Category: Westminster

Almonry

  This article combines two entries from the Victorian publication Curiosities of London: exhibiting the most rare and remarkable objects of interest in the metropolis; with nearly sixty years personal recollections by John Timbs, John (1801-1875). Publication date: 1867 Publisher London : J. C. Hotten ALMONRY, THE The Almonry, was named from its being the place where …

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Westminster

Westminster Abbey The origins of the area that is now the political and religious heart of Britain can be traced back to the end of the tenth century, when there was a small monastery on Thorney Island, near the site of the current Abbey. The abbey church of St. Peter was built by Edward the …

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Whitehall, SW1

Throughout the medieval period, the Palace of Whitehall grew as a complex of buildings housing the Royal Family. It was substantially extended by Henry VIII who also acquired St. James’s Park and other land for hunting, thus assuring the continuing close relationship of open space to Royal and government buildings. The eastern portion of the …

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Streets of the City of Westminster

This forms part of the “Streets of” series of posts where we have gathered the information from the conservation areas of each London borough, in this case Westminster. https://www.westminster.gov.uk/conservation-areas Adelphi Bayswater Belgravia Birdcage Walk Covent Garden Fitzrovia Harley Street Haymarket Knightsbridge Leicester Square Lisson Grove Maida Vale Marylebone Mayfair Paddington Green Pimlico Queen’s Park Estate …

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Vincent Square, SW1

    The following entry appeared in the Victorian publication London, Past and Present  by Henry Benjamin Wheatley (1838-1917) Publication date: 1891 Publisher London : John Murray, Albemarle Street Vincent Square, WESTMINSTER, built early in this century on the site of the Bear Garden in Tothill Fields, was so called after William Vincent, Dean of Westminster (d. 1816). …

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The Fascination of London: Westminster

THE FASCINATION OF LONDON WESTMINSTER By Sir WALTER BESANT and G. E. MITTON. PART I SOUTH OF VICTORIA STREET. The word Westminster used in the title does not mean that city which has its boundaries stretching from Oxford Street to the river, from the Broad Walk, Kensington Gardens, to Temple Bar. A city which embraces …

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Ackermann’s

Rudolph Ackermann (born 20 April 1764 in Stollberg, Electorate of Saxony and died on 30 March 1834 in Finchley, London) was an Anglo-German bookseller, inventor, lithographer, publisher and businessman who opened a shop at 101 The Strand. The “Repository of Arts” became a most fashionable place for the upper classes of London to visit. The shops was …

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Northumberland House

In the 16th century the Strand, which connects the City of London with the royal centre of Westminster, was lined with the mansions of some of England’s richest prelates and noblemen. Most of the grandest houses were on the southern side of the road and had gardens stretching down to the River Thames. In around …

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The execution of Charles I

King Charles’s decapitation was scheduled for Tuesday, 30 January 1649. Two of his children remained in England under the control of the Parliamentarians: Elizabeth and Henry. They were permitted to visit him on 29 January, and he bid them a tearful farewell. The following morning, he called for two shirts to prevent the cold weather …

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Victorian and Edwardian London

Made as the Victorian era morphed into the Edwardian, this is the earliest known movie footage of London.   It shows a number of scenes taking in locations such as Hyde Park Corner, Parliament Square and Charing Cross Station. We see crowds of people disembarking from a pleasure steamer at Victoria Embankment, pedestrians dodging horse-drawn …

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