTH MEWS, Gray’s Inn Lane, are at the first turning northward of Sidmouth Street.

SIDMOUTH PLACE, Gray’s Inn Lane, is on the western side of that road, nearly opposite Acton Street.

SIDMOUTH STREET, Mecklenburgh Square, is at the south end of the preceding. It received its name in honour of Lord Viscount Sidmouth, when Prime Minister.

SIDNEY’S ALLEY, Leicester Square, is at the north west corner, leading to Coventry Street.

SIDNEY’S PLACE, Sidney Street, City Road, is a few houses from the City Road.

SIDNEY STREET, City Road, is the first turning on the right hand beyond the Angel, at Islington.

SIGNER OF WRIT’S OFFICE FOR THE COURT OF KING’S BENCH, is at the King’s Bench Office, Temple. Its present officers are, William Prevost and Thomas Chambre, Esqs., Signers of the Writs. The times of attendance are from 11 to 2, and from 5 to 7, in Term; and from 11 to 3, in Vacation.

SIGNET OFFICE, Somerset Place, is the third door on the left hand beyond the archway. This is an office under the principal secretaries of state, who have the custody of the King’s seal, called the signet, the use and application of which gives name to this office. The secretaries of state, are ex officio, Keepers of the Signet; Sir Brook Taylor, Bart., the Rev. W. E. Bentinck, John Gage and Augustus George Stapleton, Esqs., Clerks; Thomas Bidwell and Thomas Venables, Deputies; Charles P. Jones and E. D. Jones, Office Keepers and Receivers of Fees.

SILK STREET, Cripplegate, is about the middle of the west side of Milton Street.

SILVER COURT. – 1. is in Silver Street, Mile End New Town, about the middle of the west side. – 2. is in Silver Street, Golden Square, opposite Great Pulteney Street.

SILVER STREET. – 1. is in Golden Square, the continuation of Beak Street. – 2. is in Bloomsbury, about six houses on the left hand side of Southampton Street, going from Holborn. – 3. is in Fleet Street, and leads from Bouverie Street to Lombard Street. – 4. is in Wood Street, Cheapside, about a quarter of a mile on the left hand from Cheapside. – 5. is in Bridgewater Square, Barbican, the first turning on the right hand in Charles Street. – 6. is in Mile End New Town, the second turning on the right hand from Brick Lane. – 7. is in King Street, St. Georges in the East, the first turning on the led hand from Old Gravel Lane. – 8. is in Loman’s Pond, Southwark, the second turning on the left hand from Gravel Lane. – 9. is in Canterbury Square, Tooley Street, at the back of the west side of that square. – 10. is in Rotherhithe, the first turning on the right hand in Lower Queen Street – 11. is in Clerkenwell, at the north end of Turnmill Street�???.

SIMONS BUILDINGS, Westminster, are the first turning on the right hand side of Old Pye Street, in Duck Lane.

SIONS COURT, Bermondsey Street, is three houses on the right hand side, going from the church.

SION COLLEGE, Aldermanbury, adjoins the west end of the Church of St. Alphage, London Wall, and is on the site of the ancient Elsing Spital, which was dissolved in the reign of Henry VIII.

This collegiate establishment was founded by Dr. Thomas White, Vicar of St. Dunstan in the West, who left £3,000 to purchase the ground and build the college, with alms houses for ten poor men and ten poor women, and endowed it with £160 a year, for ever. It was incorporated by letters patent, under the great seal of England, bearing date the 3rd of July, in the sixth year of Charles I., A.D. 1631, under the title of “The President and Fellows of the College of Sion, within the City of London;” by which the Bishop of London was appointed Visitor, and the Clergy of London, Fellows. They are a body corporate, and have a common seal, upon which is the figure of the good Samaritan, with the motto, Vade et fac similiter and round it Sigillum Collegii de Sion Londini

The original building was began in 1627, and shortly afterwards a spacious library was added at the sole expense of the Rev. John Simpson, Rector of St. Olave, Hart Street, one of the executors of Dr. Whitens will. A great number of books were brought to it from the old Cathedral of St. Paul, and many others were given by private benefactors. In 1666, a third part of the books, the whole of the alms houses, several chambers of the students, and the apartments reserved for the meetings of the fellows, and the residence of the librarian and clerk were destroyed by the great fire. It was afterwards rebuilt, as at present, and the new library greatly added to, in particularly by a part of the Jesuits’ books seized in 1679, and by various donations.

This establishment consists of the Lord Bishop of London, Visitor; the Rev. Thomas Leigh, M.A., Rector of St. Magnus, President; the Rev. Samuel Wix, M.A., Vicar of Allhallows the Less, and the Rev. Thomas Horne M.A., Rector of St. Catherine Coleman, Deans; the Rev. Trefusis Lovell, M.A., Rector of St. Luke’s, the Ven. Archdeacon Hollingsworth, D.D., Rector of St. Christopher-le-Stocks, the Rev. W. E. L. Faulkner, M.A., Rector of St. John, Clerkenwell, and the Rev. Alltson Burgh, M. A., Rector of St. Mary Magdalen, Assistants; and all the incumbents of parishes within the City of London and its Liberties, Fellows.

SION COLLEGE GARDENS, Aldermanbury, are four houses on the right hand side of that street, going from London Wall.

SION COURT, Aldermanbury, is ten houses on the left hand side of Philip Lane, going from London Wall.

SION SQUARE, Mile End Old Town, is about ten houses on the left hand side of Union Street, from the Whitechapel Road.

SIX CLERKS’ OFFICE, Chancery Lane, is about six houses on the right hand side going from Holborn. The hours of business are from 10 to 2, and 6 to 8, in Term; and 10 to 2, in Vacation. This is an office appertaining to the Court of Chancery, and the six clerks are next in degree to the twelve masters in that court. Their business is to enroll commissions, pardons, patents, warrants, &c. that have passed the great seal, and other business in Chancery. There are also, under these, thirty other sworn clerks, called clerks in court, who act for and with the solicitors in this court. The present six clerks are, John Kipling, Francis Vesey, Edward V. Utterson, William Tur�???ton, Launcelot Baugh Allen and Richard Pollen, Esqs.; and William Roberts, Deputy Record Keeper.

SIZE LANE, Bucklersbury, is eight houses on the left hand side of Pancras Lane, going from Queen Street. Its name is a corruption of St. Osyth’s Lane.

SIZE YARD, Whitechapel Road, is nearly opposite the church.

SKINNER’S ALMS HOUSES, Mile End Road, are a few houses on the north side of the road below the turnpike, and adjoining those of the Trinity House. They were funded by Lewis Newbury, in 1698, for twelve poor widows, who received an allowance of £16 16s. a year each, and the chaplain £40 a year. They have also other alms houses in Great St. Helen’s, Bishopsgate Street, founded by Lady Holles, in 1599. – [see Holles Alms Houses]

SKINNER’S HALL, Dowgate Hill, is about four houses on the right hand side below Cloak Lane. It is a spacious handsome building, with a new elevation next the street, of the Ionic order, designed by Robert Adam, Esq., one of the architects of the Adelphi.

The Skinner’s Company was incorporated by letters patent of the first year of Edward III., in the year 1327, by the appellation of “The Master and Wardens of the Guild or Fraternity of the Body of Christ of the Skinners of London,” which was confirmed by Henry VI. in 1438. The members of this company do not, as others, pay any quarterage, which is owing to the great estates of which they are possessed; out of which, according to the wills of the respective donors, they pay above £1000 a year to charitable uses. Among these benefactors are, Thomas Hunt, Esq., Sir Thomas Smith, Sir Andrew Judd, Mrs. Alice Smith, Lewis Newberry, Henry Fisher, Henry Spurling, Mrs. Margaret Awdeley, Peter Blundel, Sir James Lancaster, John Meredith, John Draper, Nicholas Jennings, Henry Barton, Lawrence Atwell, Sir Wolstan Dixie, William Stoddard, Thomas Audley, Robert Bateman, Matthew Bateson, Barbara Champion, Sir William Cockayne, Sir Abraham Dawes, and George Forman, the particulars and details of which are to be found in the Parliamentary Reports of the Endowed Charities of England and Wales.

SKINNER’S PLACE, Weston Street, Somers Town, is the first turning on the left hand from behind Weston Place, and is named from being on the estate of the Skinner’s Company.

SKINNER’S PLACE, Size Lane, is a mansion on the eastern side of the lane, which, belonging to the Skinner’s Company, has been recently converted by the company into sets of commercial chambers.

SKINNER’S PLACE, Leadenhall Market, is on the east side facing the passage from Gracechurch Street, and is named from the Skin Market, in its vicinity.

SKINNER’S ROW, Somers Town, is the first turning on the right hand side of Skinner’s Street, going from the New Road.

SKINNER STREET. – 1. is in Somers Town, the first turning on the right hand side of the New Road. – 2. on Snow’s Hill, the continuation of Holborn from Farringdon Street, and received its name from the late Alderman Skinner, through whose exertions it was principally built. – 3. is in Bishopsgate Street Without, about twenty four houses north from Sun Street.

SLADE’S BUILDINGS, Bishopsgate Without, is on the north side of Smith’s Buildings.

SLADE’S COURT, Southwark, is the second turning on the left hand side of Redcross Street from Union Street.

SLATER COURT, Rosemary Lane, is the fourth turning in Blue Anchor Yard.

SLEEP’S ALLEY, Clerkenwell, is about half a mile on the left hand side of St. John Street, going from Smithfield.

SLOANE SQUARE, Chelsea, in the space between Sloane Street and Lower Sloane Street, and receives its name from Sir Hans Sloane.

SLOANE STREET, Chelsea, or Knightsbridge, is the first turning on the left hand side going from Hyde Park Corner.

SLOANE STREET, LOWER, Chelsea, is opposite the preceding.

SLOANE STREET, LITTLE, Chelsea, is the continuation of the preceding.

SMALL POX HOSPITAL for Casual and for Vaccination. – [see Battle Bridge]

SMART’S BUILDINGS, High Holborn, is about seventeen houses on the right hand side going from Drury Lane.

SMART’S COURT, Rosemary Lane, is two houses on the left hand side of Cartwright Street, going from Rosemary Lane.

SMART’S GARDENS, Bethnal Green, is an island of small houses at the south end of Wilmot Street.

SMITH’S ALMS HOUSES, St. Peter’s Hill, Doctors’ Commons, were founded in 1584 by Mr. David Smith, embroiderer to Queen Elizabeth, for six poor widows turned of fifty-six years of age. The old structure having been destroyed by the fire of London, it was rebuilt by Sir Thomas Fitch, and the charge of maintaining it committed to the Governors of Christ’s Hospital.

SMITH’S BUILDINGS. – 1. is on the east side of Gray’s Inn Lane, near King’s Cross, Battle Bridge. – 2. is in Chequer Alley, Bunhill Row, about the middle of the north side. – 3. is in Lamb Alley, Bishopsgate Without, on the north side of Lamb Court. – 4. is in Leadenhall Street, near Aldgate pump. – 5. is in Long Lane, Bermondsey, on the east side of Miles’s Rents.

SMITH’S COURT. – 1. is in Great Windmill Street, Haymarket, five houses south of Brewer Street. – 2. is on Holborn Hill, opposite St. Andrew’s Church. – 3. is in Brackley Street, Cripplegate, the second turning on the right hand from Golden Lane. – 4. is in Whitechapel Road, about a sixth of a mile on the left hand from the church. – 5. is in Lower Chapman Street, St. George’s in the East, the fifth turning oh the left hand from Cannon Street Road.

SMITH’S PLACE. – 1. is in Skinner Street, Somers Town, the first turning on the right hand from Judd Place. – 2. is in Gray’s Inn Lane, behind Smith’s Buildings. – 3. is in Wapping Street, between Globe Street and the entrance to the London Docks. – 4. is in Salmon Lane, Limehouse, about a furlong on the left hand from the Commercial Road. – 5. is in Gibraltar Row, St. George’s in the Fields, near the Elephant and Castle.

SMITH’S RENTS. – 1. is in York Street, Westminster, nearly opposite Ship Court. – 2. is in St. John Street, Clerkenwell. – 3. is in Angel Square, Bishopsgate Without. – 4. is in Bankside, Southwark, about four houses west from Horse Shoe Alley. – 5. is in Union Street, St. George’s Fields, the last turning on the right hand from the London Road. – 6. is in Bermondsey Street, nearly opposite the church.

SMITH SQUARE, Westminster, the houses which surround St. John’s Church.

SMITH STREET. – 1. GREAT, is in King’s Road, Chelsea, being the continuation of Durham Place from the west side of the Hospital. – 2. LITTLE, is in Chelsea, the first turning on the left hand in the last from the King’s Road. – 3. GREAT, is in Westminster, the south continuat�???ion of Dean Street. – 4. LITTLE, is in Westminster, the first turning on the left hand from Dean Street. – 5. is in Northampton Square, Clerkenwell, at the south east corner of the square. – 6. UPPER, is in Northampton Square, Clerkenwell, opposite the preceding, and intersecting Spencer Street.

SMITHFIELD BARS, West Smithfield, are at the entrance of St. John Street, and mark the boundary of the City liberties in this part of the metropolis.

SMITHFIELD MARKET or WEST SMITHFIELD, is at the north end of Giltspur Street, going from Newgate Street. It is the greatest market for black cattle, sheep and horses, in Europe; for the latter of which it is celebrated by Fitz Stephen, towards the close of the twelfth century. Its name is supposed to be derived from one Smith, its owner, and from being a large and level field. Henry II. granted to the priory of St. Bartholomew the privilege of keeping an annual fair at Bartholomew tide, which has degenerated into the present Bartlemy Fair. – [see St. Bartholomew’s Church, Hospital, &c.]

The management of this market is under the control of the Committee of City Lands and two Collectors, one of whom, Mr. J. Tisdall, was appointed March 21, 1777, and the other, Mr. Thomas Shank, December 16, 1819.

SMITHFIELD, UPPER EAST, Little Tower Hill, extends from the eastern side of Tower Hill, on the northern side of St. Katherine’s Docks, to Ratcliffe Highway.

SMITHFIELD, LOWER EAST, is the continuation of Butcher Row to the Hermitage Bridge.

SNEAD’S COURT, Piccadilly, is at the north end of Engine Street, and leads into Park Lane.

SNOW’S FIELDS, Bermondsey, is the continuation of King Street, and extends into Bermondsey Street.

SNOW HILL, Holborn Bridge, is on the northern side of Skinner Street, and extends from Farringdon Street to the upper end of Skinner Street, near the Church of St. Sepulchre.

SNOW’S RENTS, Westminster, are in York Street, nearly opposite Queen Square.

SNUG’S BUILDINGS, Clerkenwell, are the first turning on the left hand side of Little Warner Street, going from Ray Street.

SOCIETIES, THE, various, are to be found under their respective initials, as Antiquaries, Arts, Bible, British Artists, &c.

SOCRATES PLACE, Shoreditch, is about eight houses on the right hand side of New Inn Street.

SOHO SQUARE, is situated at the southern end of Charles Street, Oxford Street, and was built in the reign of Charles II. This square was originally called Monmouth Square, in honour of the Duke of Monmouth, whose mansion, designed by Sir Christopher Wren, stood on its south side; but on the execution of that unfortunate prince, by his uncle, James II., it was called King Square. This name was shortly after changed, by the admirers of the duke, to its present, the interjection Soho, having been the watchword of the day at the battle of Sedgemoor.

The duke’s house afterwards came into the possession of Lord Bateman, who pulled it down, and let its site and gardens for dwelling houses, which are now known by the name of Bateman’s Buildings. – [see Bateman’s Buildings]

SOL’S ROW, Hampstead Road, is on the west side of the road, nearly opposite the New River Company’s reservoir, and extends from Charles Street to Frederick’s Place.

SOMERSET BUILDINGS, Ha�???ckney Road, are at the first turning on the left hand side of Crabtree Row, going from the High Road.

SOMERSET COURT, Aldgate, is a few yards on the right hand side of Little Somerset Street.

SOMERSET HOUSE or PLACE, Strand, is about a quarter of a mile on the south side near the new church. Somerset House was originally built about the year 1549, by the Duke of Somerset, uncle to Edward VI., and Protector of England, who demolished the palaces of the Bishops of Chester and Worcester, an Inn of Chancery, called the Strand Inn, and the Church of St. Mary-le-Strand, which all stood on its site. He built his new palace with the materials obtained from the church and tower of St. John of Jerusalem, the cloisters on the north side of St. Paul’s Church, and the chapel and charnel house, all of which he caused to be destroyed for that purpose, and gave the new building the name of Somerset House. The architect of that part is supposed to have been John of Padua, who had been employed by Henry VIII. On the attainder of the duke, it fell to the crown, and was the occasional abode of Queen Elizabeth, and other royal personages.

In this palace Anne of Denmark, Queen of James I. kept her court, and it was, consequently, called Denmark House, but after her death it recovered its original name. During this reign Inigo Jones added that elegant front next the Thames, that has been so often the theme of admiration, by the lovers of harmonious proportions and classical architecture. It was afterwards the residence of Queen Catherine, the Queen Dowager of Charles II., and by an act of the 2nd year of George III., it was settled on his Queen Charlotte for life, but it was afterwards exchanged for Buckingham House.

This ancient palace was taken down in 1775, under the authority of an act of parliament, and the present handsome and extensive building, erected from the designs of Sir William Chambers. It occupies a length from east to west on the bank of the Thames of 800 feet in length, and 500 in depth from the Strand to the Terrace. This area is divided into a large quadrangular court 340 feet long and 210 feet broad, with a street on the west side, and a second court on the east, now building for King’s College, which is to occupy the eastern wing, and completes the elevation next the river. These communicate to a spacious terrace fifty feet in width, raised fifty feet above the bed of the river, and occupying the whole length of the building.

The elevation next the Strand is at once grand and simple. The ground story consists of nine arcades, the three middle ones of which are open, and lead to the courtyard, the three to the westward are occupied by the Royal Academy, and the three to the eastward by the Royal and Antiquarian Societies. The key stone of these arches are finely sculptured, by Wilton, into colossal masks, representing Ocean, and the eight chief rivers of Great Britain, namely, Thames, Humber, Mersey and Dee, westward of the centre, and Medway, Tweed, Tyne and Severn eastward. The upper stories are decorated with three quarter columns of the Corinthian order, above which is an attic occupied by the great exhibition and lecture room of the Royal Academy, the entablature of which is supported by caryatides. The elevations of the quadrangle and the river are in a corresponding style of architecture with the rest, and it is, as a whole, one of the completest works of one architect in Europe. The style is Italian, in the purest mode, and refined to a degree scarcely excelled by Palladio himself.

The public offices contained in this splendid building are, in front, the Royal Academy, the Society of Antiquaries, and the Royal Society; on the south side of the quadrangle are, the Stamp Office, the Navy Office, and Navy Pay Office, which open al�???so towards the terrace; on the east and west sides are the offices of the Auditor of the Exchequer, the Chancellors of the Duchies of Cornwall and Lancaster; the Hawkers’ and Pedlers’ Office; the Stage Coach Office; the Legacy Duty Office; the Privy Seal and Signet Office; and the revenue department of the Tax Offices.

When the eastern wing is completed, we may add the King’s College to the preceding, which is now erecting from the designs and under the superintendance of Mr. Smirke.

SOMERSET PLACE. – 1. is in Castle Street, Finsbury, the second turning on the right hand from the City Road. – 2. is on Kennington Common, a few yards on the right hand beyond the Horn’s Tavern.

SOMERSET STREET. – 1. is in Duke Street, Manchester Square, five houses on the left hand side going from Oxford Street. – 2. is in Aldgate, the first turning eastward of the Minories. – 3. LITTLE, is on the western side of the preceding. – 4. is at the bottom of Beaufort Buildings in the Strand.

SOMER’S PLACE. – 1. EAST, Somers Town, is on the right hand side of the New Road, about a quarter of a mile from Kings Cross, Battle Bridge. – 2. WEST, is the continuation of the preceding.

SOMER’S QUAY, Lower Thames Street, is one of the public legal quays, the first westward of Billingsgate. – [see Legal Quays]

SOMER’S STAIRS, Lower Thames Street, adjoining the preceding.

SONS OF THE CLERGY, THE, Corporation of. No. 2, Bloomsbury Square, is a charitable institution for relief of poor widows, and children of clergymen, and for clothing, maintaining and educating poor orphans of clergymen of the established church in England, until of age to be put apprentice. It was established in the reign of Charles II. by a charter bearing date July 1, 1678, under the tide of “The Corporation for the Relief Of Poor Widows and Children of Clergymen.” This charter has been enlarged, and more powers given by George I., in 1714, and it is now in a flourishing situation.

To this is added a school for the orphans at St. John’s Wood, which is supported in the same manner, and has an anniversary charitable meeting at St. Paul’s.

The officers of the corporation are, the Archbishop of Canterbury, President; Lord Tenterden, Vice President; Benjamin Harrison, William Manning, Esqrs., M.P., and Charles Bosanquet, Esq., Treasurers; forty two Assistants; the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Lord Chancellor, the Archbishop of York, the Lord High Treasurer, the Bishop of London, the Lord High Almoner and the Lord Mayor of London for the time being. Visitors; and John M. Grimwood, Esq., Registrar, of whom, at the office aforesaid, all information may be obtained.

The officers of the anniversary are, the Archbishop of Canterbury, President; Lord Tenterden, Vice President; J. H. Markland, Esq., Paper buildings, Temple, Treasurer and Secretary; E. R. Fayerman, Collector.

SOUTH BANK, Regent’s Park, is a row of genteel cottages on the south bank of the Regent’s Canal.

SOUTH CRESCENT. – [see Crescents]

SOUTH LONDON DISPENSARY, No. 90, Great Surrey Street, Blackfriars’ Road, was instituted on the 1st of May, 1821, for a district embracing Lambeth, Vauxhall, Newington and Walworth. This charitable institution is governed by H.R.H. the Duke of Sussex, Patron; Robert Slade, Esq., Treasurer; a committee of fifteen Managers; S. Everest, Esq., Secretary.

SOUTH LONDON WAT�???ER-WORKS, is a commercial company incorporated in 1805, under the management of W. M. Christy, Esq., and twelve other Directors; J. W. Peppercorne, Esq., Chief Clerk.

SOUTH MEWS, Manchester Square, is about three houses on the left hand side of South Street, going from Manchester Street.

SOUTH MOLTON LANE, Oxford Street, is in the rear of South Molton Street.

SOUTH MOLTON STREET, Oxford Street, is the first turning westward of New Bond Street, and leads into Brook Street, Grosvenor Square.

SOUTH PLACE, Finsbury, is part of the north side, and adjoins South Street.

SOUTH ROW, Somers Town, is in the New Road, opposite Somers Place West, and near the turning that leads to Tavistock Square.

SOUTH SEA COURT. – 1. is in Lombard Street, Mint, Southwark. – 2. is in the Maze, Southwark.

SOUTH SEA HOUSE, Threadneedle Street, is a large substantial brick building, opposite the Church of St. Martin Outwich; in the inside of which is a handsome courtyard and Doric colonnade.

The South Sea Company was incorporated in 1710, by Queen Anne, to pay off a sum of nearly ten millions then due to the seamen employed in the wars against France. In 1720, they obtained an act of parliament, giving them the sole privilege of trading to the South Seas; and by various deceptions, raised the value of their stock to £1000. per cent. By these malpractices, known in history as the South Sea Bubble, a few persons were elevated from poverty to immense wealth, and thousands reduced from affluence to beggary.

The Company has long since ceased to be a trading body, and the remainder of its stock, which is about twenty millions due from government, converted into annuity stock. Their affairs are regulated by the provisions of an act of parliament passed in 1763, under the management of the King, Governor; Charles Bosanquet, Esq., Sub-Governor; Sir Robert Baker, Deputy Governor; twenty-one Directors; Thomas Snape, Esq., Cashier; Andrew White, Esq., Deputy Cashier; Nathaniel Simpson, Esq., Secretary; W.R. Arnold, Esq., Accomptant; Roston Gamage, Esq., Accomptant of Transfer Office; Counsel; and Ralph Dunn, Esq., Solictor.

SOUTH STREET. – 1. is in the King’s Road, Chelsea, the first turning on the right hand beyond Sloane Square. – 2. is in Manchester Square, the second turning on the right hand in Manchester Street. – 3. is in South Audley Street, the fourth turning from Grosvenor Square. – 4. is in Finsbury, between Finsbury Place and Wilson Street. – 5. is in Spitalfields Market, the fifth turning on the left hand from Bishopsgate Street. – 6. is on the north side of Lambeth Terrace, Westminster Bridge Road. – 7. is at the eastern end of the London Hospital, Whitechapel Road. – 8. is in the middle of the south side of West Square, St. George’s Fields.

SOUTHAMPTON’S, THE EARL OF, ALMS HOUSES, Monmouth Street, St. Giles’s, were built and endowed in 1656, by the Earl of Southampton, and enlarged by Henry Carter, Esq., in 1674, for twenty poor parishioners of St. Giles’s in the Fields.

