Category: WC2

Covent Garden

Covent Garden comprises the area on the north side of the Strand which developed as the link between the settlements of the City of London and Westminster/Thorney Island. In medieval times the Strand was lined with large houses and palaces set in substantial gardens. The history of settlement in the area can be traced to …

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Leicester Square, WC2

Between 1630 and 1648, Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester, acquired land from Henry VIII, and built Leicester House on a site between the existing Square and Lisle Street, with a formal garden on the site of the Swiss Centre. The area south of the House became known as Leicester Fields and was laid out …

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Savoy

The Strand developed as a link between the settlements of the City of London and Westminster/Thorney Island. By the 12th century it was a street of large houses with gardens running down to the Thames. Within the Savoy Conservation Area are the sites of the Savoy Palace, Salisbury House and Worcester House. The Savoy Palace, …

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Soho

There are a number of publications providing source material for the Soho section: London Past and Present, dating from 1891 Gillian Bebbington’s London Street Names Streets of the City of Westminster from Westminster Council   Soho was originally developed as a residential area which at its height rivalled Mayfair and St James’s as a fashionable central …

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Strand, WC2

It is likely that the area was originally settled by the Saxons, forming part of the town of Lundenwic (7th to 9th centuries AD), outside the walls of the Roman City. The Strand has been a thoroughfare linking the City and Thorney Island, (later Westminster) since this time, originally running along the river bank. By …

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Trafalgar Square, WC2

Trafalgar Square was laid-out in the 1820s as a result of John Nash’s plans to remodel extensive swathes of the West End. Before the Square was laid out, the area formed the junction of Charing Cross and the Strand (the major link to the City) and included the Great Mews and Crown Stables to the …

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The Fascination of London: The Strand

THE STRAND DISTRICT. By SIR WALTER BESANT and G. E. MITTON. PART I WEST AND NORTH OF CHARING CROSS Beginning at the extreme westerly limit of St. Martin’s-in-the-Fields, on the south side of Hyde Park Corner, we find ourselves in the Green Park. This is a triangular piece of ground, which was formerly called Little …

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St. Giles-in-the-Fields, WC2

Giles (St.) in-the-Fields, at the east end of Oxford Street was originally a village separated from London and Westminster by broad fields, and its church was so designated to distinguish it from St. Giles, Cripplegate. In 1413 Sir John Oldcastle was charged by the Parliament with having 20,000 rebels apud villam et parochiam Sancti Egidii …

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Adelphi

The Adelphi area lies to the south of the Strand which developed as the link between the settlements of the City of London and Westminster/Thorney Island. By the 12th century the Strand was lined with large palaces with gardens running down to the Thames. Within the area were York House (later Buckingham House) and Durham …

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Ackermann’s

Rudolph Ackermann (born 20 April 1764 in Stollberg, Electorate of Saxony and died on 30 March 1834 in Finchley, London) was an Anglo-German bookseller, inventor, lithographer, publisher and businessman who opened a shop at 101 The Strand. The “Repository of Arts” became a most fashionable place for the upper classes of London to visit. The shops was …

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