SOUTHAMPTON BUILDINGS, High Holborn, is on the western side of Middle Row, and leads from nearly opposite Gray’s Inn Gate into Chancery Lane. It derives its name from the ancient city mansion of the Bishop of Lincoln, but which coming afterwards into the possession of the Earls of Southampton, it was pulled down and its site and gardens converted into the present buildings.

SOUTHAMPTON COURT. – 1. Southampton Build�???ings, Holborn. – 2. is in Southampton Row, Bloomsbury. – 3. is nearly opposite Warren Street, Tottenham Court Road.

SOUTHAMPTON MEWS. – 1. is in the New Road, on the north side of Southampton Place. – 2. is near the middle of the west side of Southampton Row, Bloomsbury.

SOUTHAMPTON PLACE, Euston Square, is on the north side of the New Road, nearly opposite St. Pancras New Church.

SOUTHAMPTON ROW. – 1. is in the Edgeware Road, nearly opposite Winchester Row. – 2. is the continuation of King Street, Holborn, behind the east side of Bloomsbury Square

SOUTHAMPTON STREET. – 1. is on the north side of the Strand, and leads into Covent Garden Market. – 2. is on the north side of High Holborn, and leads into Bloomsbury Square. – 3. is in Pentonville, the second turning on the right hand side of the High Road below the chapel, going towards King’s Cross, Battle Bridge.

SOUTHWARK, the Borough of, is a considerable portion of our great metropolis which lies on the southern side of the Thames, and consists of the five parishes of St. George, St. John, St. Olave, St. Saviour and’ St. Thomas. The principal streets are, the High Street, St. Margaret’s Hill, Blackman Street, part of Long Lane, King Street, Union Street and Tooley or St. Olave’s Street. – [see those several places]

Southwark was governed by its own bailiff till 1327, when the mayor of London was constituted bailiff of Southwark, and empowered to govern it by deputy. That portion of the borough of Southwark, which is subject to the city of London, is called the Borough Liberty; the other division is called the Clink, (which see) and belongs to the Bishop of Winchester, who appoints a steward and bailiff, under whom that district is governed.

The present officers of Southwark are, John Holmes, Esq., High Bailiff’; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Steward; Alderman Joshua Jonathan Smith, Justice; John Newman, Esq., Clerk to the Sitting Magistrates; William Payne, Esq., Coroner; Mr. John Law, Keeper of the Compter; Richard Reeve, Marshalman.

SOUTHWARK BRIDGE, THE, is a beautiful structure that crosses the Thames, from the bottom of Queen Street, Cheapside, to Bankside, Southwark. It was designed by the late John Rennie, Esq., and executed under his direction. The iron work was cast at the founderies of Messrs. Walker and Yates, at Rotherham, in Yorkshire.

This Bridge consists of three magnificent arches composed of segments of circles. The chord or span of the centre arch is 240 feet, and its versed sine or height 24 feet. The diameter of the circle of the curvature at the vertex or crown of the arch is 624 feet, and the height of the frame of the arch at its vertex is 6 feet. This is the largest arch yet executed, being of the same span as the great bridge over the Wear, at Sunderland, which, however, rises 30 feet.

This fine Bridge, which is as elegant in its form, as it is scientific in construction, was erected at the expense of a joint stock company, and cost about £800,000. The first stone of the bridge was laid by Admiral Lord Keith, on the 23rd of May, 1815; and the first stone of the northern abutment, upon the site of the ancient Three Cranes wharf, was laid by the Lord Mayor (Alderman Wood), and the bridge was opened to the public in April, 1819. A fine engraving, and more ample particulars of this bridge, are given in my work of London in the Nineteenth Century.

SPA FIELDS, is a district now covered with houses, streets and squares, (for which see their several names) It was not long sin�???ce a large open field, and received its name from a celebrated mineral spring.

SPANISH PLACE, Manchester Square, is at the north east corner of the square, and extends into Charles Street. At the north east corner of this place, is the Roman Catholic chapel belonging to the Spanish ambassador, a handsome classical building from the designs of the late Mr. Bonomi, A.R.A.

SPARK’S PLACE, Aldgate, is at the south east corner of Great Duke’s Place.

SPARROW CORNER, Minories, is at the corner of that street and Rosemary Lane.

SPELDHURST STREET, Burton Crescent, is the second turning on the left hand side of Judd Street, going from Judd’s Place.

SPENCER PLACE, Kennington Common, is on the right hand side of the beginning of the Croydon Road.

SPENCER ROW, Northampton Square, is part of the western side of the Goswell Street Road, from Upper Ashby Street to Spencer Street.

SPENCER STREET. – 1. is in Northampton, Square, and extends from the turnpike, Goswell Street Road, to St. John’s Street Road. – 2. is the first turning on the right hand side of New Inn Yard, Shoreditch. – 3. is in St. George’s in the East, the third turning on the right hand side of Charles Street, opposite Blue Gate Fields.

SPICER COURT, Bethnal Green, is the first turning on the right hand side of Spicer Street, going from Brick Lane.

SPICER STREET, Bethnal Green, is on the right hand side of Brick Lane, going towards Church Street.

SPIKEMAN’S COURT, Mary-le-bone, is about three houses in Little Portland Street, three doors eastward of Great Portland Street.

SPILLER’S COURT, Blackfriars’ Road, is the third turning on the left hand side of Webber Row, going from the road.

SPITAL COURT, Mile End New Town, is the first turning on the right hand side of Spital Street, northward of Pelham Street.

SPITAL FIELDS, is a district of considerable extent, which derives its name from having been built upon the fields belonging to St. Mary’s Spital, which stood on the east side of Bishopsgate Street. It was originally a hamlet belonging to the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney, but in 1723, it was made a distinct parish. – [see Christchurch, Spitalfields]

SPITAL FIELDS BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, for Visiting and Relieving the Sick and Distressed Poor at their own Habitations, was established in 1811, for the numerous poor of this great manufacturing district. My readers are referred to Mr. Highmore’s Philanthropia Metropolitana, for details of the great distress of this district, and for the great utility of this institution.

It is under the management of gentlemen belonging to the neighbourhood; of whom Thomas F. Buxton, Esq., M.P., is Patron; William Hale, Esq., Samuel Hoare, Esq. and William Lewis, Esq., Vice Patrons; the Rev. Josiah Pratt, D.D., Minister of Wheeler Street chapel, President; John Kincaid, Esq., of Spital Square, Treasurer; with a Committee of thirty members chosen annually, and a female committee of eighteen ladies.

SPITAL SQUARE, Bishopsgate Without, is near the third of a mile on the right hand side of the street, northward of the church; it leads into White Lion Street.

SPITALFIELDS MARKET, Spitalfields, is on the west side of the church, between Lamb Street and Paternoster Row.

SPITALFIELDS’ WORKHOUSE, is on the east side of Charles Street, Mile End New Town.

SPOTTED HORSE COURT, Shoreditch, is five houses southward of Holywell Lane.

SPREAD EAGLE COURT, Finch Lane, is three houses on the left hand aide, going from Cornhill.

SPRING GARDENS, Charing Cross, is between the Broad Way, so called, and St. James’s Park.

SPRING GARDEN, NEW, Pimlico, is on the east side of Avery Farm Row.

SPRING GARDEN MEWS, Charing Cross, is on the south side of New Street, Spring Garden.

SPRING STREET. – 1. is in Portland Square, five houses on the right hand side, westward of Baker Street. – 2. UPPER, is the north continuation of the preceding into York Street. – 3. GREAT, is in Shadwell, and extends from the south side of the churchyard to Lower Turning. – 4. LITTLE, is in Foxes Lane, Shadwell, four houses on the right hand side from the east end of the churchyard.

STABLE YARD, St. James’s, is the last turning on the left hand in Cleveland Row, and was anciently the stable yard of the palace.

STAFFORD PLACE, Pimlico, is about ten houses on the left, going from Buckingham gate towards Chelsea.

STAFFORD ROW, Pimlico, commences on the left hand side of the High Road, by Buckingham Gate, and extends to Ward’s Row.

STAFFORD STREET, Lisson Grove, is nearly opposite the Yorkshire Stingo.

STAFFORD STREET, Old Bond Street, is the first turning on the left hand from Piccadilly.

STAGE COACH DUTY OFFICE, Somerset Place, is one of the branches of the Stamp Office, and is under the management of Louis J. Pouchée, Esq., Assessor; four Clerks, and a Comptroller.

STAINING LANE, Wood Street, Cheapside, is opposite the north end of Gutter Lane.

STAMFORD STREET, Blackfriars’ Road, is the second turning on the right hand side, going towards the Obelisk.

STAMFORD STREET, UPPER, is the continuation of the preceding into the Waterloo Bridge Road.

STAMP OFFICE, Somerset Place, is at the south east corner of the Quadrangle, and is under the management of John Thornton, Esq., Chairman; William A. Montague, Esq., Deputy Chairman; H. I. Montagu, J. W. Bowden, Edward Saurin and Richard Wellesley, Esqs., Commissioners; Charles Pressley, Esq., Secretary; a receiver general, a chief clerk, a comptroller, a variety of inspectors, clerks, examiners, warehouse keepers, &c.

STANDIGE’S BUILDINGS, Tooley Street, is the second turning on the left hand side of Stony Lane, going from Tooley Street.

STANGATE COURT, Piccadilly, is on the west side of Burlington House.

STANGATE, Lambeth, is the first turning on the right hand side of the Westminster Bridge Road, going from the bridge.

STANGATE STREET, Lambeth, is the continuation of the preceding.

STANGATE PLACE, Lambeth, is under the archway in Stangate Street, near Felix Street.

STANHOPE STREET. – 1. is in Mayfair, the first turning on the left hand in South Audley Street. – 2. LITTLE, is in Mayfair, the first turning on the right hand in Hertford �???Street. – 3. is in Clare Market, the continuation of Newcastle Street.

STAPLE COURT, Bermondsey Street, is about five houses on the left hand side of the street, going from the church towards Tooley Street.

STAPLE’S INN, Holborn, is three houses on the south side, going from Middle Row towards Farringdon Street. It is an Inn of Chancery, and an appendage as an Inn of Court to Gray’s Inn. This Inn is said to have been anciently a hall for the accommodation of wool staplers, whence it derived its name; but it was an Inn of Chancery before 1415, and in 1529 the benchers of Gray’s Inn purchased it for its present purpose.

STAPLE’S INN BUILDINGS, Middle Row, Holborn, is a turning that leads into Staples Inn.

STAPLE’S RENTS, Rotherhithe, is a few houses on the right hand side of Paradise Street, going from Mill Pond Bridge.

STAPLETON’S COURT, Finsbury, is on the north side of Ropemaker Street, between Finsbury Street and Type Street.

STAR ALLEY. – 1. is in Upper East Smithfield, a few houses on the left hand side, eastward of Butcher Row. – 2. is in Fenchurch Street, about fifty-two houses on the right hand side going from Gracechurch Street.

STAR CORNER, Bermondsey Street, is the continuation of that street, going from Long Lane to the Grange Road.

STAR COURT. – 1. is in the Strand, a few houses on the right hand side going from Temple Bar. – 2. is in Chancery Lane, about eighteen houses on the left hand side from Fleet Street. – 3. is in Cross Lane, Parker’s Lane, Lincoln’s Inn Fields. – 4. is in Little Compton Street, Soho, on the north side, between Greek Street and Crown Street. – 5. is in Milton Street, Cripplegate, about the middle of the west side, opposite Angel Court. – 6. is in Bread Street, Cheapside, about nine houses on the left hand side, going from Cheapside. – 7. is in Bread Street Hill, five doors on the left hand side from Bread Street. – 8. is in Mint Street, Southwark, about a furlong on the left hand from opposite St. George’s Church. – 9. is in Bermondsey Street, about thirty five houses on the right hand side from Tooley Street. – 10. is in Great Eastcheap, six houses on the left hand from Fish Street Hill.

STAR NEWSPAPER OFFICE, THE, is in Pickett Street, Strand.

STAR PLACE, St. George’s in the East, is the last turning on the left hand side of Lower Chapman Street, going from Cannon Street Road.

STAR STREET, Shadwell, is the continuation of Shakspeare’s Walk.

STAR YARD. – 1. is in Carey Street, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, the first turning on the right hand from Chancery Lane. – 2. is in Old Gravel Lane, three houses on the left hand from Ratcliffe Highway.

STARCH ALLEY, Goswell Street, is on the south side of Old Street.

STATE PAPER OFFICE, THE, is at No. 34, Great George Street, Westminster, and the hours of attendance are from 10 to 4. It is under the management of the Right Hon. Henry Hobhouse, F.S.A., Keeper of the State Papers; Robert Lemon, Esq., Deputy Keeper; Joseph Rooke, First Clerk; and Charles Lechmere, Second Clerk.

STATIONERS COURT, Ludgate Street, is the second turning on the right hand side, going from St. Paul’s Church Yard. It leads to Stationers’ Hall, (whence it derives its name) to Amen Corner, Paternoster Row and Ave Maria Lane.

STATIONERS’ �???FUND, THE, is a series of benefactions left by various benevolent individuals for the relief of poor members of the Stationers Company, and are detailed under various heads. – [see Bowyer’s Charity, Stationers’ Hall, Strahan’s Charity]

STATIONERS’ HALL, Ludgate Street, is on the north side of this street, in a small quadrangle, called Stationers’ Court. It stands on the site of an ancient mansion of the Dukes of Bretagne, after which it belonged to the Earls of Pembroke, and in Queen Elizabeth’s reign, to Henry, Earl of Abergavenny, and finally to the Stationers Company, who rebuilt it and made it their hall. It was burned down in 1666, and was subsequently rebuilt. It underwent a substantial repair, and the eastern front was cased with Portland stone, about the year 1805, under the directions of Robert Milne, Esq.

The Stationers’ Company was incorporated by Philip and Mary, in 1557, by the name of “The Master and Keepers, or Wardens and Commonalty of the mystery or art of a Stationer of the City of London,” and is the forty-seventh in rotation on the City list. This Company has a portion of the Irish estates in Ulster, and are trustees to many excellent charities, which are liberally and faithfully distributed.

STAVE YARD, Wapping Street, it about a furlong on the right hand side, below Hermitage Bridge.

STEEL YARD, Upper Thames Street, is opposite Bush Lane, and was originally the hall of the Anseatic merchants, and the warehouses where they used to stow their steel, flax, hemp, pitch, tar, masts, cables, linen cloth, wheat, rye and other grains. In this place are still large warehouses for iron, &c.

STEEL’S YARD. – 1. is in Great Tower Hill, on the east side, about eight houses from Cooper’s Row. – 2. is in New Street, Maze Pond, Southwark, on the left side of Guy’s Hospital.

STEER’S PLACE, Barbican, is about ten houses on the right hand side, going from Aldersgate Street.

St. STEPHEN’S CHAPEL, Westminster. – [see House of Commons]

St. STEPHEN, Coleman Street, the Church of, is situated near the south end of the west side of this street, and derives its name and addition from its dedication to St. Stephen, the protomartyr, and from its situation. This church is of great antiquity, and was originally a chapel belonging to the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul’s, who, between 1171 and 1181, granted it to the Prior and Abbot of Butley, in Suffolk. It was made parochial in 1456, under the patronage of the said prior and abbot, till its suppression by Henry VIII., when it came to the crown. In 1577 Queen Elizabeth granted the patronage, together with the church and rectory, to Thomas Paskins and others; and in 1590, to William Daniel, serjeant at law, and other parishioners; which rectory impropriate, and right of advowson, have been held by the parish, in fee farm of the crown, ever since.

The ancient church shared the common late in the great fire of 1666, and the present structure was finished in 1676, from the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. The advowson is a vicarage, in the city, archdeaconry and diocese of London, and in the patronage of the parishioners. The present incumbent is the Rev. Josiah Pratt, who was elected by the parishioners in 1823.

St. STEPHEN, Walbrook, the Church of, is situated at the north east corner of Walbrook, and is dedicated, like the preceding, to the patronage of St. Stephen. There is mention in ancient records of a church dedicated to the same saint, near this spot, but on the opposite side of the brook, prior to 1135. In 1428, Robert Chicheley, �???Mayor of London, purchased the ground now occupied by the present church and cemetery of the Grocers’ Company, and the new church was finished in 1439. In 1432, Robert Whittington, Citizen and Draper, Knight of the Bath, purchased the advowson from the Duke of Bedford.

From him it passed into a family named Lee, one of whom presented to it in 1474, and afterwards gave it to the Grocers Company, in whom the patronage has remained ever since.

The old church was destroyed by the great fire of 1666, and the present much celebrated edifice erected its place, by Sir Christopher Wren. The first stone was laid on the 16th of October, 1672, in the presence of the Lord Mayor, (Sir George Waterman) several members of the Grocers’ Company, the surveyor general, (Sir Christopher Wren) and other persons of distinction. It was built at the public expense, except the wainscotting and pewing, which were given by the Grocers’ Company, the patrons of the living.

This church is reckoned by many persons to be Wren’s masterpiece; but, however ingenious it may be in its plan, and excellent in construction, the panelling and foliage of the cupolas are in bad taste, parts of the vaulting are too complicated for real beauty, and are much inferior in design and execution, to some of the exquisite examples in St. Paul’s. The plan is extremely simple, yet the church is not calculated to contain so numerous a congregation, as its dimensions, 75 feet by 56 feet, would warrant. The beauty of the interior of this church arises from its lightness and elegance; and the character of its architect is elevated, by its singular originality. On entering from the street, up a flight of a dozen or more of steps, through a vestibule of dubious obscurity, on opening the handsome folding wainscot doors, a halo of dazzling light flashes at once upon the eye, through the central aperture of the cupola; and a beautiful arrangement of exquisitely proportioned Corinthian columns appear before you. The spacious cupola, and supporting arches expand their airy shapes, springing from almost a point over each of the surrounding columns, upon an architrave cornice of great beauty. The columns are elevated upon pedestals, which are concealed by the pewing, which is moulded into similar proportions; and form when the doors are closed, a species of stylobate. Over the entrance is the organ and charity children’s gallery, and in the corresponding and opposite arcade is the altar; over which is West’s fine historical picture of the Stoning of St. Stephen.

The order of the composition of this elegant church, the arrangement of its parts, and the effect of the whole, show the originality of Wren’s mind in a striking point of view, and its excellencies as a whole, swallow up the trifling fault of the detail. If any one doubt the excellences of Wren as an architect of the first class, let him study and analyse this javel of our art and find fault if he will – but let him first endeavour to surpass it.

This church has been repaired twice in my remembrance, once under the direction of my venerable friend, the late James Peacock, Esq., of the City Surveyor’s Office, who, with a laudable care for the fame of its architect, wisely restored and preserved, but did not attempt to improve.

The parish of St. Bennett Sherehog (which see) was united to this parish after the fire of London, and these united parishes form a rectory; but as the living of St. Bennet’s came to the crown at the dissolution of the monasteries, the Lord Chancellor and the Grocers’ Company present alternately. It is in the city, archdeaconry and diocese of London, and the present rector is�??? the Rev. O. S. Townley, Vicar of Great Totham, who was instituted by the Grocers’ Company in 1784.

St. STEPHEN’S COURT, Westminster, is on the east side of New Palace Yard, by the river Thames.

STEPHEN STREET, Tottenham Court Road, is the second street on the left hand side going from Oxford Street.

STEPNEY, an ancient village eastward of London, but from the contiguity of buildings on every side is now an appendage to our great metropolis. The parish of Stepney was originally of such vast extent, that it contained, and has sent off, as off shoots, the present parishes of St. Mary Stratford-le-Bow, St. Mary Whitechapel, St. Anne Limehouse, St. John Wapping, St. Paul Shadwell, St. George Ratcliffe Highway, Christ Church Spitalfields, and St. Matthew Bethnal Green (see those places).

Although all these parishes have been separated from it, it still remains one of the largest within the Bills of Mortality, and contains the hamlets of Mile End New and Old, Ratcliffe and Poplar. Poplar is also now a separate parish, and Stepney has been again subdivided into districts, and a chapelry. – [see Poplar, St. Dunstan Stepney, and Mile End]

The present church of Stepney is one of the oldest in the county, and there was one on the site in the time of the Saxons. It is remarkable for the often quoted inscription on a stone, said to have been a portion of ancient Carthage, and for the no less often quoted epitaph of;

“Here lies the body of Daniel Saul,
Spitalfields weaver, and – that is all.”

STEPNEY GAP, is the first turning on the left hand side of Stepney Causeway, going from the Commercial Road.

STEPNEY GREEN, is about a quarter of a mile on the right hand side of Stepney, in Mile End Road.

STEPNEY GREEN TERRACE, is a portion of the right hand side of Stepney Green.

STEPNEY OLD SQUARE, Stepney Green, is about the third of a mile on the left hand side of the green, going from Mile End Road.

STEPNEY’S RENTS, Hackney Road, is about eight houses on the right hand side.

STEWARD’S or STEWART’S COURT, Clerkenwell Green, is nearly opposite the Sessions’ House.

STEWARD’S OFFICE, THE, Gray’s Inn, is at the north east corner of South Square, formerly Holborn Court.

STEWARD’S RENTS, Drury Lane, are on the right hand side northward of Prince’s Street.

STEWART’S SCHOOL, is a school founded in 1728, by General Stewart, for twenty poor boys of the parish of St. George, Hanover Square. – [see that parish]

STEWARD STREET. – 1. is in Goswell Street, the fourth turning on the right hand northward of Old Street. – 2. is in Spitalfields, the second turning on the right and left hand sides of Union Street.

STILL ALLEY. – 1. is in Bishopsgate Without, six doors northward of the church. – 2. is in Houndsditch, nearly opposite St. Mary Axe. – 3. is in Blue Gate Fields, Shadwell, the second turning on the right hand.

STILL STAIRS, Horselydown, are at the north end of Potter’s Field’s, going from the bottom of Tooley Street.

STILLWELL COURT, Southwark, is the fifth turning on the left hand side of the Maze, going from Tooley Street.

STOCK EXCHANGE, THE, in Capel Court, Bartholomew Lane, is a building erected from the designs of the late James Peacock, Esq., by subscription, for the purpose of transacting business in the funds, to which none but subscribers admitted by ballot, and conforming to rules, can be admitted. There are four entrances to the building, one from Capel Court, one from Shorter’s Court, Throgmorton Street, one from New Court, in the same Street and one on the side of the Heracles Tavern, in Broad Street.

STOCK EXCHANGE CHARITABLE FUND, THE, was instituted in 1801, for relief of the decayed members of the Stock Exchange, and their unprotected families. John Risdon, Esq., of the Stock Exchange is the Treasurer.

STOCK WEAVER’S ALMS HOUSES, Kingsland Road, nearly half a mile on the right hand side going from Shoreditch Church.

STONE BUILDINGS, Lincoln’s Inn, are at the first turning on the right hand side going from opposite Chancery Lane. They overlook Lincoln’s Inn Fields, and are from the designs of Sir Robert Taylor, of the Corinthian order of architecture, but are still incomplete.

STONE COURT, Westminster, is the first turning on the right hand side of Laundry Yard, Great Peter Street, going from that street.

STONE’S END, Southwark, is at the south end of Blackman Street, and is the spot from which most of the admeasurements of the Surrey roads are taken.

STONE’S ROW, Somers Town, is about the third of a mile on the left hand side of the New Road, going from King’s Cross, Battle Bridge.

STONE STAIRS, Ratcliffe, are on the west side of the India Company’s Warehouses in Broad Street.

STONE STAIRS COURT, Ratcliffe, is opposite the above named stairs.

STONE YARD, Southwark, is about twenty houses on the right hand side of Queen Street, going from Union Street.

STONECUTTER’S ALLEY, Blackfriars, is at the south end of Cock Court, going from Ludgate Hill.

STONECUTTER’S BUILDINGS, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, is about seventeen houses on the left hand side of Little Queen Street, going from High Holborn.

STONECUTTER’S COURT, Little St. Martin’s Lane, about thirteen houses on the right hand from the west end of Long Acre.

STONECUTTER’S STREET, Farringdon Street, is the first turning on the left hand from Fleet Street, extending in front of Farringdon Market to Shoe Lane.

STONECUTTER’S YARD, Southwark, is on the left hand side of Kent Street, going from behind St. George’s Church.

STONEY LANE. – 1. is in Gravel Lane, Houndsditch, the third turning on the right hand side. – 2. is in Tooley Street, about a third of a mile on the left hand from London Bridge.

STONEY STREET, Southwark, forms part of the west side of the Borough Market, and extends to Clink Street.

STORE STREET, GREAT, Tottenham Court Road, is the fourth turning on the right hand side, going from Oxford Street.

STORE STREET, LITTLE, is a few houses on the right hand side of the preceding.

STORY’S GATE, St. James’s Park, is at Great George Street, Westminster.

STRACEY STREET, St. Giles’s, is the second turning on the right �???hand side of Monmouth Street, going from Broad Street.

STRAND, THE, is the street which runs parallel to the Thames, from Temple Bar to Northumberland House, Charing Cross. It derives its name from being the ancient Strand of the north beach of the Thames, between the City and the village of Charing.

STRAND LANE, Strand, is nearly opposite the New Church, and leads to Surrey Stairs.

STRANGER’S FRIEND SOCIETY, THE, for visiting and relieving the Distressed Poor at their own Habitations, was founded in 1785, for the above charitable purposes. The metropolis is divided into districts, to which certain visitors are appointed. The office is at No. 8, Queen Street, Cheapside. H. Clarke, Esq., No. 52, New Bond Street, Treasurer; and W. Cooper, No. 8, Queen Street, Cheapside, Secretary.

STRAHAN’S CHARITY, is a fund left to the guardianship of the Stationers’ Company, by William Strahan, Esq., in 1784, of £1,000, the dividends of which are distributed at Christmas, equally among five poor journeymen printers, natives of England or Wales, and freemen of the Company, to be selected by the court, and five poor journeymen printers, natives of Scotland, whether free of the Company or not. – [see Stationers’ Hall]

STRATFORD MEWS, Mary-le-bone Lane, are the first turning on the left hand side of the lane, going from Oxford Street.

STRATFORD PLACE, Oxford Street, is opposite South Molton Street.

STREATHAM MEWS, Bloomsbury, are on the north side of Streatham Street.

STREATHAM STREET, Bloomsbury, is about six houses up Charlotte Street, southward of Great Russell Street.

STREET’S BUILDINGS, Grosvenor Square, are in Mount Street, about six houses eastward of Park Street.

STRETTON STREET, Piccadilly, is the first turning westward of Berkeley Street.

STRINGER’S ROW, Rotherhithe, is the first turning on the left hand side of the Lower Road to Deptford, going from the east side of Paradise Row.

STRUTTON GROUND, Westminster, is the continuation of Great Chapel Street, going from the Broadway.

SUBPŒNA OFFICE, THE, is in Roll’s Yard, Chancery Lane. The hours of business are from 11 to 2, and from 5 to 8, in Term; and from 11 to 2, in Vacation.

SUFFOLK COURT, Southwark, is about seven houses on the right hand side of Harrow Street in the Mint, going from Mint Street.

SUFFOLK LANE, Upper Thames Street, is the fifth turning on the right hand side, going from London Bridge. Merchant Taylors’ School, and the residence of the head master, is on the eastern side of this street. – [see Merchant Taylors’ School]

SUFFOLK MEWS, Middlesex Hospital, is on the west side of Suffolk Street.

SUFFOLK PLACE, Pall Mall East, is seven houses on the right hand side of Cockspur Street.

SUFFOLK PLACE, Shoreditch, is the first turning on the left hand side of Bateman’s Row, going from the Curtain Road.

SUFFOLK STREET, Middlesex Hospital, is three houses westward of the Hospital; it extends from Charles Street to Union Street.

SUFFOLK STREET GALLERY, is a series of picture galleries, in Suffolk Street, built from the designs of the editor of this�??? work, for the Society of British Artists. – [see Artists, British Society of]

SUFFOLK STREET. – 1. GREAT, is in Pall Mall East, at the back of the Haymarket Theatre. – 2. LITTLE, is in the Haymarket, seven houses on the right hand side, going from Cockspur Street. – 3. is in Cannon Street Road, St. George’s in the East, a few houses on the right hand side, going from the Commercial Road. – 4. GREAT, is in Blackman Street, Southwark, about sixteen houses on the left hand from the King’s Bench Prison. – 5. LITTLE, is the third turning on the right hand in the preceding.

SUGAR LOAF COURT. – 1. is in Dorset Street, Salisbury Square, Fleet Street. – 2. is in Upper Thames Street, nearly opposite Queenhithe. – 3. is in Long Alley, Finsbury, the fifth turning on the left hand from Eldon Street. – 4. is in Bishopsgate Street Without, a few houses on the left hand from Sun Street. – 5. is in Angel Alley, Bishopsgate Street Without, the third turning on the left hand. – 6. is in Holywell Lane, Shoreditch, the third turning on the left hand. – 7. is in Leadenhall Street, opposite Creechurch Lane, leading to Fenchurch Street. – 8. is on the left hand side of Bermondsey Street, going from Tooley Street. – 9. is in Essex Street, Whitechapel, the first turning on the right hand. – 10. is in Swan Street, Goodman’s Fields.

SUMMER STREET, Leather Lane, is twelve houses on the right hand side of Eyre Street, going from the north end of Leather Lane.

SUMMER’S BUILDINGS, Bishopsgate Without, are a few houses on the right hand side of the street, going from the church.

SUN ALLEY. – 1. is in Cripplegate, the third turning on the right hand side, going from Barbican. – 2. is in Upper East Smithfield, nearly opposite Butcher Row.

SUN COURT. – 1. is in Sun Alley, Golden Lane. – 2. is in Milton Street, Cripplegate. – 3. is in Cloth Fair. – 4. is in Threadneedle Street. – 5. is in Little Bell Alley, Finsbury. – 6. is in Aldgate High Street. – 7. is in Curzon Street, Mayfair.

SUN FIRE OFFICE, THE, is in Cornhill, and a branch office for the west end of the town, in Craig’s Court, Charing Cross.

It was established in 1710, for insuring houses and other property from loss and damage by fire. This office, which was the first that took insurances beyond the bills of mortality, was projected by Mr. John Povey, about 1706, who having carried it on for some time with success, conveyed his right to certain shareholders, who, by a deed of settlement, of the 7th of April, 1710, erected themselves into a society, and thereby founded the present successful company.

Its affairs are now under the management of twenty two Directors, of whom Charles Pole, Esq., is Treasurer; and Charles Bell Ford, Esq., Secretary. There are also, John Richards, Esq., Office Secretary; Eden Harwood, Esq., Accomptant; and Charles Pilkington, Esq., Surveyor of Buildings.

SUN NEWSPAPER OFFICE, THE, is in the Strand, a few doors beyond Waterloo Bridge.

SUN SQUARE, Bishopsgate, is about eighteen houses on the left hand side of Sun Street, going from Bishopsgate Street.

SUN STREET, Bishopsgate Street Without, is about the sixth of a mile on the left hand side of the street, going from the church.

SUN TAVERN FIELDS, Shadwell, is on the north side of Shadwell High Street. In this place a Roman cemetery was discovered about 1615, wherein were found two coffins, one of stone, which contained the�??? body of a man, and the other of lead, finely embossed with scallop shells, that of a woman, at whose head and feet were two urns, each three feet high, and at the sides several beautiful red earthen bottles, with a number of lachrymatories of hexagonal and octagonal forms. On each side of the exhumed bones were two ivory sceptres, eighteen inches in length, and upon the breast of the female, a small child, beautifully carved. According to the opinion of Sir Robert Cotton, the female must have been the wife of some prince, or Roman prætor, from the decorations of the coffin, and the relics found within it. In this place were also discovered several urns with Roman coins, inscribed on the obverse, “Imp. Pupienus Maximus P. S.” and on the reverse, “Patrus Senatus.” Some years ago, was also discovered in this place, a mineral spring, impregnated with sulphur, vitriol, steel and antimony, and was esteemed a great antiscorbutic, and is reputed to have performed many cures, in leprosy, scurvy, scald head and other cutaneous disorders.

SURGEONS’ COLLEGE. [see College of Surgeons]

SURREY ASYLUM, New Kent Road, is a charitable institution for the Employment and Reformation of Discharged Prisoners. P. I. Butt, Esq., Dulwich, Honorary Secretary.

SURREY CANAL DOCK, Rotherhithe, is about a quarter of a mile below the church.

SURREY CHAPEL, Blackfriars’ Road, is about a quarter of a mile on the left hand side of the road, going from Blackfriars’ Bridge. It was built, and has been established, by the Rev. Rowland Hill.

SURREY DISPENSARY, Union Street, Southwark, is situated near Union Hall, and was established in 1777, for the usual purposes of such institutions, for the Poor of the Borough of Southwark and its Vicinity. It is supported by voluntary contributions, and its benefits are extended to the Borough of Southwark and Vicinity, from Westminster Bridge round by Lambeth, Vauxhall, Kennington Lane and Walworth, to Rotherhithe Church. The present officers are, Viscount Middleton, President; Earl Spencer, Lord Grantley, Viscount Althorp, and eight other Vice Presidents; Florence Young, Esq., Treasurer; Charles Ferguson Forbes, M.D., George H. Roe, M.D., and J. Whiting, M.D., Physicians; John A, Gilham, Esq., and George Pilcher, Esq., Surgeons and Accoucheurs; John Staddon, Apothecary; W. F. Carter, No. 48, High Street, Secretary; and Mr. Henry Orchard, Weston Street, Southwark, Collector.

SURREY INSTITUTION, for the Discharge and Relief of Persons imprisoned for Debt, in the County Gaol, was instituted in 1812, for the above mentioned purpose. H.R.H. the Duke of Gloucester, Patron; fifteen Vice Presidents; Thomas Harrison, Esq., of Streatham, Treasurer; Rev. W. Mann, A.M., Secretary; Mr. Hope, Collector.

SURREY PLACE, Strand, is about eight houses on the right hand side of Surrey Street, going from the Strand.

SURREY PLACE, Rotherhithe, is parallel to part of the west side of Lower Queen, Street.

SURREY PLACE., Kent Road, is about the third of a mile on the right hand side of the road, going from the Bricklayers’ Arms.

SURREY ROAD or GREAT SURREY STREET, Blackfriars’ Road, begins at the southern end of Blackfriars’ Bridge, and extends to the Obelisk by the Surrey Theatre.

SURREY ROW, Blackfriars’ Road, is the second turning on the left hand beyond Surrey Chapel.

SURREY SQUARE, Kent Road, is the first turning on the right hand below East Lane.

SURREY STAIRS, Str�???and, are at the south end of Surrey Street next the Thames.

SURREY STREET, Strand, is the fourth turning on the left hand going from Temple Bar.

SURREY STREET, GREAT, Blackfriars’ Road, is the continuation of it towards the Obelisk.

SURREY STREET, NEW, Blackfriars’ Road, is part of the west side of the road from Stamford Street to Christ Church.

SURVEYOR GENERAL’S OFFICE. – [see Board of Works]

SURVEYOR OF CROWN LANDS OFFICE, is in Somerset Place. – [see Woods and Forests]

SURVEYOR OF PORT OF LONDON OFFICE, is at Guildhall, near the library, and at No. 9, St. Bride’s Avenue, Fleet Street. Mr. James Elmes, Surveyor of the Port of London. – [see Harbour Master’s Office]

SUSANNAH PLACE, Shoreditch, is part of the west side of the Curtain Road, near Old Street Road.

SUSANNAH ROW, Shoreditch, is the fifth turning on the left hand side of the Curtain Road, going from Worship Street.

SUSSEX PLACE, Regent’s Park, is on the south western portion of the park, and is a row of handsome mansions, named after H.R.H. the Duke of Sussex. They are a picturesque design by Mr. Nash, with some peculiarly useless and ugly cupolas.

SUTTON’S COURT, Bishopsgate Within, is about twelve houses southward of the church.

SUTTON STREET, Soho Square, is on the east side, and extends into Crown Street.

SUTTON STREET, LITTLE, the first turning on the left hand side of the preceding.

SUTTON STREET, GREAT, Clerkenwell, is nearly opposite Old Street, and extends into St. John Street.

SUTTON STREET, LITTLE, is about six houses northward of the preceding.

SUTTON STREET, Maze Pond Road, Southwark, extends from the south end of Guy’s Hospital towards Snow’s Fields.

SWALLOW GARDENS, Rosemary Lane, are the sixth turning on the left hand from the Minories.

SWAN ALLEY. – 1. is in St. Ann’s Court, Wardour Street. – 2. is in St. John’s Street, Clerkenwell, the fourth turning on the left hand. – 3. GREAT, is in Coleman Street, the fifth turning on the right hand from Lothbury. – 4. LITTLE, is the east continuation of the preceding into Little Bell Alley.

SWAN COURT. – 1. is in Bream’s Buildings, Chancery Lane, at the east end. – 2. is in Golden Lane, St. Luke’s, the first turning on the right hand in Cowheel Alley. – 3. is in Swan Street, Bethnal Green, four houses on the right hand from Church Street, near Brick Lane. – 4. is in Middlesex Street, the fifth turning on the right hand. – 5. is in Mansell Street, Goodman’s Fields, two houses northward of Swan Street. – 6. is in Rosemary Lane, on the west side of White’s Yard. – 7. is in William Street, Blackfriars’ Road, nearly opposite Pitt Street, and leads to Gravel Lane.

SWAN LANE, OLD, Upper Thames Street, is about sixteen houses on the left hand going from London Bridge.

SWAN LANE, Rotherhithe, is about a furlong below the church.

SWAN PLACE, Kent Road, is the fourth turning on the right hand below the Bricklayers’ Arms.

SWAN STREET. – 1. is in Chu�???rch Street, Bethnal Green, ten houses westward of Brick Lane. – 2. is in the Minories, about the middle of the east side.

SWAN YARD. – 1. is in the Strand, opposite Somerset House, and leads into Whitehall Yard. – 2. is in Tothill Street, Westminster, the first turning on the right hand from the west end of the Abbey. – 3. is in Shoreditch High Street, nearly opposite Holywell Lane. – 4. is in Whitechapel High Street, about ten houses westward of Red Lion Street. – 5. is in Mile End Road, the third turning on the left hand, eastward of the Old Globe. – 6. is in Blackman Street, Southwark, on the south side of St. George’s Church.

SWAN AND HOOP PASSAGE, Cornhill, is eleven houses on the right hand from the Mansion House.

SWEDISH CHURCH, Prince’s Square, St. George’s in the East, is the building in the centre of the square, and is used by the Swedes resident in London.

SWEED’S COURT, Trinity Lane, is six houses on the left hand from Bow Lane towards Old Fish Street.

SWEDE’S COURT, Cripplegate, is on the left hand side of Moor Lane, and leads to Butler’s Alley and Milton Street.

SWEDELAND COURT, Bishopsgate Without, is about a furlong from the church.

SWEDELAND COURT, Trinity Square, is a few houses on the left hand side of Victualler’s Office and Quay, going towards the Mint.

SWEETAPPLE COURT, Bishopsgate Without, is about eight houses southward of Sun Street.

SWEETING’S ALLEY, Cornhill, is on the eastern side of the Royal Exchange, and extends into Threadneedle Street. Before the fire of London this alley contained only one house, a spacious building which belonged to a merchant of the name of Sweeting.

SWEETING’S RENTS, Cornhill, is on the east side of the preceding.

SWINTON STREET, Gray’s Inn Lane, is about three quarters of a mile on the right hand side going from Middle Row, Holborn.

SWISS CHAPEL, THE, Seven Dials, is on the right hand side of Moor Street, going from Monmouth Street towards Crown Street.

St. SWITHIN’S, London Stone, the Church of, is situated at the south west corner of St. Swithin’s Lane, Cannon Street, and derives its name from being dedicated to St. Swithin, Bishop of Winchester and Chancellor to King Egbert, who died in 806. By ancient records it appears there was a church upon this spot, dedicated to the same saint, prior to 1330. This church was destroyed by the fire of London, and the present, plain and substantial building erected by Sir Christopher Wren, in its stead.

The patronage of this church appears to have been anciently in the prior and convent of Tortington, in the diocese of Chester, in whom it continued till the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII., who granted it to the Earl of Oxford, (see Oxford Court, Cannon Street) who soon after disposed of it, and it still continues in private hands. Against the southern side of this church, next to Cannon Street, is carefully preserved that relic of antiquity, London Stone. – [see that article]

On the rebuilding of this church, the parish of St. Mary Bothall or Bothaw (see that church) was united to that of St. Swithin, by act of parliament.

The living is a rectory in the city of London, in the province of Canterbury, and in the alternate patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury and Willia�???m Thorpe, Esq. The present rector is the Rev. H. G. Watkins, who was instituted by the latter in 1806.

St. SWITHIN’S LANE, Lombard Street, is the first turning on the right hand side, going from the Mansion House.

St. SWITHIN’S MOTHER AND INFANT’S SOCIETY, is an association for Relief of Poor Married Women during confinement, if resident within one mile and a half from St. Swithin’s Church. This society is conducted by Mrs. Bell, No. 12, St. Swithin’s Lane, Treasurer; and a committee of twelve ladies, assisted by Mrs A. Rayner, Matron, No. 2, Salters’ Hall Court.

St. SWITHIN’S ASSOCIATION, is a Branch Society in support of the objects of the Prayer Book and Homily Society. This association is under the management of the Rev. H. G. Watkins, Rector of St. Swithin’s, President; Joseph Sharp, Esq., Treasurer; Ford Hale, Esq. and John Adeney, Esq., Joint Secretaries; and a committee of twenty four members.

SYMOND’S INN, Chancery Lane, is about thirty two houses on the right hand side, going from Fleet Street. It is neither an Inn of Court, or Chancery; but contains several public and private offices, among the former of which is a Register Office, and of the latter several Masters in Chancery and solicitors.

SYMONDS STREET, Sloane Square, is at the north west corner of the square; it leads into South Street and the Kings Road.

SYNAGOGUE, THE, GREAT, Duke’s Place, is a few houses on the left hand side of Duke Street.

SYNAGOGUE, THE, (for Dutch Jews) Leadenhall Street, is about twenty houses on the left hand side, going from Aldgate. – [see Bricklayers Hall]

SYNAGOGUE, THE, (for Dutch Jews) is in Church Court, Fenchurch Street, on the south side of the church.

SYNAGOGUE, THE, (for Portuguese Jews) is in Bevis Marks, a few yards on the right hand side in Heneage Lane. – [see Bevis Marks]

SYNAGOGUE, THE, (for German Jews) is in Denmark Court, Strand, the first house on the right hand side, going from the Strand.

T

TABERNACLE, THE, Moorfields, is a large, low, unsightly building covered with pan-tiles, on the west side of Tabernacle Walk, Finsbury, built originally by the Rev. George Whitfield, the rival of John Wesley, in the establishment of a sect of his own. There was also another in Tottenham Court Road, built by the same sectarian, which is now falling to decay, being unused.

TABERNACLE ALLEY, Fenchurch Street, is opposite Mincing Lane.

TABERNACLE PLACE, City Road, is at the north end of Tabernacle Walk.

TABERNACLE ROW, City Road, is the third turning on the right hand side, going from Finsbury Square.

TABERNACLE WALK, Finsbury, is the continuation of Windmill Street.

TALBOT COURT, Gracechurch Street, is a turning that leads into Little Eastcheap.

TALLOW CHANDLER’S HALL, Dowgate Hill, is five houses on the right hand side from Cannon Street, a handsome and spacious building in the style of Wren, with a colonnade of Tuscan arches.

The Tallow Chandler’s Company was incorporated by Edward IV., in 1460, by the name of “The Master and Keepers of the Art and Mystery of Tallow Chandlers of the City of London.” It is th�??e twenty-first on the city list.

TANFIELD COURT, Temple, is on the east side of Lamb’s Buildings.

TASH COURT, Gray’s Inn Lane, is the first turning on the left hand side of Tash Street, going from Gray’s Inn Lane.

TASH STREET, Gray’s Inn Lane, is on the right hand side of the way going from Middle Row, Holborn.

TATTLE COURT, Bermondsey Street, is about six houses northward of Snow’s Fields.

TAVISTOCK COURT, Covent Garden, is about eight houses on the left hand side of Tavistock Street, going from Southampton Street.

TAVISTOCK MEWS, Bedford Square, is three houses on the left hand side of Tavistock Street, going from Tottenham Court Road.

TAVISTOCK MEWS, Russell Square, is the first turning on the left hand side of Little Coram Street, going from Great Coram Street.

TAVISTOCK PLACE, Tavistock Square, is the second turning on the right hand northward of Russell Square.

TAVISTOCK SQUARE, is on the north side of Russell Square, and is named after the second title of the Duke of Bedford, upon whose estate it is built.

TAVISTOCK STREET, Bedford Square, is by the south west corner of the square, and extends into Tottenham Court Road.

TAVISTOCK STREET, Covent Garden, is the first turning on the right hand in Southampton Street.

TAX OFFICE, Somerset Place, is at the rear of the building which forms the eastern side of the quadrangle. Robert Mitford, Esq., Chairman; C. P. Rushworth, W. R. Bradshaw, and Lieut. Gen. Sir F. Campbell, K.C.B., Commissioners; Edward Bates, Esq., Secretary, and Benjamin Groom, Esq., Comptroller.

TAYLOR’S COURT. – 1. is in Bow Lane, Cheapside, three houses from Great St. Thomas Apostle. – 2. is in St. John Street Road, a few yards on the right hand side of Taylor’s Row. – 3. is in Hare Walk, Hoxton, the first turning on the left hand from opposite the Ironmonger’s Alms Houses, Kingsland Road. – 4. is in Farmer Street, Shadwell, the third turning on the left hand from Shadwell High Street.

TAYLOR’S ROW, St. John Street Road, is the first turning north of Ashby Street.

TEMPLE, THE, is a number of buildings, quadrangles, courts, &c., used as chambers for barristers, &c., which are to be found under their respective names as Hare Court, Pump Court, &c. (which see). It is divided into two parts, the Inner and Middle Temple, which are occupied and governed by two societies. It derives its name from having been anciently the residence of the Knights Templars, a society established about the year 1118. The Knights Templars let their residence, in 1324, to the students of the Common Law, in whose possession the Temple has been ever since. It extends from White Friars nearly to Essex Street, and has two halls, two libraries, a fine church, (see Temple Church) very airy gardens on the bank of the Thames, and several spacious quadrangles.

Its present officers are, the Rev. Charles Benson, M.A., Master; the Rev. William Henry Rowlatt, M.A., Reader and Librarian; Sir Alexander Croke, Knt., Treasurer of the Inner Temple; James Gardener, Esq., Sub Treasurer; John Chimey, Esq., Treasurer of the Middle Temple; William Eldred, Esq., Sub Treasurer; Thomas Quayle, Master of the Library; and John Bray, Library Keeper.

TEMPLE BAR, Fleet Street, is�??? the western extremity of the city, in that direction, and consists of a carriage way and two postern gates for foot passengers. It is from the designs of Sir Christopher Wren.

TEMPLE CHURCH, THE, is a very ancient church, built by the Knights Templars, and recently very handsomely restored by Mr. Smirke. It escaped the fire of London. The clergyman is appointed by the King, by letters patent, without institution and induction, and he is called custos or master. It is in the City of London, and exempt from all jurisdiction. The present master is the Rev. Christopher Benson, M. A., who was appointed in 1826.

TEMPLE COURT, Inner Temple Lane, is a few yards on the left hand side, going from Fleet Street.

TEMPLE GARDENS, Temple, are upon the bank of the Thames, on the south side of the Temple, and are a very pleasant promenade, to which the public are admitted under certain regulations.

TEMPLE LANE, Temple, is the first turning on the left hand eastward of the King’s Bench Walk.

TEMPLE LANE, INNER, Fleet Street, is about sixteen houses on the right hand side, going from Temple Bar.

TEMPLE LANE, MIDDLE, Fleet Street, is four houses on the right hand side, going from Temple Bar.

TEMPLE PLACE, Blackfriars’ Road, is about half a mile from the Bridge, and is named after Temple West, Esq., the ground landlord.

TEMPLE STREET, Whitefriars Dock, is the last turning on the right hand side of Water Lane.

TEMPLE STREET, St. George’s Fields, is the first turning on the left hand side of Prospect Place, going from the Elephant and Castle.

TEMPLE STAIRS, Middle Temple Lane, are on the east side of Temple Bar.

TENNIS COURT. – 1. is in Middle Row, Holborn, leading to Northumberland Court and Southampton Buildings. – 2. is in Church Entry. Blackfriars, the first turning on the left from Shoemakers’ Row. – 3. is in King Street, Southwark, the first turning on the right hand side, going from Southwark High Street.

TENNIS PLACE, is near the preceding.

TENTH’S OFFICE, THE, is in Garden Court, Temple. The hours of business are, every day, Sundays and holidays excepted, from 10 to 2. Richard Harrison, Esq., Remembrancer; and Thomas Venables, Esq., Receiver.

TENT’S YARD, Golden Square, is nearly opposite Great Pulteney Street.

TENTER ALLEY, Finsbury, is the sixth turning on the left hand side of Little Moorfields, going from Fore Street.

TENTER GROUND, Goodman’s Fields, is about six houses on the left hand side, going from Mansel Street.

TENTERDEN STREET, Hanover Square, is at the north west, corner of the square, and extends into Shepherd Street.

TERLING STREET, St. George’s in the East, is the last turning on the left hand side of Albion Street, going from the Commercial Road.

TERRACE, THE TEMPLE, is the north side, between Fig Tree Court and King’s Bench Walk.

TERRACE, THE, Mary-le-bone, is a few houses on the right hand side of High Street, going from the New Road.

TERRACE, THE, Tottenham Court Road, is about the third of a mile from Oxford Street.

TERRACE, THE, Gray’s Inn Lane, extending from the King’s Road to James Street.

TEWKSBURY COURT, Whitechapel High Street, is nearly opposite Red Lion Street.

THACKET COURT, Vine Street, St. Martin’s Lane, Charing Cross, is near the north end of Church Lane.

THAMES STREET, LOWER, is parallel to the Thames, and extends from Tower Hill to London Bridge. It is so called as being below that bridge.

THAMES STREET, UPPER, is the continuation of the preceding, from London Bridge to Earl Street.

THAMES STREET, Southwark, is the first street from Clink Street, going towards Blackfriars’ Bridge.

THAMES STREET, Rotherhithe, is parallel to and between Russell Street and the Thames.

THANET PLACE, Strand, is six houses on the left hand, beyond Temple Bar.

THATCHED HOUSE COURT. – 1. LITTLE, is in St. James’s Street, three houses on the left hand side, going from St. James’s Street, near the Palace. – 2. is in the Strand, nearly opposite Adam Street, Adelphi.

THAVIE’S INN, Holborn Hill, is six houses west of St. Andrew’s Churchyard, and is one of the Inns of Chancery. It derives its name from its founder, John Thavie, who lived in the reign of Edward III. It is a member, and under the government of Lincoln’s Inn.

THAYER STREET, Manchester Square, is four houses on the left hand side of Hinde Street.

THEATRICAL FUND, COVENT GARDEN. – [see Covent Garden Theatrical Fund]

THEATRE ROYAL COVENT GARDEN. – [see Covent Garden Theatre]

THEATRICAL FUND, DRURY LANE. – [see Drury Lane Theatrical Fund]

THEATRE ROYAL DRURY LANE. – [see Drury Lane Theatre]

THEOBALD’S ROAD, Red Lion Square, is the third coach turning, on both the, right and the left hand in Red Lion Street.

St. THOMAS the apostle, the Church of, stood before the fire of London in the cemetery, at the corner of Queen Street, Cheapside, but since the fire of London the parish has been united to that of St. Mary, Aldermary, which see.

St. THOMAS THE APOSTLE, GREAT, Queen Street, Cheapside, is the third street on the right hand from Cheapside.

St. THOMAS THE APOSTLE, LITTLE, Queen Street, is the continuation of Cloak Lane to Bow Lane.

St. THOMAS APOSTLE COURT, Great St. Thomas the Apostle, is a few yards eastward of Queen Street.

St. THOMAS, Southwark, the Church of, is situated on the north side of St. Thomas’s Street, and was originally erected for the service of the adjoining hospital of the same name (which see); but from the Increase of houses and inhabitants it was made parochial, and a chapel built in the hospital. It is, therefore, neither a rectory nor a vicarage, but a sort of impropriate donative in the gift of the governors of St. Thomas’s Hospital.

This church is in the county and archdeaconry of Surrey, and in the diocese of Winchester. Its present incumbent is the Rev. T. W. Mercer, who was instituted by the aforesaid governors in 1827.

St. THOMAS’S CHURCHYARD, St. Thomas’s Street, Southwark, is the second tu�???rning on the right hand side going from the Borough High Street.

THOMAS COURT, Golden Lane, is the third turning on the left hand side of Ball Court, going from Golden Lane.

THOMAS COURT or PLACE, Bethnal Green, is the first turning on the right hand side of Old Nicol’s Street, going from Nicol’s Row.

St. THOMAS’S HOSPITAL, Southwark, is situated on the eastern side of the High Street, and was established for the same purposes as that of St. Bartholomew. Camden and Maitland both agree in attributing its foundation to a casual fire in this neighbourhood in 1207, which destroying the priory of St. Mary Overies, the canons erected at a small distance, an occasional building to answer the same purpose till their monastery could be rebuilt. In 1428, one of the abbots granted the foundation lands to Nicholas Buckland, Master of the Hospital, and it so remained till the dissolution of religious houses in the reign of Henry VIII., when this fell with the rest.

In 1551 the Lord Mayor and Citizens having purchased the manor of Southwark of King Edward VI., they immediately repaired and enlarged it; and in 1553 the king incorporated a society of persons for its government, in common with the four other royal hospitals, of St. Bartholomew’s, Bethlem, Bridewell and Christ’s (see those hospitals). Although this hospital was not damaged by the great fire of 1666, yet many of its possessions were destroyed by its ravages, so that, in 1669, a new subscription was opened, and the hospital nearly rebuilt.

This hospital is now in very prosperous circumstances, and its benefits to the poor are incalculable. Together, with the preceding four hospitals, it is governed under the provisions of an act for their better ordinance, passed in 1782, the 22nd George III. c. 77.

It is under the effective management of Christopher Smith, Esq., Alderman, President; Abel Chapman, Esq., Treasurer; the Rev. John Teeson, M. A., Hospitaler; Robert Williams, M. D., John Elliotson, M.D., and Henry Roots, M.D., Physicians; Henry Burton, M.D., Assistant Physician; Benjamin Travers, Joseph H. Green, Professor of Anatomy in the Royal Academy, and Frederick Tyrrell, Esqrs., Surgeons; R. Whitfield, Apothecary; John Wainwright, Clerk; Matthew Ledger, Receiver; William Nash, Steward; Mrs. S. Savery, Matron; Henry Ledger, Surgery Man, and Daniel Wheeler, Butler.

The governors, are the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, ex officio; and an unlimited number of others who qualify by a donation of £50, together with the following members of the Court of Common Council, namely, Wm. Row, Esq., for the Ward of Cordwainers; Lucas Birch, Esq., Cornhill; Gilpin Gorst, Esq., Deputy, Tower; J. F. De Grave, Esq., Bread Street; Miles Filby, Esq., Farringdon Within; Henry J. Elmes, Esq., Vintry; John Prested, Esq., Portsoken; Samuel Wilson, Esq., Billingsgate; John Lorkin, Esq., Deputy, Aldersgate,

THOMAS PLACE, Bethnal Green, is part of the right hand side of Crabtree Row, a few houses from the Hackney Road.

THOMAS PLACE, Ratcliffe, is about the middle of the west side of Pell Street, entering by Ratcliffe Highway.

THOMAS ROW, Bethnal Green Road, is the second turning on the right hand side of Charles Street.

THOMAS STREET. – 1. is in Bethnal Green Road, the third turning on the right hand side eastward of the Turnpike. – 2. is in Mile End New Town, the second turning on the right hand side going from Whitechapel Road. – 3. is in Ducking Pond Row, Whitechapel Road, opposite Grayhound Lane in the said road. – 4. is in Brick Lane, Bethna�???l Green, or Spitalfields, about fourteen houses on the left hand from Church Street. – 5. is in the Curtain Road, Shoreditch, the fourth turning on the left hand from Worship Street. – 6. is in the Commercial Road. Mile End Old Town, the fourth turning on the right hand from Cannon Street Road towards Whitechapel. – 7. is in Mary Street, Stepney, the first turning on the left hand from Ocean Street, Cow Lane. – 8. is in St. George’s in the East, about eight houses on the right hand side in Church Lane, from Cable Street. – 9. is in the Kent Road, a few doors on the left hand below the Bricklayers’ Arms. – 10. is in Mead Row, Kent Road, the first turning on the left hand from the said road. – 11. is in Horselydown, opposite George Stairs, and leads to Three Oak Lane.

St. THOMAS’S STREET, Southwark, is the second turning on the left hand side of the Borough High Street, going from London Bridge.

St. THOMAS’S RENTS, Southwark, is the east continuation of the last.

THOMPSON’S PLACE, Bethnal Green, is near the south end of Wilmot Street, going towards the Dog Row.

THOMPSON’S RENTS, Bishopsgate Without, is the second turning on the left hand side of Half Moon Street, going from Bishopsgate Street.

THORNEY STREET, Bloomsbury, is the west continuation of Hart Street.

THORNHAUGH STREET, Bedford Square, is the first turning on the right hand side in Francis Street.

THORNHAUGH STREET, UPPER, is the west continuation of the last from Francis Street.

THOROLD STREET, Bethnal Green, is nearly opposite the church in Church Street.

THRAWL STREET, Spitalfields, is the second turning on the left hand side of Brick Lane, from opposite the church, Whitechapel.

THREE ARROW COURT, Chancery Lane, is three houses northward of Carey Street.

THREE COLTS’ COURT. – 1. is in Worship Street, Holywell Mount. – 2. is in Angel Alley, Bishopsgate Without, the continuation of Slade’s Buildings. – 3. is in Three Colts’ Street, Limehouse.

THREE COLTS’ STREET, Limehouse, is on the eastern side of the church.

THREE COLTS’ YARD, Mile End Road, is the second turning on the left hand side below the Old Globe.

THREE CRANE COURT, Westminster, is about the middle of the left hand side from James Street.

THREE CROWN COURT. – 1. is in White’s Alley, Chancery Lane. – 2. is in Garlick Hill, Upper Thames Street. – 3. is in Foster Lane, Cheapside. – 4. is in Jewry Street, Aldgate, the third turning on the right hand from Aldgate.

THREE CROWN SQUARE, Southwark, is about the sixth of a mile on the right hand side of High Street, going from London Bridge.

THREE CUPS’ ALLEY, Shoreditch, is about twenty four houses in High Street, going from Holywell Lane.

THREE CUPS’ ALLEY, Lower Shadwell, is the corner of Broad Bridge.

THREE CUPS’ COURT, Lower Shadwell, is the first turning on the right hand side of the preceding.

THREE CUPS’ YARD, Bedford Row, is about six houses in Bedford Street, westward of Bedford Row.

THREE DAGGER COURT, Fore Street, Cripplegate, is nearly opposite Wood Street.

THREE FALCON COURT. – 1. is about a furlong on the right hand side of Fleet Street, going from Farringdon Street. – 2. Fishmonger’s Alley, High Street, Southwark, near St. Margaret’s Hill.

THREE FOX COURT, is in Long Lane, West Smithfield, about twelve houses on the left hand from it.

THREE HAMMER ALLEY, Tooley Street, at the south end of Glean Alley.

THREE HERRING’S COURT. – 1. is in Redcross Street, Cripplegate, the first turning on the left hand from Barbican. – 2. is in Cree Church Lane, the first turning on the right hand from Leadenhall Street.

THREE KINGS’ COURT. – 1. is in Whitecross Street, St. Luke’s. – 2. is in Lombard Street, near Clement’s Lane. – 3. is in the Minories, a few houses on the left hand from Aldgate.

THREE KINGS’ YARD, Berkeley Square, is about fifteen houses on the right hand side of Davies Street, going from Oxford Street.

THREE LEGS’ COURT, Whitecross Street, is about fourteen houses on the left hand side, going from Chiswell Street.

THREE MARINERS’ COURT, Fore Street, Cripplegate, is five houses west of Milton Street.

THREE OAK LANE, Horselydown, is the east continuation of Free School Street.

THREE PIGEONS’ COURT. – 1. is in Angel Alley, Finsbury, the first turning on the left hand side, going from Long Alley. – 2. is in Ray Street, Clerkenwell, the second turning on the left hand side, going from the north west corner of Clerkenwell Green.

THREE TUNS’ ALLEY. – 1. is in Bunhill Row, St. Luke’s. – 2. is in Wentworth Street, Spitalfields, the first turning south parallel to part of it.

THREE TUNS’ COURT. – 1. is in Redcross Street, Cripplegate, a few houses on the left hand side, going from Barbican – 2. is in Miles’s Lane, Cannon Street, three houses on the right hand side, going from Upper Thames Street. – 3. is in Upper Thames Street, three houses on the right hand side, going from London Bridge. – 4. is in White Street, Southwark, about eighteen houses on the left hand side, going from St. George’s Church.

THREE TUNS’ PASSAGE, Ivy Lane, Newgate Street, is a few yards on the right hand side from Newgate Street.

THREE TUNS’ YARD, High Street, Southwark, near St. Margaret’s Hill.

THROGMORTON STREET, is at the north east corner of the Bank of England, and extends from Broad Street to the end of Bartholomew Lane.

THURLOW STREET, Blackfriars’ Road, is the first turning on the right hand side of Pitt Street, going from Great Surrey Street.

TIDEWAITERS’ COURT, Minories, is a few houses on the left hand side of Church Street, going from the Minories.

TIG’S COURT, Southwark, is a few yards on the left hand side of Castle Street, going from Redcross Street.

TILNEY COURT, St. Luke’s, is about eighteen houses west of Bunhill Row.

TILNEY STREET, South Audley Street, is the second turning on the left hand from Curzon Street.

TIMES NEWSPAPER OFFICE, THE, is on the east side of Printing House Square, Water Lane, Blackfriars.

TITCHBOURNE COURT, High Holborn�???, is three houses westward of Great Turnstile.

TITCHBOURNE STREET, Haymarket, is opposite the north end of that street.

TITCHFIELD CHAPEL, Westmoreland Street, Mary-le-bone, is seven houses on the right hand from Great Mary-le-bone Street.

TITCHFIELD STREET, GREAT, Mary-le-bone, is the continuation of Market Street.

TITCHFIELD STREET, LITTLE, Mary-le-bone, is the sixth turning on the left hand going from Oxford Street.

TITCHFIELD STREET, Soho, is six houses on the right hand side of Dean Street, going from Oxford Street.

TOKENHOUSE YARD, Lothbury, is on the north side of the Bank of England.

TOM’S COURT, Grosvenor Square, is the second turning on the left hand side of Duke Street, from Oxford Street.

TONBRIDGE PLACE, Euston Square, is on the south side of the New Road, right and left of Judd Street.

TONBRIDGE STREET, New Road, is the first turning eastward of Judd Street, and reaches from the New Road to Cromer Street, Burton Crescent.

TONGUE YARD, Whitechapel Road, is about thirty six houses, eastward of the church.

TONGUE YARD, LITTLE, Whitechapel Road, is ten houses westward of the preceding.

TOOLEY STREET, Southwark, is the first turning on the left hand side, going from London Bridge. – [see St. Olaves, Southwark]

TOOLEY’S GATEWAY, Tooley Street, is nearly opposite Bermondsey Street.

TOOK’S COURT, Chancery Lane, is eight houses on the left hand side of Cursitor Street, going from Chancery Lane.

TOPPINGS COURT, St. Dunstan’s Hill, is four houses on the left hand side, going from Great Tower Street.

TOPPING’S RENTS, Southwark, is a few houses in Ewer Street going from Duke Street.

TORRINGTON SQUARE, is a newly built square, northward of Keppel Street.

TORRINGTON STREET, Russell Square, is the first turning on the right hand side of Keppel Street, going from the square.

TOTHILL COURT, Westminster, is the third turning on the right hand side of Tothill Street, going from the Abbey.

TOTHILL FIELDS, Westminster, is on the north side of Millbank Walk, by the Thames.

TOTHILL FIELDS SCHOOL, is in Tothill Fields aforesaid.

TOTHILL STREET, Westminster, is on the west side of the Abbey.

TOTHILL STREET, NEW, Westminster, is the first turning on the left hand side of the preceding.

TOTHILL STREET, Little Gray’s Inn Lane, is the first turning on the right hand from Gray’s Inn Lane, Holborn.

TOTTENHAM COURT, New Road, is part of the south side of the New Road, at the corner of Tottenham Court Road. In 1760 it was described as a pleasant village between St. Giles’s in the Fields and Hampstead.

TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD, is, the continuation of High Street, Bloomsbury, to the New Road. It extends from Oxford Street to the end of the Hampstead Road.

TOTTENHAM MEWS, Tottenham Street, is about�??? a furlong from Tottenham Court Road.

TOTTENHAM PLACE, Tottenham Court Road, is the second turning on the left hand from the New Road.

TOTTENHAM STREET, Tottenham Court Road, is the continuation of Chapel Street.

TOTTERBURN ALLEY, Southwark, is the second turning on the left hand side of Duke Street, going from Queen Street.

TOWER OF LONDON, THE, is on the eastern side of the city, by the side of the Thames, between the eastern end of Lower Thames Street and St. Katherine’s.

The earliest account of any fortification on this site, was a small fortress thrown up by William the Norman, in 1076, who, according to Stow, also built, in 1078, that portion which is called the White Tower and appointed Gundulph, Bishop of Rochester, the most celebrated architect of that period, to superintend the work. William Rufus added a castellated tower on the south side, and it was first enclosed by William Longchamp, Bishop of Ely, who, under pretence of guarding against the designs of John the King’s brother, surrounded it with embattled walls, and the present ditch.

In 1239, according to Matthew Paris, Henry III. added to its fortifications, and it is thought that Henry I. built the Lion’s Tower, as Strype mentions it in alluding to the additions made by Edward IV.; and it is known that he introduced the menagerie, which had been formerly kept at Woodstock. Richard III. made some additions to the Tower, and Henry VIII. repaired the White Tower, which was rebuilt in 1638, and after the restoration it was thoroughly repaired under the superintendence of Sir Christopher Wren, and a great number of additional buildings made to it. In 1663, the ditch was cleansed, all the wharfing about it was rebuilt of brick and stone, and sluices made for admitting and retaining the Thames water, as occasion might require.

During some repairs under Sir Christopher Wren, in 1676, the remains of what were supposed to be the two young princes, who were smothered in the Tower by order of Richard III., were discovered, about ten feet below the surface of the ground, in a wooden chest. Wren was ordered, as appears from a manuscript book of orders of the Privy Council, which formerly belonged to the Editor of this work, and is quoted in his Life of Wren, to prepare a tomb with an inscription, which being approved by the king in council, was erected in the north aisle of Henry the Seventh’s chapel, Westminster.

In 1696, Wren reported to the Council the condition of the Tower and its fitness to receive prisoners of state; the reports of which are printed from the above named manuscripts, in the life of that architect.

The present area of the Tower within the walls, is twelve acres and five poles, and the circuit outside of the ditch, 1052 feet. The principal objects of curiosity within the Tower, are, the menagerie of wild beasts in the Lion tower, the Jewel Office, the armoury, the White tower, the ancient chapel and church (see St. Peter Ad Vincula), the Record office, the Beauchamp tower, the Bloody tower, Traitors’ Bridge, and the Mint (see that article), to which the public are admitted by fixed gratuities to the warders who shew them.

The Tower is still used as a state prison, and is under the government of the Duke of Wellington, Constable; General William Loftus, Lieutenant; Lieut. Colonel Sir F. H. Doyle, Bart., Deputy Lieutenant; Captain John H. Elrington, Fort Major; the Rev. Andrew Irvine, M.A., Chaplain; Charles Murray, Esq., Gentleman Porter; Joseph Turtle, Gentleman Jailer; Burg Tomkins, M.D., Physician, — —, Surgeon; James Kirtland, Apotheca�???ry; Louis Gruaz, Yeoman Porter; Thomas B. Ricketts, Esq., Steward of the Tower, the Ancient Court of Record, His Majesty’s Court Leet and Coroner; Thomas Morice, Esq., Deputy Steward; David H. Stable, Esq., Clerk of the Peace; and James W. Lush, Chief Bailiff.

TOWER DOCK, Tower Hill, is on the western side of the Tower, next Billingsgate.

TOWER HAMLETS, THE, is a district under the military jurisdiction of the constable of the Tower, and which greatly exceeds the liberties of that fortress. The places so denominated are twenty one in number, and are severed from the county of Middlesex so far as relates to raising the militia, and are compelled to raise two regiments among themselves, for which purpose the Constable of the Tower, is lord lieutenant of the district. The places so called are, Hackney, Norton Falgate, Shoreditch, Spitalfields, Whitechapel, St. Trinity Minories, East Smithfield, the Tower, extra muros, St. Katherine’s, Wapping, Ratcliffe, Shadwell, Limehouse, Poplar, Blackwall, Bromley, Bow, Old Ford, Mile End and Bethnal Green.

TOWER HAMLET DISPENSARY, Old Gravel Lane, Ratcliffe Highway, was established, in 1792, for diffusing the benevolent services of a dispensary in the preceding district. It is under the government of H.R.H. the Duke of Sussex, Patron; George Byng, Esq., M.P., President; William Mellish, Sampson Hanbury and T. H. Coxhead, Esqs., Vice Presidents; William Mellish, Esq., Treasurer; Frederick Cobb, M.D., Francis Ramsbottom, M.D. and Charles Holland, M.D., Physicians; Abraham Toulmin, Esq., Surgeon; Richard Mackrell, Apothecary; Richard Townsend, Secretary; and J. Talbot, Collector.

TOWER HILL, GREAT, is the open space on the north west side of the Tower. – [see Trinity Square]

TOWER HILL, LITTLE, the space on the east side of the Tower.

TOWER LIBERTIES, THE, include not only the Tower itself, but also Trinity Square, Little Tower Hill, part of East Smithfield, Rosemary Lane, Wellclose Square, the Little Minories, part of Spitalfields, all the streets, lanes, &c., built upon the Old Artillery Ground, which formerly belonged to the Tower, as Artillery Street, French Alley, Duke Street, Steward Street, Gun Street, Fort Street and the courts and alleys within their compass. – [see Tower Hamlets]

TOWER ROYAL, Watling Street, extends from that street to Cloak Lane, and derives its name as having been formerly the residence of the Queens Dowagers of England. – [see College Hill and St. Michael Paternoster Royal]

TOWER STREET, Seven Dials, is the continuation of Little St. Martin’s-le-Grand.

TOWER STREET, GREAT, is the east continuation of Little Tower Street, Eastcheap, and reaches from Idol Lane to Tower Hill.

TOWER STREET, LITTLE, Little Eastcheap, is the continuation of Little Eastcheap to Great Tower Street.

TOWER STREET, St. George’s Fields, is the fourth turning on the right hand side, going from the Obelisk.

TOWER WARD, is the most eastern ward of the city, and derives its name from its contiguity to the Tower, and from its principal avenue, Tower Street. It is bounded on the north by Langbourn Ward, on the east by Tower Hill and part of Aldgate Ward, on the south by the Thames and on the west by Billingsgate Ward. It extends from the Tower eastward, to the middle of the way between Great Dice Quay and Smart’s Quay westward, and from the west corner of Tower Dock on the south to within seventy feet of the north end of Rood Lane on the north.

Within this circuit are Tower Street, part of Thames Street. Seething Lane, Mark Lane, Mincing Lane, Hart Street, Idol Lane, St. Dunstan’s Hill, Harp Lane, Water Lane and Beer Lane, with many others, and a considerable number of courts and alleys. The principal edifices in Tower ward are, the parish churches of St. Dunstan and Allhallows Barking, the Custom House, the Trinity House, the Corn Exchange and the Commercial Hall. – [see those several places]

The ward is governed by an alderman (M. P. Lucas, Esq.) and is divided into twelve municipal precincts, namely, Dolphin, Mincing Lane, Salutation, Rood, Dice Quay, Ralph’s Quay, Bear Quay, Petty Wales, Rose, Seething, Mark Lane and the Angel, and has twelve common councilmen and the other usual ward officers.

TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE, THE, CITY, is in Guildhall, between the north side of the Hall and Basinghall Street. This officer is keeper of the original Charters of the City, the books, rolls, and other records, wherein are registered the acts and proceedings of the corporation. He attends the Courts of Aldermen and Common Council, and certain committees, and takes precedence next to or above the Common Sergeant, according to seniority. The present Town Clerk is Henry Woodthorpe, Esq., L.L.D, &c., &c.

TOWN HALL, THE, Poplar, is about half a mile on the right hand side of the High Street, going from the Commercial Road.

TOWN HALL, THE, Southwark, is on the north side of St. Margaret’s Hill, on the site of the ancient church of St. Margaret-on-the-Hill, It is a modern edifice, decorated with Ionic pilasters, and crowned by a balustrade. In it is held the Court of Justice for Southwark. – [see that Borough]

TOWNSEND COURT, Southwark, is three houses up Queen Street, going from Little Guildford Street.

TRAFALGAR BUILDINGS, City Road, is four houses on the right hand side of Ebenezer Street, going from Trafalgar Street.

TRAFALGAR PLACE. – 1. is in the New Road, Mary-le-bone, the east continuation of Union Buildings. – 2. is in the Hackney Road. – 3. is in Pleasant Row, Stepney, the first turning on the left hand side going from Prospect Place.

TRAFALGAR SQUARE, Stepney, is about the third of a mile on the left hand side of Stepney Green.

TRAFALGAR STREET. – 1. City Road, is nearly opposite Fountain Place. – 2. is in Turville Street, Bethnal Green, the third turning on the left hand side from Church Street near Shoreditch.

TRAFALGAR TERRACE, Stepney, is part of the north side of Cow Lane.

TRANSPORT OFFICE, THE, is in Somerset House. The transport service is under the control of the Navy Office, and a branch for this service, of which Thomas Harding, Esq., is Secretary; there are also an establishment of clerks, five resident agents, and twenty seven agents afloat.

TRAVELLERS’ SOCIETY, THE, is held at No. 49, Pall Mall, S. W. Singer, Esq., Secretary.

TREASURER FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX OFFICE, THE, is in Staples Inn.

TREASURY REMEMBRANCER’S OFFICE, THE, is in Somerset Place.

TREASURY OFFICE, THE, or CHAMBERS, is at Whitehall, a new handsome building by Mr. Soane, on the west side opposite Privy Gardens. The Treasury is under the government of the First Lord of the Treasury, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and three other Commissioners, called the Lords of the Treasu�???ry; Joseph Plants, Esq., and George R. Dawson, Esq., Secretaries; the Hon. James Stewart, Assistant Secretary, with a suitable establishment of clerks.

TRIG LANE, Upper Thames Street, is about a quarter of a mile on the right hand side, going from Blackfriars’ Bridge.

TRIG STAIRS, Upper Thames Street, are near the preceding.

TRINITY ALMS HOUSES, THE, or HOSPITAL, are on the north side of the Mile End Road, and were founded in 1695, by the corporation of the Trinity House, upon a piece of ground given them by Captain Henry Mudd, one of the elder brethren. They consist of twenty eight tenements, for as many decayed commanders of ships, mates, or pilots and their wives or widows. The building forms three sides of a handsome quadrangle, and consists of a centre and two wings. In the middle of the area between the wings is a statue of Captain Saunders who died in 1721, and bequeathed a handsome estate to the charity, which is under the control and management of the corporation. – [see Trinity House]

TRINITY COURT. – 1. is in Aldersgate Street, opposite Falcon Square. – 2. is near the middle of the east side of Little Trinity Lane, Upper Thames Street.

TRINITY CHAPEL, Conduit Street, Hanover Square, is a small neat building on the south side of the street, near New Bond Street. It was originally a wooden field chapel, erected by James II., and went upon wheels, for the purpose of being conveyed wherever his majesty went, it being fitted up for his private masses. In 1686, it was in his camp at Hounslow Heath, where it remained until some time after the revolution, when it was removed to its present site. Here it remained and was used as a chapel by the neighbouring inhabitants until 1716, when it was demolished and the present building erected in its stead.

TRINITY HOSPITALS, Deptford, are two charitable institutions belonging to the corporation of the Trinity House, one of which was erected in the reign of Henry VIII., and is commonly called the Trinity House of Deptford Strond. This Old Hospital, as it was called, is known to the the public by an engraving published by Gribelin, in 1701, and consisted of twenty one apartments; but being taken down in 1788, it was rebuilt and the number increased to twenty five. It stands near the Church of St. Nicholas.

The other is in Church Street, and is called Trinity Hospital. It was built about the end of the seventeenth century, and contains fifty six apartments. In the centre of the quadrangle, before the building, is a statue of Captain William Maples, who, in 1680, gave £1,300. towards the building. Sir Robert Browne gave the ground in 1672, and several other liberal benefactors contributed to its support.

At this place, the brethren of the Trinity House meet yearly on Trinity Monday, to choose a master, according to ancient custom, and afterwards go to the Church of St. Nicholas to hear divine service.

These hospitals are also under the management of the corporation. – [see Trinity House]

TRINITY HOUSE, THE CORPORATION OF, is a society founded, in 1512, by Sir Thomas Spert, commander of the great ship, Henry Grace de Dieu, and Comptroller of the Navy to King Henry VIII. It was incorporated on the 20th of May, 1515, for the better regulation of seamen, and the convenience of ships and mariners on our coast; when the ancient rights and privileges of the company of mariners of England, and their several possessions at Deptford, was confirmed, to them. These, together with several grants of Queen Elizabeth and Charles II., were afterwards confirmed by �???letters patent of James II., dated the 8th of July, 1685, by the name of “The Master, Wardens and Assistants of the Guild or Fraternity of the most glorious and undivided Trinity, and of St. Clement’s in the Parish of Deptford Strond, in the County of Kent.”

The corporation and court of assistants are invested with the following powers. – 1. The examining of the mathematical children of Christ’s Hospital. – 2. Examining the masters of his Majesty’s ships, appointing pilots and punishing them for negligence. – 3. Settling the rates of pilotage, erecting, ordering and maintaining light houses, buoys, beacons and other sea marks, upon the several coasts of the Kingdom. – 4. Preventing aliens from serving on board of English ships without their license. – 5. Punishing seamen for desertion or mutiny in the merchants’ service. – 6. Hearing and determining complaints of officers and seamen in the merchants’ service. – 7. Granting licenses to poor seamen (non-freemen) to row on the river Thames for their support, and sundry other similar privileges.

To this company belongs the ballast department for clearing, and deepening the Thames, and supplying vessels with the ballast that they heave in such service. Its revenues arise from tonnage, ballastage, beaconage, &c., and from sundry benefactions which are applied after defraying their necessary expenses, towards the relief of decayed seamen, their widows and orphans, of whom they relieve a large number by pensions; in addition to the before-mentioned alms houses and hospitals. – [see Trinity Alms Houses and Trinity Hospitals]

They have also a veto on the moorings, which are determined on, first by the harbour-masters and the surveyor of the Port of London, who makes triplicate drawings of the proposed new moorings, one for the Trinity corporation, one for the harbour-masters and one for himself, which after receiving the approbation of the Board and of the Navigation Committee, under whom they act, the altered or new moorings become legal. – [see Harbour Masters]

The present officers of the corporation are, the King, Master; Captain John Woolmore, Deputy Master; thirty Elder Brethren; an unlimited number of Younger Brethren, who must be masters of ships at the time of their election; Jacob Herbert, Esq., Secretary; eight Clerks; three Clerks of the Ballast Office; two Clerks of the Sea Departments; two Clerks Coastwise; and Mr. Cotton, Collector of Duties, in the Port of London.

TRINITY HOUSE, THE, is on the north side of Trinity Square, Tower Hill, between Cooper’s Row and Savage Gardens, and is the office of the above named corporation. It is a handsome stone fronted building, consisting of a main body and two wings. The principal story is of the Ionic order, raised upon a rusticated ground story. Above the windows are some beautifully sculptured medallions of portraits of George III. and his Queen Charlotte, genii with nautical instruments, and representations of the four principal light houses on the coast. The court room contains portraits of George III. and his Queen, King James II., Lord Sandwich, Lord Howe, Mr. Pitt and other elder brethren and benefactors.

It was built from the designs and under the superintendence of the late Samuel Wyatt, Esq. The first stone was laid September 12, 1793, and the offices opened for business in 1795.

TRINITY LANE, GREAT, Bread Street, Cheapside, is the third turning on the left hand side of that street, going from Cheapside.

TRINITY LANE, LITTLE, Upper Thames Street, extends from the middle of Great Trinity Lane into Thames Street.

TRINITY THE LESS, the Church �???of, was situated, before the fire of London, at the north east corner of Little Trinity Lane, where a German chapel now stands. It received the epithet “the Less,” to distinguish it from the Trinity priory at Aldgate; but having been destroyed by the great fire of 1666, the parish was united to that of St. Michael, Queenhithe, and the church was not rebuilt. – [see St. Michael, Queenhithe]

TRINITY, Minories, the Church of, is situated in the Little Minories. It stands on part of the ancient convent of the nuns of St. Clare, called the Minoresses, that was founded in 1239, by Edmund Earl of Lancaster, brother of Edward I. This being suppressed, in 1539, a number of houses were erected on its site, and a small church was built for the inhabitants, and dedicated to the Holy Trinity, whence it derived its name, and its addition from its situation. This church was rebuilt in a plain substantial manner, in 1708, and is the family burial place of the Legges, Earls of Dartmouth, to one of whose ancestors, a house called the king’s, was granted by Charles II.

The curate of this parish, for it is neither a rectory nor vicarage, holds the living by an instrument of donation under the great seal of England. It is in the city, diocese and archdeaconry of London, and the present curate is the Rev. Henry Fly, D.D., Sub-dean of St. Paul’s, Vicar of Willesden and Perpetual Curate of Kingsbury with Twyford, who was instituted by the Lord Chancellor, in 1826.

TRINITY PLACE, Charing Cross, is about six houses on the left hand side of the way, going from the Strand.

TRINITY SQUARE, Tower Hill, is that part of Great Tower Hill that faces the Trinity, and has the enclosed plantation in the centre.

TRINITY STREET, Rotherhithe, is the continuation of Lower Queen Street; it leads to Russell Street and Greenland Dock.

TRIPE YARD, Whitechapel, is a few houses on the right hand side of Middlesex Street, going from Aldgate High Street.

TROTMAN’S SCHOOL, Bunhill Row, was founded by the Haberdashers’ Company, in pursuance of the will of Mr. Throckmorton Trotman, dated October 30, 1663, who bequeathed £2,400 to that Company for ever, towards erecting and maintaining this school. The school was formerly much neglected, but the Parliamentary Commissioners, in their Report, say, that since their First Report, the aged schoolmaster who then presided over it had died, and that under his successor, the present master, the school was acquiring a greater degree of efficiency. – [see Haberdashers’ School]

TROTTER’S WAYS, Rotherhithe, are on the eastern side of Cherry Garden Stairs.

TRUMP COURT, Whitechapel Road, is a few houses on the left hand side, eastward of the church.

TRUMP STREET, King Street, Cheapside, is six houses on the left hand side, going from Cheapside; it leads into Lawrence Lane and Honey Lane Market.

TRUNDLEY’S LANE, Deptford Lower Road, is on the south side of the Halfway House.

TRUSS SOCIETY. – [see City of London Truss Society]

TUDOR STREET, Blackfriars, is the second turning on the left hand side of New Bridge Street, going from the Bridge towards Farringdon Street.

TUFTON STREET, Westminster, is the third turning on the left hand side of Wood Street, going from Millbank Street.

TURK’S HEAD COURT. – 1. is in Turnmill Street, Clerkenwell, about the middle of �???the east side. – 2. is in Golden Lane, Barbican, the continuation of Bell Alley.

TURK’S ROW, Chelsea, is the first turning northward of and parallel to Royal Hospital Row.

TURK STREET, Bethnal Green, is the continuation of Tyssen Street.

TURN AGAIN LANE, Farringdon Street, is at the north end of that street, and leads into Snow Hill.

TURNERS BUILDINGS, Poplar, are about a furlong on the left hand side, going from the Commercial Road.

TURNER’S COURT. – 1. is in St. Martin’s Lane, Charing Cross, about eight houses northward of Chandos Street. – 2. is in Church Lane, Whitechapel, the first turning on the right hand side, going from the Commercial Road.

TURNER’S RENTS, Southwark, is opposite George Street, in Gravel Lane, going from Blackfriars’ Road.

TURNER SQUARE. – 1. is in Whitechapel Road, about a quarter of a mile east of the church. – 2. is in Hoxton, about the third of a mile on the left hand side, going from Old Street.

TURNER STREET, Rosemary Lane, is about ten houses on the left hand. side of Cartwright Street, in that lane.

TURNHAM PLACE, Shoreditch, is in the Curtain Road, nearly a furlong from Old Street Road.

TURNMILL STREET, Clerkenwell, is the continuation of Cow Cross Street, and is so called from the mills that were anciently erected in it, that were turned by a stream of water from Hampstead and Highgate.

TURNSTILE, GREAT, High Holborn, is nearly a quarter of a mile on the left hand side, going from Farringdon Street.

TURNSTILE, LITTLE, High Holborn, is about a quarter of a mile on the right hand side of the street, going from Broad Street, Bloomsbury.

TURNSTILE, NEW, High Holborn, is eight doors westward of the preceding.

TURNSTILE, Great Saffron Hill, is a few houses on the left hand side, going from Field Lane.

TURNWHEEL LANE, Cannon Street, is the first turning on the right hand going from Walbrook; it leads on to Dowgate Hill.

TURVILLE STREET, Bethnal Green, is the fourth turning on the left hand side of Church Street, going from Shoreditch.

TUSON’S BUILDINGS, Whitechapel, is the continuation of Barn’s Buildings, in Castle Lane.

TWEEZER’S ALLEY, Strand, is a few houses on the left hand side of Water Street, going from Arundel Street.

TWISDEN BUILDINGS, Temple, is at the bottom of Inner Temple Lane.

TWISTER’S ALLEY, Bunhill Row, is about the middle of the west side.

TYER’S GATEWAY, Bermondsey Street, is about ten houses on the left hand side, going from Russell Street.

TYLER’S COURT. – 1. is in Lambeth Hill, Upper Thames Street, three houses on the left hand going from Old Fish Street. – 2. is in Wardour Street, Soho, six houses northward of Peter Street. – 3. is in Carnaby Market, at the north west corner, and leads into Carnaby Street.

TYLER’S PASSAGE, Carnaby Market, is five houses on the left hand side of King Street, going from Oxford Street.

TYLER’S STREET, Carnaby Market, is t�???he third Street on the left hand side of King Street, going from Oxford Street.

TYPE COURT, Finsbury, is the second turning on the right hand side of Type Street, going from Chiswell Street.

TYPE STREET, Finsbury, is the second turning on the left hand side of Chiswell Street, going from Barbican.

TYRELL STREET, Bethnal Green Road, is at the north east corner of Thorold Square.

TYSSEN PLACE, Kingsland Road, is about the third of a mile from Shoreditch Church.

TYSSEN STREET, Bethnal Green, is about a quarter of a mile on the left hand side of Church Street, going from Shoreditch.

TYSSEN’S YARD, Tooley Street, is opposite Mill Lane.

U

ULSTER PLACE, Regent’s Park, is on the north side of the New Road, beginning at the western side of Park Square.

ULSTER TERRACE, Regent’s Park, is at the north west corner of Park Square, exactly parallel to the preceding.

UNICORN COURT, Southwark, is about ten houses on the right hand side of Kent Street, going from St. George’s Church.

UNICORN PASSAGE, Tooley Street, is the third turning on the left hand side of Vine Yard, going from Tooley Street.

UNICORN YARD, Oxford Street, is about five houses westward of John Street.

UNICORN or UNION YARD, Tooley Street, is five doors eastward of Stoney Lane.

UNION BUILDINGS. – 1. are in Leather Lane, Holborn, seven doors south of Portpool Lane. – 2. are in Union Street, Hackney Road, the first turning on the right hand from the road. – 3. are in Three Oak Lane, Horselydown, facing the eastern end of Free School Street. – 4. are in the Kent Road, about the fifth of a mile on the right hand side going from the Elephant and Castle.

UNION COURT. – 1. is in Brunswick Road, Westminster, the first turning on the left hand from Bridewell. – 2. is in Holborn Hill, nearly opposite St. Andrew’s Church. – 3. UPPER, is the continuation of the last described. – 4. is in Union Street, Middlesex Hospital, five houses on the right hand side going from Norfolk Street. – 5. is in Old Broad Street, the second turning on the left hand in Wormwood Street. – 6. is in Willow Street, Paul Street, Finsbury Square, the second turning on the left hand. – 7. is in the Hackney Road, a few houses from Shoreditch Church. – 8. is in Green Dragon Alley, Wapping, at the northern end. – 9. is in Kent Street, Southwark, about twenty houses on the right hand side. – 10. is in Blackman Street, about forty two houses on the left, hand side going from St. George’s Church. – 11. is in the Maze, Southwark, about six houses on the left hand side going from Tooley Street. – 12. is in Gibraltar Row, St. George’s Fields, the first turning on the right hand from Prospect Place. – 13. is in Tooley Street, four houses westward of Bermondsey Street. – 14. is in Rotherhithe, on the south side of the church by the Charity School. – 15. is in Union Street, Southwark.

UNION CRESCENT. – 1. is in the Hackney Road, about the middle of the north side of Union Street. – 2. is in the Kent road, about half a mile on the left hand side going from the Elephant and Castle.

UNION ASSURANCE OFFICE FOR FIRE AND LIFE, THE, Cornhill, at the corner of Finch Lane, and in Baker Street, Portman S�??quare, is an old established company, instituted in 1714. Its present officers are Joseph Wilson, Esq., Chairman; Broom P. Witts, Esq., Deputy Chairman; thirteen other Directors; Thomas Lewis, Esq., Secretary; David Botterill, Esq., Accountant; Joseph Parkinson, Esq., Surveyor of Buildings.

UNION PLACE. – 1. is in Orchard Street, Westminster, nearly opposite New Tothill Street. – 2. is in Castle Lane, Westminster, the first turning on the right hand side, going from James Street. – 3. is in Alsop’s Buildings, New Road, Mary-le-bone, about a furlong eastward of Baker Street, North. – 4. is in the Curtain Road, a few yards northward of Bateman’s Row. – 5. is on Stepney Green, the second turning on the right hand from Mile End Road. – 6. is in Lambeth, the west continuation of Lambeth Terrace. – 7. LITTLE or COURT, is in Lambeth, about the middle of the preceding. – 8. is in Edward Street, Blackfriars’ Road. – 9. is in Swan Lane, Rotherhithe, the first turning on the right hand side going from Rotherhithe Street. – 10. is in the Back Hill, Coldbath Fields, the first turning on the left hand going from Bay Street. – 11. is in Blackman Street, Southwark, opposite the King’s Bench Prison. – 12. is in the New Road, Mary-le-bone.

UNION ROW. – 1. is in George Street, Chelsea, a few yards on the left hand side going from the south east corner of Sloane Square. – 2. is in the City Road, the west continuation of Fountain Place. – 3. is in Stepney Green, the first turning on the right hand side of Union Place from the green. – 4. is in Bethnal Green Road, the continuation of the west side of Wilmot Street. – 5. is in Fashion Street, Spitalfields, a few houses on the right hand side, going from Brick Lane. – 6. is in White Bear Gardens, Hackney Road. – 7. is in Union Street, Whitechapel Road, facing Sion Chapel. – 8. is in the Minories, and extends from Rosemary Lane to Little Hill Street. – 9. is in the Kent Road, near a quarter of a mile from the Elephant and Castle. – 10. is in Snow’s Fields, Bermondsey, the fourth turning on the left hand side going from Bermondsey Street. – 11. is in Wapping Street, about the sixth of a mile below Hermitage Bridge.

UNION STREET. – 1. is in New Bond Street. – 2. is in Hill Street, Berkeley Square. – 3. is in New Bridge Street, Blackfriars. – 4. is in Bishopsgate Street Without. – 6. is in Whitechapel Road. – 6. is in Shadwell High Street. – 7. is in London Road, St. George’s Fields. – 8. is in Lambeth. – 9. is in Tower Street, St. George’s Fields. – 10. is in Dover Street, Blackfriars’ Road. – 11. is in High Street, Southwark. – 12. is in Somers Town. – 13. is in Cornwall Street, St. George’s in the East. – 14. is in Bethnal Green Road.

UNION WALK, Hackney Road, is the first turning on the left hand side of the Union Street, going from Kingsland Road.

UNION YARD, Tooley Street. – [see Unicorn Yard]

UNIVERSITY STREET, Bedford Square, is the street that was formerly called Carmarthen Street, Tottenham Court Road. It derives its new name from its contiguity to the London University.

UNIVERSITY CLUB HOUSE, THE, is a very elegant building, designed by Messrs. Wilkins and Bering, for an association of a club of members of the two English Universities. C. Steward, Esq., Secretary.

UNIVERSITY LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY, THE, is at No. 27, Suffolk Street, Pall Mall. It was founded among the members of the preceding Institution. The Archbishop of Canterbury, President; eighteen Directors; G. D. Yeats, M.D., R. Williams, M.D., and T. Watson, M.D., Physicians; Rev. J. W. Hughes, Oxford, H. Gunning, Esq., Cambridge, Corres�À?ponding Directors.

UPPER GROUND, Blackfriars’ Road, is the first turning on the left hand side over the bridge.

UPPER GROUND STREET, Blackfriars’ Road, is the first turning on the right hand side over the bridge.

UPPER TURNING, Shadwell, is the first street on the left hand side of Shakspeare’s Walk.

USEFUL KNOWLEDGE, SOCIETY FOR DIFFUSING, THE, is held at No. 4, South Square, Gray’s Inn Lane. It was established in 1827 for the laudable purpose enumerated in its title. The society has been eminently successful, and has published some very useful treatises. The reformation in the almanacks consequent on the publication of “The British Almanck,” by them has been of great public utility. It is under the management of a committee, of which the Right Hon. Lord Brougham and Vaux, Lord High Chancellor of England is Chairman; Lord John Russell, M.P., Vice Chairman; William Tooke, Esq., F.R.S., Treasurer, and Mr. Thomas Coates, No. 4, South Square, Gray’s Inn, Secretary.

V

VACCINATION HOSPITAL FOR CASUAL SMALL POX, Pancras Road, Gray’s Inn Lane 1746. – [see Battle Bridge]

VAIN STREET, Tooley Street, it the first turning on the left hand side of Tooley Street.

VALENTINE PLACE, Blackfriars’ Road, forms part of the west side of the road opposite Bennet’s Row.

VALENTINE ROW, Blackfriars’ Road, is at the south end of the preceding, and leads to Webber Street.

VALENTINE ROW, Bermondsey, is in Long Lane, near Pump Court.

VALIANT SOLDIER’S ALLEY, Bermondsey Street, is on the left hand side going from Tooley Street.

VAUXHALL, is a hamlet in the parish of Lambeth, at the west end of Upper Kennington Lane, by the turnpike. It is celebrated for its gardens, where concerts, and other amusements, suppers, &c. are given in the open air.

VAUXHALL BRIDGE, crosses the Thames, a little to the westward of Vauxhall Gardens, to a newly formed road, from the Thames to Pimlico. It was originally designed by Mr. Dodd, and the first act of parliament was obtained in 1809. The bridge was began by Mr. Rennie, and the first stone was laid by Lord Dundas, as proxy for H.R.H. the Prince Regent, on the 9th of May, 1811. This was intended to have been entirely of stone, with nine arches, but the directors finding the expense to exceed their means, applied for another act in 1812, empowering them to use iron or any other material.

The works were then commenced under the directions of James Walker, Esq., F.S.A., and the first stone was laid by the late Duke of Brunswick, on the 21st of Aug. 1813, and on the 4th of June, 1816, it was opened to the public.

The width of the river at this bridge is 900 feet, and the bridge consists of nine arches, of 78 feet span, and eight piers, each of which is 13 feet wide. The length of the bridge, clear of the abutments, is 806 feet, and the height of the centre arch is 27 feet above high water. A well engraved view of this bridge, from a drawing by Mr. T. H. Shepherd, is given in my work of London in the Nineteenth Century.

VAUXHALL PLACE, South Lambeth is the first row on the left hand side going from the turnpike.

VAUXHALL ROW, Vauxhall is the continuation of Princes Street, Lambeth.

VAUXHALL SQUARE, Vauxhall, is about a furlong on the left hand side, going from Vauxhall Turnpike.

VAUXHALL TERRACE, Vauxhall, is part of the west side of Vauxhall Walk.

VAUXHALL WALK, Lambeth, is nearly opposite Lambeth Walk.

St. VEDAST, FOSTER, the Church of, is situated on the east side of Foster Lane, Cheapside, It is dedicated to St. Vedast, Bishop of Arras, and is mentioned as early as 1308. The patronage was anciently in the Prior and Convent of Canterbury, till 1352, when it was transferred to the Archbishop of that see, in whom it has remained ever since. The old church was destroyed by the great fire of 1666, and the present edifice erected in 1697, by Sir Christopher Wren, when the parish of St. Michael-le-Quern [see that church] was united to it by act of parliament.

The patronage of the latter is in the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul’s, who present alternately with the Archbishop. It is one of the peculiars of the Archbishop, and is therefore in the province of Canterbury, and exempt from archidiaconal visitations. The present rector is the Rev. J. T. Walmsley, D.D., Rector of Hanwell, who was instituted by the Archbishop in 1815.

VERE STREET, Oxford Street, is opposite New Bond Street.

VERE STREET, Clare Market, is the second turning on the right hand side of the Market.

VERNON’S BUILDINGS, St. Pancras, are near the north east corner of the Small Pox Hospital.

VERNON PLACE, Bloomsbury, is at the north east corner of the square.

VERULAM BUILDINGS, Gray’s Inn Lane are opposite Portpool Lane.

VETERINARY COLLEGE, THE, ROYAL, is a large handsome building, at Camden Town, St. Pancras, established in 1791, for studying the Diseases of Horses and other Cattle. Its principal officers are, E. Coleman, Esq., Professor; W. J. T. Merton, Dispenser.

VICAR GENERAL’S AND REGISTER OF THE PECULIARS OF THE DEANERIES OF THE ARCHES, LONDON, SHOREHAM AND CROYDON, THE OFFICE OF, is in Doctors’ Commons, the first house on the left hand side of Bell Yard, going from Great Carter Lane. The hours of attendance are from 9 to 8, and it is under the government of James Henry Arnold, D.C.L., Vicar General; the Right Hon. Sir John Nicholl, M.P., Dean of the Peculiars; John Moore, Esq., Registrar; Charles Bedford, Deputy; George Marshall, Apparitor General of the Province of Canterbury.

VICE CHANCELLOR’S COURT, THE, is in Lincoln’s Inn Old Square, the Rt. Hon. Sir Launcelot Shadwell, Vice Chancellor,

VICTUALLING OFFICE, THE, is in Somerset Place, and is under the management of commissioners, clerks and officers. The principal of which are, the Hon. G. A. C. Stapylton, Chairman; Capt. Isaac Wolley, R.N., Deputy; and four other Commissioners; M. W. Clifden, Esq., Secretary.

There are also departments at Deptford, of which Captain John Hill, R.N., is Commissioner; Portsmouth, Captain Henry Garrett, K.C.B., R.N., Resident Commissioner; Plymouth, Captain Sir James A. Gordon, R.N., Resident Commissioner; and various agent victuallers abroad.

VICTUALLING OFFICE ROW, Deptford, is about the third of a mile on the left hand side above the Commercial Dock.

VIGO LANE, Regent Street, is the first turning on the left hand from Piccadilly.

VILLIER’S COURT, Piccadilly, is a turning on the �??south side that leads into St. James’s Street.

VILLIER’S STREET, Strand, is the fourth street on the right hand side, going from Charing Cross.

VINCENT’S COURT, Falcon Square, is two houses in Silver Street, from Wood Street.

VINCENT ROW, City Road, is a part of the left hand side.

VINCENT SQUARE, Westminster, is a new Square, named after Dr. Vincent, a late Dean of Westminster, and Master of Westminster School, in Regent Street, Vauxhall Bridge Road, near the play ground of the Westminster schoolboys.

VINCENT STREET, Bethnal Green, is behind Shoreditch Church.

VINCENT STREET, Westminster, is in the Vauxhall Bridge Road, near Vincent Square.

VINE COURT. – 1. is in Golden Lane, Barbican. – 2. is in Vineyard Gardens, Clerkenwell. – 3. is in Moor Lane, Finsbury. – 4. is in Vine Street, Spitalfields. – 5. is in Vine Street, Minories. – 6. is in Broad Street, Ratcliffe. – 7. is in Whitechapel Road. – 8. is in Vine Street, Lambeth. – 9. is in Blackman Street, Southwark. – 10. is in Tooley Street, Southwark.

VINE PASSAGE, Ratcliffe, is about the middle of the north side of Broad Street.

VINE PLACE, Spitalfields, is in Vine Street, near Little Pearl Street.

VINE STREET. – 1. is in Westminster. – 2. is in Regent Street. – 3. is in Piccadilly. – 4. is in Chandos Street, Covent Garden. – 5. is in Broad Street, Bloomsbury. – 6. is in Leather Lane, Holborn. – 7. is in Hatton Wall. – 8. is in Lamb Street, Spitalfields. – 9. is in Phoenix Street, Spitalfields. – 10. is in the Minories. – 11. is in Narrow Wall, Lambeth.

VINE YARD. – 1. is in Drury Lane. – 2. is in Tooley Street.

VINE YARD GARDENS, Clerkenwell, is the second turning on the left hand side of Bowling Green Lane, going from opposite the workhouse in Coppice Row.

VINE YARD WALK, Clerkenwell, is about ten houses on the left hand side of Coppice Row.

VINEGAR LANE, St. George’s in the East, leads from Sun Tavern Fields to White Horse Place, Commercial Road.

VINEGAR YARD. – 1. is in Red Lion Street, Clerkenwell. – 2. is in Darby Street, Rosemary Lane. – 3. is in Cannon Street, Mint. – 4. is in Bermondsey Street. – 5. is in Broad Street, Bloomsbury.

VINTNERS’ ALMS HOUSES, Mile End Road, are opposite Mutton Lane, and were erected after the fire of London, in lieu of those which were then destroyed in Upper Thames Street, near Garlick Hill. They were originally founded by Guy Shuldham in 1446, but have been much added to by the company.

VINTNERS’ HALL, Upper Thames Street, is on the south side of that street, near Queen Street Place and the Southwark Bridge, on the site of an ancient mansion of Sir John Stody, Lord Mayor in 1357, who gave it to the company. It was then called the Manor of the Vintry; but being destroyed by the great fire of 1666, the present hall was rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren. In the court room are whole length portraits of Charles II., James II. and his Queen, George Prince of Denmark and Sir Thomas Rawlinson, Lord Mayor in 1706, and a painting, by Vandyke, of St. Martin, (the tutelary saint of the company) dividing his cloak with the beggar.

The Vintner’s is the eleventh of the twelve principal livery compan�??ies of the city, and was called “The Merchant Wine-tunners of Gascoign,” and was composed of the Vintinarii, who were the importers and the Tabernarii, who were the retailers of wine. They were incorporated in 1437 by letters patent of Henry VI., by the name of “The Master, Wardens and Freemen, and Commonalty of the Mystery of Vintners of the City of London.” A coat of arms was granted them in 1442, by Clarencieux King at Arms. The freemen, or free Vintners, as they are called, of this Company have the privilege of retailing wine without a license.

The company has large possessions, and are trustees for many charities, the details of which are fully detailed in the published Reports of the Parliamentary Commissioners on the Endowed Charities of the City of London.

VINTRY, THE WARD OF, derives its name from a district called the Vintry, a part of the north bank of the Thames, where Vintner’s hall and Queen Street Place are now built. It was situated at the south end of Three Cranes’ Lane, so called, from the cranes with which the wine was landed, and was such a magnificent building that Henry Picard, who was Lord Mayor in 1356, entertained therein the Kings of England, Scotland, France, and Cyprus, with a sumptuous feast in 1363.

Vintry Ward is bounded on the north by Cordwainers’ Ward; on the east by those of Walbrook and Dowgate; on the south by the river Thames, and on the west by Queenhithe Ward. Its principal Streets, are part of Upper Thames Street, College Hill, College Street, Great and Little, part of Queen Street, Great and Little St. Thomas Apostle, and Garlick Hill; and the most remarkable buildings are the parish churches of St. Michael Royal, and St. Martin Vintry, and St. James, Garlickhithe; and the hall of the Vintners, Cutlers, and Plumbers. – [see those several places and buildings]

It is divided into nine municipal precincts, and is governed by an alderman; (Henry Winchester, Esq., M.P.) a deputy, and eight other common councilmen, and the other usual ward officers.

VIRGINIA STREET, Upper East Smithfield, is in Parson’s Street, near Ratcliffe Highway.

VIRGINIA STREET, Bethnal Green, is the continuation of Castle Street, behind Shoreditch Church.

VOTE OFFICE, THE, OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS, is in Palace Yard, Westminster.

W

WADES PLACE, Mile End Road, is nearly opposite Bancroft’s Alms Houses.

WADHAM’S COURT, Dock Head, is the last turning on the left hand side of Jacob Street, going from Mill Street.

WAGSTAFF’S BUILDINGS, Southwark, are at the north end of Great Guildford Street, adjoining Maid Lane.

WAKEFIELD’S PLACE, Bunhill Row, is the first turning on the right hand side going from Old Street.

WALBROOK, is a street on the west side of the Mansion House, and extends from Charlotte Row to Cannon Street, and Dowgate Hill. It derives its name from an ancient rivulet, called Wall Brook, on account of its entering the city through the wall between Bishopsgate and Moorgate, which after many turnings, ran down this street and emptied itself into the Thames, near Dowgate. It is now covered over, and used as a common sewer.

WALBROOK CHURCH. – [see St. Stephen, Walbrook]

WALBROOK PLACE, Hoxton, is about a quarter of a mile on the left hand side going from Winkworth’s Buildings, City Road. I�?t receives its name as being built on the bank of the above named Walbrook.

WALBROOK WARD, derives its name from the before named Street, and is bounded on the east by Langbourn and Candlewick Wards, on the north by Cheap Ward, on the west by Cordwainer’s Ward, and on the south by Dowgate Ward. Its principal avenues are Walbrook, Bucklersbury, Budge Row, Dowgate Hill, Cannon Street, Bearbinder Lane, St. Swithin’s Lane, and a part of Lombard Street. The most distinguished buildings are the Mansion House of the Lord Mayor, the parish churches of St. Stephen, Walbrook, St. Swithin’s, Salters Hall, and London Stone. – [see those several articles]

It is divided into eight municipal precincts, and is governed by an Alderman, (John Atkins, Esq., M.P.) a deputy and seven other common councilmen, and the usual other ward officers.

WALBURGE STREET, St. George’s in the East, is the first turning in Upper Chapman Street.

WALCOT PLACE, Lambeth, is part of both sides of the High Road, and leads from Westminster Bridge to Kennington.

WALKER’S COURT, Oxford Street, the south continuation of Berwick Street to Little Pulteney Street.

WALLER PLACE, St. George’s Fields, is nearly opposite the Blind School, in the Lambeth Road.

WALLIS’S COURT, Southwark, is the first turning on the left hand side of Mint Street, going from opposite St. George’s Church.

WALLIS’S YARD, Shoreditch, is the second turning on the left hand side of Worship Street, going from Shoreditch.

WALNUT TREE COURT, Globe Alley, Limehouse, is the third turning on the left hand side of Nightingale Lane, going from Fore Street.

WALNUT TREE WALK, Lambeth, is in Walcot Place, nearly a quarter of a mile from the Three Stags.

WALTON’S COURT, Rosemary Lane, is the third turning on the right hand side of Cartwright Street, going from Rosemary Lane.

WALTON PLACE, Blackfriars’ Road, is part of the western side of the road adjoining the circus.

WAPPING CHARITY SCHOOL, adjoins the south side of the church.

WAPPING DOCK STAIRS, is at Wapping Street, near Old Gravel Lane.

WAPPING DOCK STREET, is opposite the preceding.

WAPPING NEW STAIRS, are opposite King Stairs, Rotherhithe.

WAPPING OLD STAIRS, are in Wapping Street, on the western side of the church.

WAPPING STREET, is parallel to the Thames.

WAPPING WALL, is the continuation of the preceding.

WAR OFFICE, THE, is at the Horse Guards, Whitehall, the first door on the right hand side from St. James’s Park. It is under the management of the Secretary of War, a deputy secretary, a board, and a large establishment of clerks, storekeepers and other officers.

WARDS, THE, various, of the City, are certain ancient districts into which the City and its liberties are divided, each being under the government of an alderman and his deputy, and is represented in the Court of Common Council, by as many common councilmen as there are precincts in each ward. – [see the several wards by name, as Aldersgate, Aldgate, Bassishaw, &c.]

W�??ARD’S COURT, Goswell Street, is opposite Wilderness Row.

WARD’S ROW, Pimlico, is about ten houses from Buckingham Palace.

WARD’S ROW, Bethnal Green Road, is part of the left hand side of the road.

WARDEN’S COURT, Clerkenwell Close, is the first turning on the left hand side, going from Clerkenwell Green.

WARDOUR STREET, Oxford Street, is the fourth turning on the left hand side, going from St. Giles’s.

WARDOUR MEWS, Portland Street, is about three houses westward of Wardour Street.

WARDOUR STREET, Soho, is the fourth turning on the left hand side of Oxford Street, going from St. Giles’s Church.

WARDROBE PLACE, Doctors’ Commons, is two or three houses on the right hand side of Great Carter Lane, going from Creed Lane. It derives its name from the King’s Wardrobe being formerly in the neighbourhood. – [see St. Andrew near the Wardrobe]

WARDROBE TERRACE, Doctors’ Commons, is the first turning on the right hand side of St. Andrew’s Hill, from Upper Thames Street.

WARNER STREET, LITTLE, Coldbath Fields, is the continuation of Ray Street.

WARNER STREET, GREAT, Coldbath Fields, is the continuation of the preceding into Bayne’s Row.

WARNFORD COURT, Throgmorton Street, is the third turning on the left hand side, going from the north east corner of the Bank of England.

WARREN ROW, Hoxton, is on the northern side of Turner’s Square.

WARREN SQUARE, (Sir William’s), Wapping Street, is about eighteen houses westward of New Gravel Lane.

WARREN STREET, Fitzroy Square, is on the north side of the square.

WARRANT OF ATTORNEY’S OFFICE, No. 3, Pump Court, Middle Temple, is the first turning on the left hand in Middle Temple Lane.

WARWICK COURT, High Holborn, is about forty houses on the right hand side, westward of Gray’s Inn Lane.

WARWICK COURT, Newgate Street, is on the west side of Warwick Lane.

WARWICK LANE, Newgate Street, is the first turning on the right hand side, going from Snow Hill it extends from Newgate Street to the end of Paternoster Row, near Amen Corner, and obtained its name from there being anciently here, the city mansion of the Earls of Warwick.

WARWICK PLACE, Bedford Row, is at the north end of Brownlow Street, Holborn.

WARWICK ROW, Blackfriars’ Road, is about half a mile from the bridge.

WARWICK STREET, Golden Square, extends from Glasshouse Street to Beak Street.

WARWICK STREET, Cockspur Street, is about ten houses on the right hand from Pall Mall.

WATER’S COURT, Southwark, is on the west side of Stoney Street.

WATER BANK. – 1. is in Fleet Street, the third tuning on the left hand from Farringdon Street. – 2. is in Blackfriars, the first turning on the left hand in Earl Street. – 3. is in Great Tower Street, opposite Mark Lane. – 4. is in Jacob Street, Dock Head, the first turning north to London Street.

WATER STREET, Strand, is in Arundel S�??treet, near the Crown and Anchor Tavern.

WATER STREET, Whitefriars, is the second turning parallel westward, to part of Bridge Street.

WATERLOO BRIDGE, is a substantial bridge, built over the Thames, from the Strand to Lambeth, a little westward of Somerset Place. M. Dupin, the celebrated French engineer, calls this bridge in his Memoir on the Public Works of England, “a colossal monument worthy of Sesostris and the Caesars.” It was erected by a joint stock company, under the superintendance of the late John Rennie, Esq., from the designs of Mr. George Dodd. The act for incorporating this company was passed in June 1809; in July 1813, they obtained a second act, and in 1816, a third act, by which the bridge is named “Waterloo,” in honour of that great and decisive victory.

This bridge consists of nine elliptical arches, with useless and inappropriate Grecian Doric columns between the piers, surmounted by the anomalous decoration of a balustrade upon a Doric entablature. The roadway upon the summit of the arches is level, in a line with the Strand, and is carried by a gentle declivity, upon a series of brick arches, over the roadway on the Surrey bank of the river, to the level of the roads near the Obelisk, by the Surrey Theatre.

The width of the river, in this part is 1326 feet, at high water, and is covered by nine elliptical arches of 120 feet span, and 35 feet high, supported on piers 20 feet wide, at the springing of the arches. The entire length of this bridge is 2456 feet, the bridge and abutments being 1380 feet, the approach from the Strand 310 feet, and the causeway, on the Surrey side, as far as supported by the land arches, 766 feet.

The first stone of this fine bridge was laid on the 11th of October, 1811, and it was opened on the anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo, June 18, 1817, by the Prince Regent, the Duke of Wellington, and other illustrious personages, and a grand military cavalcade, who all passed over it. An extremely well engraved view of this bridge, from a drawing by Mr. T. H. Shepherd, is given in my work of London in the Nineteenth Century, with more details than there is room for in this dictionary.

WATERLOO BRIDGE ROAD, Lambeth, is the new road from the southern end of Waterloo Bridge to the Obelisk, by the Surrey Theatre.

WATERLOO PLACE, Pall Mall, is the square at the southern extremity of Regent Street, opposite the site of Carlton Palace, which is now pulled down. It is from the designs of John Nash, Esq., and possesses the faults and beauties of that eminent architect.

WATERMANS’ HALL, St. Mary-at-Hill, formerly stood in Cold Harbour, and was removed to this spot, and the present neat hall erected, in 1786. It is a pretty design, of brick and stone, upon a rusticated ground story, with the arms of the Company, sculptured in stone, over the door.

The Watermen do not appear to have had any charter of incorporation before the reign of Philip and Mary, when they were established by an act of parliament, which enacts that out of the Watermen between Gravesend and Windsor, eight overseers or rulers are chosen by the Court of Aldermen of the City of London, to keep order among the rest. It is the ninety-first in the precedence of the City Companies.

WATERMAN’S ROW, St. George’s in the East, is at the north end of Upper Well Alley.

WATLING STREET, St. Paul’s Churchyard, extends from the Old Change to Budge Row. It derives its name from the Roman road of the same name, which ran through this street.

WATSON’S BUILDINGS. – 1. is in Ducking Pond Row, Whitechapel, the second turning on the left hand from North Street. – 2. is behind the Silver Lion, at Poplar.

WAX CHANDLERS’ HALL, is situated on the south side of Maiden Lane, Wood Street, Cheapside, and is a handsome modern brick building, well fitted up for the use of the Company. Over the centre window, on the north side, is the arms of the Company, and over the two end windows, a beehive, carved in stone.

The Wax Chandlers’ Company was incorporated, by letters patent, by Richard III. in 1483, by the name of “The Master, Wardens and Commonalty of the Art or Mystery of Wax Chandlers of London.” It is the twenty-ninth in precedence among the City Companies.

WEATHERHEAD’S GARDENS, Bethnal Green, are the second turning on the right hand side of Crabtree Row, going from the Hackney Road.

WEAVERS’ ALMS HOUSES, Hoxton, are at the corner of Old Street Road and the Curtain Road. They were erected chiefly at the expense of Mr. William Watson, citizen and weaver, for the Widows of twelve Poor Weavers. This Company have also other alms houses at Blossom Street, Norton Falgate, which are called Porter’s Fields Alms Houses, from the ancient name of the place whereon they stood.

WEAVERS’ HALL, is in Basinghall Street, about twenty houses on the right hand side of the street, going from Cateaton Street.

The Weavers’ Company is very ancient, and appears to be one of the first incorporated fraternities in the City of London. The Weavers were originally called “Thenarii,” and in the reign of Henry I. they paid £16 a year to the crown for their immunities. Their privileges were afterwards confirmed to them at Winchester, by letters patent of Henry II., which are still in the Company’s possession. The Company originally consisted of cloth and tapestry weavers, and by an act of the 7th of Henry IV., they were put under the management of the lord mayor and aldermen of the City.

WEAVERS’ LANE, Tooley Street, is the last turning on the left hand, going from London Bridge.

WEAVERS’ STREET, Bethnal Green, is the second turning on the right hand in Fleet Street Hill.

WEBB’S BUILDINGS, Spitalfields, is about twenty houses on the left hand side of St. John’s Street, going from Brick Lane.

WEBB STREET, Shoreditch, is about a quarter of a mile southward of the church.

WEBB STREET, Southwark, is the first turning on the right hand side of Bermondsey Street, going from Tooley Street

WEBB STREET, Bermondsey New Road, is the first turning on the left hand side, going from the Grange Road.

WEBBER ROW, St. George’s Fields, is the first turning on the left hand side, going from behind the Magdalen Hospital.

WEBBER STREET, Blackfriars’ Road, is the first turning on the left hand going from the Obelisk.

WEIGH HOUSE YARD, Botolph Lane, is the first turning on the left hand from Little Eastcheap. It derives its name from being the site of the King’s ancient weigh house.

WELBECK MEWS, Mary-le-bone, are about the middle of the north side of Little Welbeck Street.

WELBECK STREET, Mary-le-bone, is the second turning on the right hand side of Henrietta Street, going from Cavendish Square. It derives its name from having been built upon t�??he estate of the Earl of Oxford, the builder entitled it after his lordship’s seat, called Welbeck, in Hertfordshire.

WELBECK STREET, LITTLE, is the first turning on the right hand side of Welbeck Street, leading to Wigmore Street.

WELCH CHARITY SCHOOL, THE, is situated on the eastern side of Gray’s Inn Lane Road, and was erected in 1772. The society, however, was established in 1714, for educating, clothing, maintaining and apprenticing 100 boys, and 50 girls, children of indigent Welch parents, who are not entitled to parochial settlement. They first established themselves in Hatton Garden, afterwards in Clerkenwell and, lastly, as above. In 1769, they enlarged their establishment, and admitted girls for the first time. The present officers are, the King, Patron; Sir Watkin Williams Wynne, Bart., President; Prince Leopold and twenty-eight other distinguished personages, Vice Presidents; Lord Kenyon, Treasurer; Rev, Thomas Alban, Chaplain; Byam Denison, M.D., Physician; Titus Owen and Walter Griffith, Esqs., Surgeons; and Augustus Hayward, Esq., Secretary,

WELL ALLEY. – 1. UPPER, is in Wapping Street, about fifteen houses below the church. – 2. LOWER, is also in Wapping, the continuation of the last described. – 3. is in Ropemaker’s Fields, about the middle of the north side – 4. is in Tooley Street, behind No. 233, entering by Sherrard’s Court, near London Bridge.

WELL COURT. – 1. is in Queen Street, Cheapside – 2. is in the Minories – 3. is in Well Street, Wellclose Square. – 4. is in Glean Alley, Tooley Street. – 5. is in Russell Street, Bermondsey.

WELL’S MEWS, Oxford Street, are about sixteen houses on the right hand side of Wells Street, going from Oxford Street.

WELLS STREET, Oxford Street, is the sixth turning on the right hand side of the way going from St. Giles’s.

WELLS STREET, St. James’s, is opposite Eagle Street, from Piccadilly.

WELL STREET, Cripplegate, is about six houses on the left hand side of Jewin Street, from Redcross Street.

WELL YARD. – 1. is in Bainbridge Street, St. Giles’s – 2. is St. Bartholomew’s Hospital – 3. is in Lemon Street, Goodman’s Fields – 4. is in Rosemary Lane, near Tower Hill.

WELLCLOSE PLACE, St. George’s in the East, is about eleven houses on the left hand side of the New Road, going from Princes Square.

WELLCLOSE SQUARE, Ratcliffe Highway, is between Cable Street and Parson’s Street. It was formerly called Marine Square, from the number of captains of merchant ships that lived in it. In the centre is the Danish Church and Churchyard.

WELLER’S PLACE, St. Pancras, is the second turning on the right hand side of the road going from the Small Pox Hospital.

WELLESLEY STREET, is in Seymour Street, Euston Square – 2. is in the King’s Lower Road, Chelsea – 3. is in the City Road. These Streets are named after the Duke of Wellington, when Sir Arthur Wellesley.

WELLINGTON BUILDINGS, Cannon Street Road, turns off at No. 16, Samuel Street.

WELLINGTON MEWS, are at No. 8, Queen Street, Windmill Street, Haymarket.

WELLINGTON PLACE. – 1. is in Francis Street, Brewer’s Green. – 2. is at No. 118, Drury Lane. – 3. is in Back Lane, near Cross Street, Hatton Garden. – 4. is in John’s Row, St. Luke’s. – 5. is at Broomfields, Deptford. – 6�??. is in Well Street, Poplar. – 7. is in the Albany Road. – 8. is in the Kingsland Road. – 9. is in Dorset Place, Walworth. – 10. is near Vauxhall Turnpike. – 11. is in Bethnal Green. – 12. is in Wellington Street, Blackfriars’ Road. – 13. is in Goswell Street. – 14. is in Britain Street, City Road. – 15. is in Long Lane, Southwark. – 16. is in Gloucester Street, Vauxhall Walk. – 17. is in North Street, Whitechapel Road.

WELLINGTON ROW, Hackney Road, is in Bird Cage Walk.

WELLINGTON SQUARE, Gray’s Inn Lane Road, is in Sidmouth Street.

WELLINGTON STREET. – 1. is in Gedling Street, Dock Head. – 2. is in Manor Street, Chelsea – 3. is in Southampton Street, Camberwell New Town. – 4. is at No. 148, Kingsland Road. – 5. is in North Street, Whitechapel Road. – 6. is in the Strand, and leads from opposite the Lyceum Theatre to Waterloo Bridge. – 7. is at Newington Causeway. – 8. is in Collier Street, Pentonville. – 9. is in Goswell Street. – 10. is in Great Surrey Street, Blackfriars’ Road.

WELLINGTON TERRACE. – 1. is in Wellington Street, Blackfriars’ Road. – 2. is in the Waterloo Bridge Road.

WENLOCK PLACE, City Road, is on the north side between Windsor Terrace and Anderson’s Buildings.

WENTWORTH PLACE, Mile End Road, is about one fifth of a mile below the turnpike.

WENTWORTH STREET, Spitalfields, is the first turning on the left hand side of Osborne Street.

WEST OF ENGLAND FIRE AND LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY OFFICE, is at No. 20, Bridge Street, Blackfriars.

WEST INDIA DOCKS, THE, are situated in the northern part of the Isle of Dogs, and consist of two Docks and the City canal. The northern Dock is for vessels inward, and the southern Docks for vessels outwards bound. The canal, which has been recently purchased of the Corporation of London, is now no longer used for transit, but only for laying up, repairing, &c.

These Docks have been formed at the expense, of a joint stock company, incorporated by acts of parliament, in July, 1799. The company is governed by a board of directors, of whom four must be aldermen, and four common councilmen of London. The present, are Andrew Colville, Esq., Chairman; Samuel Hebbert, Esq., Deputy Chairman; J. Chapman, Edward Colebatch,* J. H, Deffel, J. Drinkald,* John Ede, Alderman Sir Chas. Flower, Bart., R. S. Grant, Alderman Wm. Heygate, Alderman Sir Claudius S. Hunter, Bart., John Irving, Charles M’Garet, Rowland Mitchel, Claude Nelson, John Plummer, Alderman Sir James Shaw, Bart., Robert Slade,* John Smith,* and Jos. Timperson, Esqrs., Directors. – N.B. Those marked with a star are the members of the common council appointed by the act. H. Longlands, Esq., Secretary; Captain C. Parrish, Dock Master.

WEST INDIA DOCK COMPANY’S OFFICE, THE, is in Billiter Square, Fenchurch Street.

WEST LANE, Bermondsey, is between Cherry Garden Street and Mill Pond Bridge.

WEST LONDON ROYAL INFIRMARY AND LYING-IN INSTITUTION, THE, is at No. 28, Villiers Street, Strand, and was established in 1818, under the patronage of the King and the leading nobility. The Rev. Dr. Richards, and A. Copeland, Esq., Treasurers; Messrs. Drummonds, Bankers; Benjamin Golding, Esq., Director; Wm. Shearman, M.D., and G. G. Sigmond, M.D., Physicians; T. J. Pettigrew, Esq., Surgeon; John Robertson, Esq., Honorary Secretary.

WEST MIDDLESEX WATER COMPANY, THE OFFICE, is in Berner’s Street�??, Oxford Street. Thomas Abbott Green, Esq., Chairman; William Fisher, Esq., Deputy Chairman; ten Directors; M. K. Knight, Esq., Secretary; William Tierney Clark, Esq., Engineer; Edward S. Bailey, Esq., Solicitor.

WESTERN DISPENSARY, THE, is in Charles Street, Westminster, was instituted in 1789, for relief of the sick poor of the City of Westminster and its vicinity, and for vaccination. The rules and regulations of this dispensary are fully detailed in Mr. Highmore’s Pietas Londinensis. The present officers are H.R.H. Prince Leopold, Patron; the Duke of Buccleugh, President; twelve Vice Presidents; Charles Hallett, Esq., Treasurer; Daniel M’Kennon, M.D., John J.Furnival, M.D., and J. James, M.D., Physicians; Joshua Oliver, Esq., Surgeon; Benjamin Golding, M.D., Physician Accoucheur; Wm. Lendennan, Esq., Secretary, and Mr. John Capon, No. 55, Marsham Street, Westminster, Collector.

WESTERN CITY DISPENSARY, THE. – [see City Dispensary, The Western]

WESTLYAN METHODIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY OFFICE, is at No. 77, Hatton Garden. This society was established in 1820, and have sent missions to almost every part of the globe, and have translated the new testaments into many languages. It is under the management of a committee of forty three, besides the president of the conference.

WEST PLACE. – 1. is the first turning on the left hand from Patriot Square, Bethnal Green. – 2. is opposite the entrance to West Street, St. George’s Fields. – 3. is in Ratcliffe Row, St. Luke’s.

WEST SQUARE, St. George’s Fields, is the fifth turning on the left hand going from the Elephant and Castle.

WEST STREET. – 1. is in Seven Dials, St. Giles’s. – 2. is at the north west corner of West Smithfield. – 3. is in the New Road, Somers Town. – 4. is in Green Street, Bethnal Green. – 5. is in Crispin Street, Spitalfields. – 6. is in Prospect Place, St. George’s Fields.

WESTBOURNE PLACE, King’s Road, adjoins the north east corner of Sloane Square.

WESTBOURNE STREET, Chelsea, is in Ebury Street.

WESTBY’S ALMS HOUSES, Hoxton, are at the north end of Gloucester Terrace, and opposite Brett’s Buildings. They were founded in 1749, by Mrs. Mary Westby, of Bocking, Essex, for ten poor women.

WESTERN PASSAGE, St. George’s in the East, is near the south end of Marman Street, and leads into Patriot Street.

WESTMINSTER, THE CITY OF, is the western portion of the British metropolis and derives its name from its abbey or minster, being situated to the westward of the city of London, and also to distinguish it from the Abbey of Grace on Tower Hill, called Eastminster. It was called by this name as early as 1066, in a charter of sanctuary granted by Edward the Confessor. Westminster owes its best privileges to Henry VIII., who erected it into a bishopric, and conferred several other honourable distinctions upon it.

The City of Westminster consists of two parishes, namely, St. Margaret’s and St. John the Evangelist; and its Liberties of seven, namely, those of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, St. James, St. Anne, Soho, St. Paul, Covent Garden, St. Mary-le-Strand, St. Clement’s Danes, St. George, Hanover Square, and the Precinct of the Savoy.

The government of Westminster is under that of the Very Rev. John Ireland, D.D., Dean of Westminster; Viscount Sidmouth, High Steward; Edward Robson, Esq., Deputy Steward; Arthur Morris, Esq., High Bailiff, Francis Smedley, Esq., Deputy Bailiff’; fif�??teen Burgesses; and fourteen Assistants for the several parishes; John Robson, Esq., Town Clerk; William Lee, High Constable; William Wilson, Court Keeper; Griffith Rowland, Crier and Mace Keeper; Samuel Farley, Sealer of Weights and Measures; H. Reynell, Printer to the court.

WESTMINSTER ABBEY, or, the Collegiate Church of St. Peter, Westminster, is situated on the western side of Westminster Hall. The origin and dedication of this ancient Abbey is involved in much obscurity and fabulous legend. The most credible account is that it was founded by Sebert, King of the East Saxons, who died in 616.

This church and its monastery were afterwards repaired and enlarged by Offa, King of Mercia, but being destroyed by the Danes, they were rebuilt by King Edgar, who endowed them with lands and manors, and in 969 granted them many privileges. Being again ravaged by the Danes, they were rebuilt by Edward the Confessor, in a magnificent manner, and in the form of a cross. The work being finished in 1065, they were consecrated with the greatest pomp and solemnity, and all their ancient rights and privileges, with many additional, were confirmed to them by charter.

William the Norman, further embellished the church and made it many handsome presents; and at the Christmas following his assumption of the Crown of England, he was solemnly crowned therein, this being the first coronation performed within its walls. The next prince who improved this national building was Henry III., who added to, and much repaired it. These repairs were completed by his successor in 1285, which is the date of the building as it now stands.

About 1502 King Henry VII. began the splendid chapel that is called by his name. This chapel, like that of Henry III., which he pulled down to make room for it, he dedicated to the Virgin Mary, and designed it for a burial place for himself and his posterity.

At the time of the suppression of the religious houses, the Abbey was surrendered to Henry VIII., who dissolved it, and erected it into a college of secular canons, under the government of a dean. Mary restored it to its original conventical state, and Queen Elizabeth finally ejected the monks, and in 1560 erected the Abbey into a college as at present. The western towers were built by Sir Christopher Wren, and many subsequent repairs and embellishments have been executed by our various monarchs.

The Abbey is particularly to be admired for the venerable beauty of its architecture, for the many ancient and modern monuments to the memory of our greatest characters, and for many other curiosities, too numerous to be detailed in a limited work like the present.

The present Collegiate Chapter of Westminster, is the Very Rev. John Ireland, P.D., Dean of Westminster, and Dean of the Order of the Bath, 1816; the Rev. Thomas Causton, D.D., 1799; H. H. Edwards, M.A., 1803; Joseph Allen, D.D., 1806; William, Bishop of Exeter, 1809; W. H. E. Bentinck, M.A., 1809: James Webber, B.D., 1816; Wellva Tournay, D.D., 1818; Andrew Bell, D.C.L., 1819; George Holcombe, D.D., 1822; Edmund Goodenough, D.D., 1826; T. Manners Sutton, M.A., 1827, and Archdeacon Bayley, D.D., 1828, Prebendaries; W.W. Dakins, D.D., Precentor; T. W. Champness, M.A., Richard Webb, M.A., E. G. Beckwith, M.A., H. Butterfield, M.A., R. J. Waters, M.A., Minor Canons.

WESTMINSTER BLUE COAT SCHOOL. – [see Blue Coat School, Westminster]

WESTMINSTER BRIDGE, crosses the Thames from Old Palace Yard to the opposite shore in Surrey. An act of parliament was passed in 1736 for building this bridge, and the first stone was laid in a caisson on the 29th of January, 1739, by the Earl of Pembroke, �??and the last stone was laid on the 10th of November, 1750, by Thomas Ledyard, Esq., and on the 17th of the same month by a procession of gentlemen, and much ceremony.

This Bridge was designed by, and executed under the direction of M. Labelye, a Swiss architect and engineer of great celebrity. It consists of thirteen semi-circular arches, and a small land arch at each end. The whole length of the bridge is 1223 feet, the width of the centre arch 76 feet, and the rest decrease regularly 4 feet in width on each side. The bridge is now undergoing a substantial repair, as some of the piers have been found defective.

WESTMINSTER BRIDGE ROAD, St. George’s in the Fields, is the road which extends from the Obelisk, by the Surrey Theatre, towards the bridge.

WESTMINSTER COLLEGE. – [see Westminster School]

WESTMINSTER COURT HOUSE. – [see Guildhall, Westminster]

WESTMINSTER FRENCH CHARITY SCHOOL, THE, Windmill Street, was instituted in 1747, for the instructing, clothing, maintaining and putting out apprentices, poor Children descended of French Protestant Refugees, born in or near London, who have no parochial settlement. It is under the patronage of the Society for promoting Christian Knowledge.

WESTMINSTER FIRE OFFICE, THE, is in King Street, Covent Garden, opposite Bedford Street. This Assurance Company was incorporated in 1717 and was originally held at Tom’s Coffee House, in St. Martin’s Lane, then in Bedford Street, and recently as above. It is under the management of William Crake, Esq., Chairman; and twenty-three other Directors; George How Brown, Esq., Secretary; and James Gray Mayhew, Esq., Surveyor of Buildings.

WESTMINSTER GENERAL DISPENSARY, THE, is held at No. 9, Gerrard Street, Soho.

This charity was founded in 1774, under the patronage of the Prince of Wales (afterwards George IV.), for the relief of the Sick and Lame Poor in the District of Westminster. It is under the government of the King, Patron; their Royal Highnesses the Dukes of Sussex and Gloucester, Vice Patron; the Duke of Northumberland, President; the Duke of Devonshire, and fourteen other noblemen and gentlemen, Vice Presidents; Sir Peter Laurie and George Hammersley, Esq., Treasurers; Alexander Henderson, M.D. and J. Merriman, M.D., Consulting Physicians; A. B. Granville, M.D., Physician Accoucheur; George Ricketts Nuttall, M.D., Physician; A. C. Hutchinson and T. W. Chevalier, Esqs., Surgeons; Thomas Copeland, Esq., Consulting Surgeon; Robert Wade, Esq., Apothecary; and W. J. Wills, Esq., Secretary.

WESTMINSTER HALL, is situated between the Abbey and the River Thames, and was built by William Rufus, in 1098, but was repaired and enlarged in 1397 by Richard II., who entertained 10,000 persons within its walls at a Christmas festival, and it is still used by the Kings of England for their coronation feasts. Parliaments have frequently been held in this hall, and in it was held the ancient court of justice, in which the King presided in person. On the western side of the hall are the new courts of justice recently erected by John Soane, Esq., R.A., of which he has published engravings and descriptive accounts in a large folio volume. The first on the right hand in the corner is the Court of King’s Bench and its bail court, the next is the Court of Common Pleas, the third is the Court of Exchequer, and the last is the Court of Chancery. Up the steps at the northern end of the hall, are the entrances to the Houses of Lords and Commons.

WESTMINSTER HOSPITAL, THE, or Public Infirmary, is situated at the east end of James Street, Buckingham Gate. �??It is the oldest establishment of the kind in the metropolis, having been established in 1719, for the relief of the sick and needy from all parts. It is under the government of the King, Patron; H.R.H. the Duke of Sussex, Vice Patron; the Duke of Northumberland, President; twelve Vice Presidents; the Hon. S. P. Bouverie and C. Hoare, Esq., Treasurers; John Richards, Office Secretary; and Eden Harwood, Accountant.

WESTMINSTER LYING-IN INSTITUTION, Queen Square, Westminster. This charitable institution for the relief of poor married women in the vicinity, was instituted in 1801. J. Davis, Esq., Treasurer, and J. Elliot, Esq., Secretary.

WESTMINSTER NEW CHARITY SCHOOL, Dacre Street, was established in 1796, for educating and clothing one hundred male and female children. The Rev. Isaac Saunders, Thomas Maude and Thomas Hubert, Esqs., Trustees; George Gregorie, Esq., Treasurer, and Mr. George Capon, Schoolmaster,

WESTMINSTER NATIONAL FREE SCHOOL, THE, is near St. Margaret’s Church, was instituted in 1796, and is under the management of the rector and churchwardens and a committee of parishioners.

WESTMINSTER LYING-IN HOSPITAL, THE, is situated about a furlong on the left hand side of the road, going from Westminster Bridge.

It was established in 1705, as an asylum for poor married women, the wives of poor industrious tradesmen or distressed house-keepers. It is liberally supported by voluntary contributions and is under the management of the Queen, Patroness; Earl Grosvenor, President; four Vice Presidents; John Wallace, Esq., Treasurer; D. Poignand and Dr. Thynne, Physicians and Accoucheurs; J. Matthias, Esq., Surgeon; the Rev. O. Gibson, M.A., Chaplain,

WESTMINSTER SCHOOL, is situated on the south side of the Abbey, and having been founded by Queen Elizabeth, in 1590, is sometimes called Queen’s College. Her majesty founded it for the classical education of forty boys, who are prepared for the university, and are called king’s or queen’s scholars, as the reigning monarch may happen to be. Besides these a great number of the sons of the nobility and gentry are educated here, which has rendered it one of the most celebrated schools in the Kingdom. A certain number of the king’s scholars are sent, when qualified, to the Universities, namely, to Trinity College, Cambridge and to Christ Church, Oxford. There appears to have been a school here from the first foundation of the abbey; Ingulphus, Abbot of Crowland, speaks of his having been educated therein, and of the disputations he had with the Queen of Edward the Confessor, and of the presents she made him in money, in his boyish days.

It is at present under the management of the Dean of Westminster, Visitor; the Rev. Richard Williamson, M.A., Head Master, 1828; the Rev. George Preston, jun., M.A., Under Master, 1826; the Rev. W. Church Totten, M.A., Rev. Hugh Hodson, M.A., the Rev. Robert B. Bourne, M.A., the Rev. Charles W. Knyvett, M.A., Mr. W. J. E. Bennet, B.A., and Mr. J. Bentall, M.A., Ushers.

WESTMINSTER SOCIETY, THE, is at No. 429, in the Strand and in Cornhill, for insurance on lives and survivorships, and for granting annuities. It is under the management of Sir John Cox Hippesley, Bart., Chairman; Sir George Hampson, Bart., Deputy Chairman; and sixteen other Directors; John Helps, Esq., Secretary; Edward H. Williams, Esq., Solicitor.

WESTMINSTER ROYAL INFIRMARY AND OPTHALMIC HOSPITAL, THE, is in Mary-le-bone Street, Piccadilly, and was instituted in 1816, for the humane purpose of receiving under its care, all sailors and soldiers, out pensioners or otherwise discharged from the service, and their wives and children, wh�??o suffer from diseases of the eye. The King, Patron; the Duke of Wellington, President; thirty Six Vice Presidents; S. Reed, Esq., Treasurer; C. F. Forbes, M.D., Physician; G. J. Guthrie, Esq., Surgeon.

WESTMORELAND BUILDINGS, Aldersgate Street, is about seventeen houses on the west side, going from Little Britain.

WESTMORELAND PLACE, City Road, is the continuation of Providence Street, going towards Islington.

WESTMORELAND STREET, Great Mary-le-bone Street, is about six houses from Wimpole Street.

WESTON COURT, Southwark, is the first turning on the right hand side of Weston Street, going from Snow’s Fields.

WESTON PLACE, Somers Town, is part of the left hand side of the road, by King’s Cross, Battle Bridge.

WESTON STREET. – 1. is in Somers Town, the first turning on the left hand of the preceding. – 2. is in Pentonville, nearly opposite the chapel, and leads to Clerkenwell. – 3. is the continuation of the Maze, Southwark, going from Tooley Street.

WEYMOUTH MEWS. – 1. UPPER is in Weymouth Street, Mary-le-bone, the first turning on the left hand side, going from Portland Place. – 2. LOWER, is three houses westward of the preceding.

WEYMOUTH PLACE, Kent Road, is a few houses on the south side, near the Elephant and Castle.

WEYMOUTH STREET, Kent Road, is the first turning on the right hand side of that road, going from the Elephant and Castle.

WEYMOUTH STREET, Mary-le-bone, is the second turning on the right hand side of Portland Road, going from the New Road.

WHALEBONE COURT. – 1. is in Throgmorton Street, opposite the north east corner of the Bank of England. – 2. is in Great Bell Alley, Coleman Street, the second turning on the left.

WHARTON’S COURT, Holborn, is three houses westward of Brook Street.

WHAYMAN’S BUILDINGS, Bermondsey Spa, is nearly opposite Augustus Row.

WHEELER’S BUILDINGS, Whitechapel, is three houses on the right hand side of George Yard, going from Wentworth Street.

WHEELER STREET, Spitalfields, is the third turning on the left hand side, going from Bishopsgate Street through Spital Square.

WHETSTONE PARK, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, is the first turning on the right hand in Great Turnstile, behind and parallel to the north side.

WHISTLER’S COURT, Salters’ Hall Passage, is the second turning on the left hand, going from Cannon Street.

WHISTLER’S GROUND, Westminster, is the third turning on the left hand side of Great Peter Street, going from Great Smith Street.

WHITCOMB COURT, Whitcomb Street, is the first turning on the right hand side, going from Coventry Street.

WHITCOMB STREET, Charing Cross, is the first turning on the right hand side, going from the Strand towards the Haymarket.

WHITE’S ALLEY. – 1. is about the middle of the east side of Chancery Lane. – 2. is in Coleman Street, the fifth turning on the right hand from Lothbury. – 3. is in Long Alley, Finsbury, the first turning on the left hand side going from Worship Street.

WHITE BALL COURT, Leicester Square, is six houses on the �??right hand side of Castle Street, going from Hemming’s Row.

WHITE BEAR ALLEY, Aldgate High Street, is about ten houses eastward of the church.

WHITE BEAR COURT, Southwark, is about a furlong from St. George’s Church.

WHITE BEAR YARD. – 1. is in Eyre Street, Leather Lane, Holborn, the first turning on the right hand, going from the north end of it. – 2. is in Kent Street, Southwark, about a furlong on the right hand from St. George’s Church.

WHITECHAPEL HIGH STREET, is a long and wide Street, which extends from the north east corner of Somerset Street to the church, from which it takes its name. – [see St. Mary, Whitechapel]

WHITECHAPEL BARS, are at the end of Middlesex and Somerset Streets, and mark the eastern boundaries of the city liberties, in that direction.

WHITECHAPEL MARKET, is a considerable meat market, on the south side of the street.

WHITECHAPEL ROAD, extends from the church to the beginning of Mile End.

WHITECHAPEL WORKHOUSE, Whitechapel Road, is about a quarter of a mile on the left hand side of the road below the church.

WHITECHAPEL SCHOOL, is a free school, founded by the Rev. Ralph Davenant, rector of the parish, in conjunction with his wife and sister in 1680; which was augmented by the donation of £1,000 from an unknown person.

WHITE’S COURT. – 1. is in Finsbury, the third turning on the left hand side of Ropemaker’s Street, going from the north west corner of the Pavement. – 2. is in the Vine Yard, Tooley Street.

WHITECROSS PLACE, Finsbury, about six houses in Wilson Street, going from Crown Street.

WHITECROSS STREET, Cripplegate, extends from Fore Street to nearly opposite the church, Old Street, and derives its name from a white cross which anciently stood at its upper end.

WHITECROSS STREET PRISON, the debtors’ prison for the City of London and county of Middlesex, and was built from the designs of William Montague, Esq., the Clerk of the City Works. The first stone was laid by Alderman Wood, in July, 1813, and it was finished in 1815.

WHITECROSS STREET, Southwark, is about twelve houses on the left hand side of Queen Street, going from Union Street.

WHITEFRIARS, is a district of the city, which extends from the western side of Water Lane, Fleet Street, to the Temple, and from Fleet Street to the Thames. It derives its name from being the site of the ancient Convent of Carmellites, or White-friars, who were so called from their white garments. This convent was founded in 1241, by Sir Richard Grey, ancestor of the Lord Greys, of Codnor, in Derbyshire, and was afterwards rebuilt about 1350, by Hugh Courtney, Earl of Devonshire, when the ground given to the order by Edward I. to enlarge their buildings was taken in. The conventual church was built by Sir Robert Knowles, a great warrior in the reigns of Edward III. and Richard II., and it was the burial place of many persons of distinction.

At the dissolution of the religious houses, in the reign of Henry VIII., this convent and its church were surrendered to the crown, and the King conferred different portions of the buildings to his favourites; and in 1657 Edward VI. granted the church, chapter house, and other parts of the priory to the Bishop of Worcester and his successors.

In 1608, the in�??habitants of this district obtained several liberties, privileges and exemptions, by a charter granted them by James I., which placed them out of the jurisdiction of the City of London. This soon rendered the place an asylum for insolvent debtors, cheats and gamblers, who gave it the name of Alsatia, which figures so conspicuously in Sir Walter Scott’s lively tale of the Fortunes of Nigel. The inconvenience became at last so intolerable, that in 1696 an act of parliament was passed to deprive the district of privileges that were so injurious to the community.

WHITEFRIARS’ DOCK, is facing the southern end of Water Lane,

WHITE’S GROUNDS. – 1. are in Bermondsey, the first turning on the right hand side of Crucifix Lane, going from Bermondsey Street. – 2. are in the Bethnal Green Road, the first turning on the right hand side eastward of the turnpike.

WHITEHALL. – [see Banqueting House]

WHITE HART COURT. – 1. is in Windmill Street, Tottenham Court Road, about six houses on the left hand side of that road. – 2. is in Cable Street, Leicester Square, ten houses northward of Hemming’s Row. – 3. is in Long Lane, West Smithfield, the second tuning on the right hand side going from Aldersgate Street. – 4. is in Charter House Lane, the second turning on the right hand from St. John Street. – 5. is in Lombard Street, the last turning on the right hand from the Mansion house. – 6. is in Bishopsgate Street Without, the second turning northward of the church. – 7. is in Hoxton, about a quarter of a mile on the right hand side going from Old Street Road. – 8. is in Gasgoine Place, Bethnal Green, the first turning on the left hand side going from Castle Street. – 9. is in Greenfield Street, Mile End Old Town, the first turning on the right hand from Fieldgate Street. – 10. is in Green Bank, Wapping, the second turning on the right hand side going from the church.

WHITE HART PLACE. – 1. is in Kennington Lane, and forms part of the left hand side of the lane. – 2. is in Robin Hood Lane, Blackwall, three houses on the left hand side going from the eastern end of Poplar High Street

WHITE HART ROW. – 1. is in Gravel Lane, Southwark, at the east end of George Street, Blackfriars’ Road. – 2. is in Kennington Lane, the first turning on the right hand side, going from Kennington Cross. – 3. is in Gray’s Inn Lane, about half a mile from Holborn.

WHITE HART STREET, Warwick Lane, is the first turning on the right hand side, going from Paternoster Row.

WHITE HART YARD. – 1. is in Tottenham Court Road, about three eighths of a mile on the right hand from Oxford Street. – 2. is in Drury Lane, the first turning on the left hand, a few yards from Holborn. – 3. is in Drury Lane, the second turning on the right hand in Catherine Street. – 4. is in Brook Street, Holborn, opposite Brooks Market. – 5. is in London Wall, near the south east corner of Moorfields.

WHITE HIND ALLEY, Willow Street, Bankside, is on the east side of Brook’s Wharf.

WHITE HIND COURT, Bishopsgate Without, is opposite Widegate Street.

WHITE HORSE ALLEY, Clerkenwell, is about the middle of the west side of Turnmill Street.

WHITE HORSE COURT. – 1. is in Whitecross Street, St. Luke’s, leading to Cherry Tree Alley. – 2. is in Long Lane, West Smithfield. – 3. is in Wheeler Street, Spitalfields. – 4. is in Rosemary Lane, near the Minories. – 5. is in High Street, Southwark. – 6. is in Bermondsey Street. – 7. is in Star Corne�??r, Bermondsey.

WHITE HORSE STREET, Piccadilly, is about half a mile on the right hand side, going from the Haymarket.

WHITE HORSE STREET, Ratcliffe, is the continuation of Butcher’s Row.

WHITE HORSE YARD. – 1. is in New Bond Street. – 2. is in the Broadway, Westminster. – 3. is in Diot Street, Bloomsbury. – 4. is in Drury Lane, the fifth turning on the right hand side, going from Wych Street. – 5. is in Coleman Street, near London Wall. – 6. is in Lower East Smithfield. – 7. is in Parsons Street, Upper East Smithfield. – 8. is in Kent Street, Southwark.

WHITE LINEN COURT, Bankside, Southwark, is a few yards west of Thames Street.

WHITE LION COURT. – 1. is in Little Bell Alley, London Wall. – 2. is in Birchin Lane, the second turning on the left hand side, going from Cornhill. – 3. is in Cornhill, near Bishopsgate Street. – 4. is in Throgmorton Street, near Broad Street. – 5. is in Bankside, Southwark. – 6. is in Bermondsey Street, leading to Snow’s Fields. – 7. is in White Lion Street, Seven Dials. – 8. is in Charter House Lane, the second turning on the left hand side, going from Charter House Square.

WHITE LION SQUARE, Bishopsgate, is on the north side of Liverpool Street, formerly Old Bethlem.

WHITE LION STREET. – 1. is in Norton Falgate. – 2. is in Seven Dials. – 3. LITTLE, is also in Seven Dials, the continuation of the preceding. – 4. is in Pentonville, the first turning on the left in High Street. – 5. is in Goodman’s Fields, the continuation of Lemon Street.

WHITE LION YARD. – 1. is in Tower Street. – 2. is in White Lion Street, Norton Falgate. – 3. is in Whitecross Street, St. Luke’s. – 4. is in Oxford Street, nearly opposite the Pantheon.

WHITE ROSE ALLEY, Whitecross Street, Cripplegate, the first turning on the left hand from Chiswell Street.

WHITE ROSE COURT. – 1. is in Coleman Street, opposite Bell Alley. – 2. is Widegate Street, Bishopsgate.

WHITE’S ROW, Baker’s Row, Whitechapel Road, the first turning on the right hand from it.

WHITE’S STREET. – 1. is the continuation of Fashion Street, Spitalfields. – 2. is in the Bethnal Green Road. – 3. is in Cutler Street, Houndsditch. – 4. is in Church Street, Southwark. – 5. is in Finsbury, the first turning south parallel to Ropemaker’s Street.

WHITE THORN COURT, St. George’s in the East, is the first turning on the left hand side of King Street, from Gravel Lane.

WHITE’S YARD. – 1. is in Great Saffron Hill, Hatton Garden. – 2. is in Whitecross Street, St. Luke’s, the first turning on the right hand from Old Street. – 3. is in the Mile End Road, about a furlong from Stepney Green. – 4. is in Rosemary Lane, near Upper East Smithfield.

WHITFIELD STREET, Shoreditch, is the first turning on the left hand side of Leonard Street, going from Paul Street.

WHITING’S RENTS, Bermondsey, is the second turning on the right hand side of Hickman’s Folly, going from Dock Head.

WHITING’S YARD, Tooley Street, is the first turning on the right hand side of Dog and Bear Yard, going from that street.

WHITTINGTON’S COLLEGE. – [see College Hill and Mercers’ Alms Houses, No. 1]

WHITLEY’S COURT, St. Luke’s, is the second turning on the right hand side of Brick Lane, going from Old Street.

WICHER’S or WHITCHER’S ALMS HOUSES, are in Little Chapel Street, Westminster, on the east side of the Blue Coat School, and were founded by George Wicher or Witcher, in 1683, for six poor aged persons.

WICKHAM COURT, Wych Street, Drury Lane, is near Newcastle Street.

WIDEGATE STREET, Bishopsgate Without, is the third turning on the right hand side of the street going from the church.

WIDNAL’S PLACE; Hatton Wall, is about twelve houses on the left hand side of Vine Street, going from Little Saffron Hill.

WIDOWS, &c, OF CLERGY [see Sons of the Clergy]

WIGMORE STREET, Cavendish Square, is at the north west corner of the square; it leads into Portman Square.

WILD COURT, Clare Market, is about twelve houses on the left hand side of Great Wild Street, going from Great Queen Street.

WILD STREET, GREAT, is the first turning on the right hand side in Great Queen Street, going from Drury Lane.

WILD STREET, LITTLE, is the second turning on the left hand in the preceding.

WILDERNESS LANE, Salisbury Square, is the second turning on the right hand side of Dorset Street, going from Fleet Street.

WILDERNESS ROW. – 1. is in Goswell Street, nearly opposite Old Street. – 2. is in Chelsea, the last turning on the right hand in Royal Hospital Row.

WILKIE’S COURT, Shoreditch, is the third turning on the left hand side of the High Street, going from the church.

WILK’S STREET, Quaker Street, Spitalfields, the second turning on the left hand from Brick Lane.

WILLIAMS’ (Dr.) LIBRARY. – [see Redcross Street Library]

WILLIS’S COURT, Bridgewater Gardens, the first turning on the right hand side of Brackley Street, going from Golden Lane.

WILLIS’S BUILDINGS, Spa Road, Bermondsey, between the Spa and Printers Place.

WILLIS’S RENTS, Bermondsey Street, about ten houses on the left hand from Russell Street.

WILLIS’S ROOMS, King Street, St. James’s. – [see Almack’s Assembly Rooms]

WILLIAM’S BUILDINGS. – 1. is in French Alley, Goswell Street. – 2. is in Three Hammer Alley, St. Thomas’s, Southwark.

WILLIAM’S COURT, Southwark, is the second turning on the left hand side of Maid Lane, going from Gravel Lane.

WILLIAM’S MEWS, Mary-le-bone, are in Devonshire Street, between Portland Place and Portland Road.

WILLIAM STREET. – 1. is in Henry Street, Gray’s Inn Lane. – 2. is in Lant Street, Southwark, near Blackman Street. – 3. is in Pitt Street, Kent Road, nearly opposite the Bricklayers’ Arms. – 4. is the first turning on the left hand in Charlotte Street, Blackfriars’ Road. – 5. is in Union Street, Lambeth. – 6. is in Mary-le-bone Lane, the third turning on the left hand side going from Oxford Street. – 7. is in James Street, Westminster. – 8. is in the Adelphi. – 9. is in New Bridge Street, Blackfriars. – 10. is in Cannon Street Road, St. Georg�??e’s in the East, the second turning on the left hand from the turnpike. – 11. is in Mile End Old Town, the first turning on the left hand side going from the Commercial Road. – 12. is in Shoreditch, the first turning on the right hand side of the High Street, going from the church.

WILLOW COURT. – 1. is in Steward Street, Goswell Street, the first turning on the left hand. – 2. is in Willow Street, Paul Street, Finsbury,

WILLOW ROW, Goswell Street, about twelve houses northward of Old Street.

WILLOW STREET. – 1. is in Paul Street, Finsbury, the second turning on the left hand side going from Leonard Street. – 2. is in Bankside, Southwark, the continuation of it to Gravel Lane.

WILLOW WALK. – 1. is in Tothill Fields, Westminster. – 2. is in Haberdashers’ Walk, Hoxton. – 3. is in the Curtain Road, Shoreditch. – 4. is in the Hackney Road. – 6. is in the Grange Road, Bermondsey, near Page’s Walk.

WILLOW TREE COURT. – 1. is in Lower Turning, Shadwell. – 2. is in Newmarket Street, Wapping.

WILLSTEAD STREET, Somers Town, is the third turning on the right hand side of the New Road, going from King’s Cross, Battle Bridge.

WILMOT COURT, Southwark, is about ten houses on the left hand side of White Street, going from St. George’s Church.

WILMOT’S FOLLY, Bethnal Green Road, is at the north end of Mary’s Row.

WILMOT’S GROVE, Bethnal Green Road, is on the north side of Wilmot Square.

WILMOT SQUARE, Bethnal Green Road, is about a quarter of a mile from Shoreditch.

WILMOT STREET. – 1. is in the Bethnal Green Road. – 2. is in Bernard Street, Brunswick Square.

WILSON COURT. – 1. is in Kent Street, Southwark. – 2. is in Maid Lane, Southwark.

WILSON’S PLACE, Limehouse, is the first turning on the left hand side of Salmon’s Lane, going from the Commercial Road.

WILSON STREET, Finsbury, is near the middle of the north side, and extends into Paul Street.

WILTON PLACE, Belgrave Square, is a row of houses recently built upon Earl Grosvenor’s estate, at Chelsea, between the Knightsbridge Road and Belgrave Square; It is named after one of his lordship’s titles.

WILTON STREET, Belgrave Square, is adjoining the preceding, and extends into the Knightsbridge Road.

WILTON Crescent, Belgrave Square, is between the two preceding and Grosvenor Place.

WIMPOLE MEWS. – 1. are in Devonshire Street, Mary-le-bone. – 2. are in Weymouth Street, Mary-le-bone.

WIMPOLE STREET, Cavendish Square, is a few houses westward of the square.

WIMPOLE STREET, UPPER, is the continuation of the preceding, from Weymouth Street to Devonshire Street.

WINCHESTER COURT, Falcon Square, is about six houses on the right hand side, of Monkwell Street, going from the square.

WINCHESTER PLACE. – 1. in Pentonville, about a furlong from the Angel, at Islington. – 2. is in the Hackney Road, near the end of Willow Walk.

WINCHESTER ROW, Hackney Road, is a few small houses behind Well’s Row, and near�?? the preceding.

WINCHESTER STREET. – 1. is in Pentonville, the third turning on the right hand side going from the chapel towards King’s Cross, Battle Bridge. – 2. is in Old Broad Street, nearly, opposite the Excise Office, and derives its name from being the site of the ancient mansion of the Earls of Winchester, built by Sir William Pawlet, Marquess of Winchester, in the reign of Edward VI. – 3. LITTLE, is four houses on the right hand side of the preceding, going from Old Broad Street. – 4. is in the Borough Market by St. Saviours Church, named from being the site of the ancient palace of the Bishops of Winchester. – 5. LITTLE, is the first turning on the right hand side of the preceding, going from the church.

WINDMILL COURT. – 1. is in Giltspur Street, about ten houses on the right hand side going from Newgate Street. – 2. is in Rosemary Lane, about three houses westward of White’s Yard.

WINDMILL ROW, Kennington Green is on the west side near the Windmill Tavern.

WINDMILL STREET. – 1. is in Tottenham Court Road, opposite Great Store Street. – 2. GREAT, is in the Haymarket, opposite the north end. – 3. LITTLE, is the continuation of the preceding into Silver Street. – 4. is in the City Road, a few yards on the right hand side going from the north west corner of Finsbury Square. It is on the site of the ancient Windmill Hill, which was raised by above a thousand cart loads of human bones brought from St. Paul’s charnel house, in 1649, which soon being covered by the sweepings of the streets in the day, became used as a public laystall, whereby the ground became so much raised that three windmills were erected upon it.

WINDSOR COURT. – 1. is in Falcon Square, the first turning on the left hand side of Monkwell Street, going from the square. – 2. is in Little Knight Rider Street, the first turning on the right hand side going from the Old Change. – 3. is in the Strand, opposite Somerset Place.

WINDSOR PLACE, City Road, is about two thirds of a mile on the left hand side going from Finsbury Square.

WINDSOR STREET, Bishopsgate Street, Without, is the first turning on the right hand side of Widegate Street, going from Bishopsgate Street.

WINDSOR TERRACE, City Road, forms part of the north side of the road.

WINE OFFICE COURT, Fleet Street, is about the middle of the north side.

WINFORD COURT, Wentwoth Street, Spitalfields, is about six houses westward of Rose Lane.

WINKWORTH’S BUILDINGS, City Road, extends from Craven Buildings towards Hoxton Fields.

WINSLEY STREET, Oxford Street, is about a third of a mile on the right hand side, going from St. Giles’s, and opposite the Pantheon.

WISE COURT, Spitalfields, is the first turning on the left hand, side of Wheeler Street, going from Lamb Street.

WISE COURT, Southwark, is near the Vinegar Ground.

WISTER’S GROUND, Westminster, is about the middle of the south side of Great Peter Street.

WITHER’S COURT, St. Luke’s is the first turning on the left hand side of Whitecross Street.

WITTERN’S BUILDINGS, Old Street Road, forms part of the north side of the road.

WOBURN COURT, Bloomsbury, is the first turning on the right hand side of Duke Street, going from G�??reat Russell Street. It is named from Woburn Abbey, the seat of the Duke of Bedford.

WOBURN MEWS, Russell Square, is the first turning on the left hand side of Little Guilford Street, going from Bernard Street.

WOBURN PLACE, Russell Square, extends from the east side of the square towards Tavistock Square.

WOBURN STREET, Bloomsbury, is the third turning on the right hand side of Great Russell Street, going from Tottenham Court Road.

WOBURN STREET, Bridges Street, Covent Garden, is on the south side of Drury Lane Theatre, and leads to Russell Court.

WOOD’S ALMS HOUSES, Ratcliffe. – [see Coopers’ Hall]

WOODS, HIS MAJESTY’S FORESTS AND LAND REVENUE OFFICE, is at No. 2, Whitehall Place. – [see Land Revenue Office]

WOOD’S BUILDINGS. – 1. is in George Street, Chelsea, the first turning on the right hand side, going from Royal Hospital Row. – 2. is in New Inn Yard, Shoreditch, the last turning on the left hand from Shoreditch. – 3. is in Whitechapel Road, opposite the London Hospital.

WOODS CLOSE, Church Row, Bethnal Green, is on the south side of the church, near Hare Street.

WOOD’S COURT. – 1. is in Oxford Street, about the third of a mile on the right hand side, going from St. Giles’s. – 2. is in Norton Falgate, nearly opposite White Lion Street.

WOOD’S MEWS, Grosvenor Square, is the fourth turning on the right hand side of Park Street, going from Oxford Street.

WOOD’S PLACE, Clerkenwell, the first turning on the right hand side of Bowling Green Lane, going from Coppice Row.

WOOD’S RENTS, Bunhill Row, is the first turning on the right hand side of Chequer Alley, going from Whitecross Street.

WOOD STREET. – 1. is in Millbank Street, Westminster, the first turning on the right hand, going from Abingdon Street. – 2. is in Bayne’s Row, Spa Fields, Clerkenwell, near the House of Correction. – 3. is in Cheapside, the third turning on the left hand from Newgate Street, and extends from Cheapside to Cripplegate. – 4. is in Spitalfields, and extends from the north side of the church to Brown’s Lane. – 5. is in Bethnal Green, on the south side of the churchyard. – 6. is in St. Agnes-le-Clair, Finsbury, and is the last turning on the left hand side of North Street.

WOOD’S YARD, Spitalfields, is the second turning on the right hand side of Phoenix Street, going from Wheeler Street.

WOOD YARD, Southwark, is the first turning on the right hand side of Redcross Street, northward of Union Street.

WOODBRIDGE STREET, Clerkenwell, is about one third of a mile on the left hand side of St. John Street, going from West Smithfield.

WOODEN BRIDGE STAIRS, Westminster, are at the north east corner of New Palace Yard.

WOODNER COURT, Houndsditch, is the third turning on the right hand in Harrow Alley, going from Gravel Lane.

WOODSTOCK MEWS, Mary-le-bone, are in Woodstock Street, behind Weymouth Street.

WOODSTOCK STREET. – 1. is in Mary-le-bone, in Weymouth Street, opposite Beaumont Street. – 2. is in Paddington Street, Mary-le-bone, ten houses on the right hand side, going from High Street. – 3. is in O�??xford Street, between New Bond Street and South Molton Street.

WOODWARD’S COURT, Mary-le-bone, is the first turning on the right hand side of High Street, going from the New Road.

WOOLPACK ALLEY, Southwark, is in Bermondsey Street, near Snow’s Fields.

WOOLPACK GARDENS, Goswell Street Road, are a few houses on the right hand side of Gwyn’s Buildings, going from the City Road.

WOOLPACK YARD, Tooley Street, the first turning on the left hand side of Dog and Bear Yard, going from Tooley Street.

WOOLPACK YARD, Southwark, is about a quarter of a mile on the left hand side of Kent Street, going from St. George’s Church.

WOOLSTAPLERS ALMS HOUSES, THE, Westminster, are about ten houses on the right hand side of Great St. Anne’s Street, going from Great Peter Street.

WOLSINGHAM PLACE, Lambeth, is about half a mile on the left hand from Westminster Bridge.

WORCESTER COURT, Old Gravel Lane, is the first turning on the left hand side of Worcester Street, going from Old Gravel Lane towards the London Docks.

WORCESTER PLACE, Upper Thames Street, is nearly opposite Garlick Hill, and derives its name as being the site whereon the palace of the Bishops of Worcester stood before the fire of London.

WORCESTER STREET, St. George’s in the East, is about the middle of the west side of Old Gravel Lane.

WORCESTER STREET, Southwark, is the second turning on the right hand side of Queen Street, going from Union Hall.

WORKS, OFFICE OF, Guildhall, is the second door on the right hand side of the yard, at the north side of the Hall, going from Basinghall Street. It is under the management of William Mountague, Esq., the Clerk of the City’s Works.

WORKHOUSE LANE. – 1. is in Hoxton, at the north end of Queen’s Row. – 2. is in Lambeth, the continuation of Lambeth Butts.

WORLEY’S COURT, Minories, is opposite the Crescent.

WORMWOOD STREET, Bishopsgate Within, is the second turning on the left hand side going from Cornhill, and extends from Bishopsgate Street to Broad Street.

WORSHIP COURT, Shoreditch, is the fourth turning on the left hand side of Worship Street, going from Paul Street.

WORSHIP SQUARE, Shoreditch, is the third turning on the left hand side of Worship Street, going from Paul Street.

WORSHIP STREET, Finsbury, is the second turning on the right hand side, northward of the north east corner of Finsbury Square.

WRESTLERS’ COURT, Bishopsgate Within, is six houses southward of Camomile Street.

WRIGHT’S BUILDINGS, West Smithfield, is the second turning on the right hand side of West Street, going from Smithfield.

WRIGHT’S PASSAGE, Westminster, is about the middle of the south side of Tothill Street.

WRIGHT’S RENTS, Ratcliffe, is the first turning on the left hand side of Pell Street from the New Road.

WRIGHT’S RENTS, Grange Road, Bermondsey, is on the west side of Page’s Walk.

WYCH STREET, Drury Lane, is the first turning on both sides �??of Newcastle Street, from the New Church in the Strand.

WYCOMB PLACE, Southwark, is about a quarter of mile on the left hand side of Kent Street, going from St. George’s Church.

WYNDHAM PLACE, Bryanstone Square, is on the north side of the square, and crosses Crawford Street towards York Street.

WYNDHAM STREET, Bryanstone Square, is a little eastward of the preceding, and goes from York Street to the New Road.

WYNYATT STREET, Goswell Street Road, is about a furlong on the left hand side, northward of the turnpike.

WYNYATT PLACE, Goswell Street Road, is two or three houses on the right hand side of Wynyatt Street, going from Goswell Street Road.

XYZ

There are no places beginning with X

YAXLEY PLACE, Southwark, is the first turning on the right hand side of Little Lant Street, going from Lombard Street.

YEATS COURT, Chancery Lane, is the third turning on the right hand side of Carey Street, going from Portugal Street.

YEATS COURT, Finsbury, is the second turning on the left hand side of Long Alley, going from Sun Street.

YEATS RENTS, Clerkenwell Close, are a few houses northward of the church.

YOAKLEY’S BUILDINGS, Mile End Green, are nine houses eastward of the London Hospital.

YORK BUILDINGS. – 1. is in Grub Street, Westminster, about the middle of the east side, near the Horse Ferry Road. – 2. is in the Adelphi, the south side of Duke Street, and derives its name from a palace of the Archbishop of York, formerly situated on this spot, which was afterwards purchased by John, Duke of Buckingham, who let the property to different builders, who have preserved his name and title in the street built upon it, as John Street, Villiers Street, Duke Street, and Buckingham Street. – 3. is in the New Road, Mary-le-bone, at the north end of Baker Street. – 4. is in York Street, Pentonville, the second turning on the left, hand side, going from Clarence Place towards Weston Street. – 5. is in Bermondsey New Road, opposite the Bricklayers’ Arms. – 6. is in Hoxton Fields, about a quarter of a mile on the left hand, going from Winkworth’s Buildings.

YORK BUILDINGS, STAIRS or WATER GATE, are at the bottom of Buckingham Street, and are from the designs of Inigo Jones.

YORK COURT. – 1. is in East Street, Manchester Square, about twelve houses on the left hand side, going from David Street. – 2. is in York Street, Pentonville – 3. is in Paul Street; Finsbury Square – 4. is in York Street, London Road, St. George’s Fields.

YORK GATE, Regent’s Park is the entrance to the park from the New Road, opposite the New Road, Mary-le-bone.

YORK MEWS. – 1. SOUTH, is in Paddington Street, Mary-le-bone. – 2. NORTH, is in David Street, Mary-le-bone. – 3. GREAT, is in Upper Baker Street, Mary-le-bone. – 4. LITTLE, is the second turning on the left hand side, going from Upper Baker Street.

YORK PLACE. – 1. is in Baker Street, Portman Square. – 2. is in Upper Baker Street. – 3. is in Pentonville, near the turnpike. – 4. is in Banner Street, St. Luke’s. – 5. is in the City Road, nearly opposite Sidney Street. – 6. is in the Mile End Road, near Saville Place. – 7. is in Mile End Old Town, the first t�?urning on the left hand side, going from York Street. – 8. is in Lambeth, about a quarter of a mile on the right hand side, going from Westminster Bridge. – 9. is in the Borough Road, near the King’s Bench. – 10. is in Ossulton Street, Somers Town. – 11. is in Kent Street Road, the last turning on the left hand side going from St. George’s Church. – 12. is in Hoxton Fields, about a quarter of a mile on the left hand side going from Winkworth’s Buildings, City Road.

YORK ROW. – 1. is in James Street, Westminster. – 2. is in the Hackney Road, about a quarter of a mile from Shoreditch Church. – 3. is in the Kennington Road, near the Plough and Harrow.

YORK STREET. – 1. is in Han’s Place, Brompton. – 2. is the continuation of James Street, Westminster. – 3. is about the middle of the north side of St. James’s Square. – 4. is the continuation of Tavistock Street, Covent Garden. – 5. is the fifth turning on the left hand side going from the north east corner of Portman Square. – 6. UPPER, is the continuation of the preceding. – 7. is near the Middlesex Hospital. – 8. is in Castle Street, Turnmill Street, Clerkenwell. – 9. is the second turning on the left hand side going from Pentonville Chapel. – 10. OLD, is in Church Street, Bethnal Green, the first turning on the right hand from Shoreditch. – 11. NEW, is the second turning on the right hand from Shoreditch. – 12. is in the Commercial Road, the second turning on the right hand from Cannon Street Road. – 13. is in Clarence Street, Rotherhithe. – 14. is in High Street, Southwark, the first turning on the right hand from London Bridge. – 15. is in the London Road, the first turning on the right hand from the Elephant and Castle. – 16. LOWER, is in Bicknell’s Row, Russell Street, Rotherhithe. – 17. UPPER, is the continuation of the last.

YORK TERRACE, Kent Street Road, is near the Bricklayers’ Arms.

YORK TERRACE, Regent’s Park, is to the right and left on entering the park by York Gate, opposite Mary-le-bone New Church. It is a very handsome range of first rate dwelling houses from the designs of Mr. Nash.

YOUNG’S BUILDINGS. – 1. is in Horseshoe Alley, Finsbury. – 2. is in Rotherhithe Street, about seven eighths of a mile below the church. – 3. is in Old Street, St. Luke’s nearly opposite the church. – 4. is in Church Alley, Basinghall Street.

ZION CHAPEL and SQUARE. – [see Sion College, and Square]

ZOAR CHAPEL, Little Ayliffe Street, Goodman’s Fields, is a few yards from Red Lion Street.

ZOAR PASSAGE, Waterloo Bridge Road, is in Webber Street near the Cobourg Theatre.

ZOAR STREET, Southwark, is the second turning on the left hand side of Gravel Lane, going from Holland Street.

ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, THE GARDENS AND MUSEUM OF, are situated – the Gardens in the Regent’s Park, northward of St. Katherine’s Hospital, and at the north west side of the grounds of the master’s house of that collegiate establishment, and the Museum at No. 33, Bruton Street.

The Gardens are laid out with great taste, and the dens and cages of the various beasts and birds arranged in a manner that public curiosity may be safely gratified in examining their habits. The Museum contains many of the more tender species, and stuffed specimens. Cards to view them, at one shilling each person, can be obtained of members, and without such cards no person can be admitted.

They are under the management of the Marquess of Lansdowne, President; the Duke of Somerset, the Earl of Darnley, the Earl of Egremont, Lord Auckland, Lord Stanley, and Charles Wall Baring, Esq., Vice Presidents; twelve scientific members form the Council, Jas. Morison, Esq., Treasurer, and N. A. Vigors, Esq., Secretary.



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