Some street name derivations

A lot of the street information research on this website is academic in nature – from university research, the Survey of London, British History Online, borough conservation areas and more. Occasionally, the Hive Mind comes up trumps – these derivations come from discoveries on the Wikipedia made during 2019 which is feeding into the project.

If we find any derivations dubious here, we remove them. With that proviso, the TUM project provides them here for your enjoyment…

A-B-C D-E-F G-H-I J-K-L M-N-O P-Q-R S T-U-V W-X-Y-Z

Abbey Orchard Street, SW1 after a former orchard here attached to St Peter’s Abbey
Abbey Street, SE1 after Bermondsey Abbey, formerly located here
Abchurch Lane, EC4 after the adjacent St Mary Abchurch
Achilles Way, W1 after the nearby Wellington as Achilles statue in Hyde Park
Acton Street, WC1 after Acton Meadow which formerly occupied this site
Adam and Eve Court, W1 from the former Adam and Eve tavern near here
Adam Street, WC2 after John and Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development in the 1760s
Adam’s Court, EC2 thought to be for Sir Thomas Adams, 1st Baronet, master of the Worshipful Company of Drapers and later Lord Mayor of London
Addle Hill, EC4 from an Old English word for prince (athling) although may be from an Old English word for filth/dung, presumably descriptive
Adelaide Street, WC2 after Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen, wife of King William IV
Adeline Place, WC1 after Adeline Marie Russell, Duchess of Bedford, wife of George Russell, 10th Duke of Bedford, local landowner
Adelphi Terrace, WC2 The area was developed by the brothers John and Robert Adam, in the 1760s, and was named after adelphos, the Greek for ‘brother’
Adler Street, E1 Named for Nathan Marcus Adler Chief Rabbi of Great Britain 1845–1890
Agar Street, WC2 after George Agar, who built the street in the 1830s with John Ponsonby, Earl of Bessborough
Agnes Gardens, RM8 Agnes de Valence rented Valence House with her brother Aylmer de Valence, 2nd Earl of Pembroke in the fourteenth century
Ailsa Road, TW1 Thames Archibald Kennedy, 1st Marquess of Ailsa Bought a house called St Margaret’s near the site of the road, which later would give its name to the area
Air Street, W1 believed to be a corruption of ‘Ayres’, after Thomas Ayre, a local brewer and resident in the 17th century
Albemarle Street, W1 after Christopher Monck, 2nd Duke of Albemarle, owner of Clarendon House which stood on this site in the late 17th century
Albermarle Way, EC1 after Elizabeth, Dowager Duchess of Albermarle, who lived at Newcastle House nearby in the 18th century
Alderman’s Walk , EC2 formerly Dashwood’s Walk, for Francis Dashwood, who lived here in the 18th century; it was changed when he became an alderman
Alderney Street, SW1 this street was changed to ‘Alderley Street’ in 1879, in honour of the Stanley of Alderley family; however they were not pleased with this move and so the name was changed; prior to this it was Stanley Street, after George Stanley, local landowner
Aldersgate Street, EC2 The name Aldersgate is first recorded around 1000 meaning: ‘the gate associated with a man named Ealdrad’
Aldgate, EC3 and  Aldgate High Street, EC3 The Oldest Roman gate that lead to the East and Roman town of Colchester. Thought to be an alteration of ‘Old Gate’; others think it stems from ‘Ale Gate’ (after a local inn) or ‘All Gate’ (as it was open to all)
Aldwych, WC2 from Old English ‘Ealdwic’ meaning ‘old settlement’, given by Anglo-Saxons referring to a Danish settlement here of the 9th century
Alleyn Park, SE21 and Alleyn Road, SE21 Edward Alleyn Actor and founder of Dulwich College, near the north end of the road, in whose chapel he is now buried
Allhallows Lane, EC4 after the churches of All-Hallows-the-Great and Less, both destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666
Allsop Place, NW1 as this area was formerly Allsop’s farm, after Thomas Allsop
Alpha Road, NW8 after the Greek letter, as this was the first street to be developed in this area
Amen Court, EC4 Below the cross of Saint Paul’s where in medieval times were held processions, with rosaries calling Amen
America Square, EC3  laid out in 1767-70 by George Dance the Younger and named in honour of the American colonies
Amwell Street, EC1 The nearby New River starts at Amwell, Hertfordshire
Andre Street, E8 after Major John Andre, hanged wrongfully as a spy in 1780 in the American war of Independence, and born in Pond House, Clapton
Angel Place, SE1 formerly Angel Alley, both after a former inn here of this name
Anna Neagle Close, E7 Anna Neagle, actress and singer was born in the local area
Apothecary Street, EC4 after the nearby Worshipful Society of Apothecaries
Apple Tree Yard, SW1 after the apple trees formerly to be found here; formerly Angier Street
Apsley Way, SW1 after the adjacent Apsley House, originally built for Henry Bathurst, Lord Apsley and later the residence of the Duke of Wellington
Archer Street, W1 formerly Arch Street, presumed to be after a former archway on this site
Argyll Road, W8 George Campbell, 8th Duke of Argyll Lived at Argyll Lodge, a former house on Campden Hill
Arne Street, WC2 after the 18th century composer Thomas Arne, who was born near here
Arnold Circus, E1 named after Sir Arthur Arnold, an alderman in the late 19th century
Artillery Lane, E1 this formerly led to the Tasel Close Artillery Yard, which stood here in the 17th–18th centuries
Artillery Row, SW1 after a former nearby artillery practice ground of the 19th century
Arundel Street, WC2 after Arundel House which formerly stood on this site
Ashbridge Street, NW8 after Arthur Ashbridge, District Surveyor for Marylebone 1884–1918; formerly Exeter Street
Ashentree Court, EC4 after the ashen trees formerly located here at the Whitefriars’ monastery
Ashland Place, W1 Victorian-era alteration of its former name Burying Ground Passage, after the adjacent St Marylebone Parish Church
Ashmill Street, NW1 this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Ash Mill in Devon where they owned land
Ashmole Street, SW8 after Elias Ashmole, noted 17th century antiquarian, who lived near here
Attneave Street, EC1 thought to be named after A Attneave, local builder in the 1890s
Audley Square, W1 after Mary Davies, heiress to Hugh Audley, who married Sir Thomas Grosvenor, thereby letting the local land fall into the Grosvenors’ ownership
Austin Friars, EC2 Austin Friars was a medieval friary which stood here in the Medieval period
Ave Maria Lane, EC4 after the Hail Mary (Ave Maria), by association with the nearby St Paul’s Cathedral
Avery Farm Row, SW1 after a former farm here of this name; ‘Avery’ is a corruption of ‘Ebury’
Avery Row, W1 after Henry Avery, 18th century bricklayer who built this street over the Tyburn Brook
Aybrook Street, W1 roughly follows the path of the former Aye (or Eye Brook)
Ayles Road, UB4 one of a cluster of short roads in Yeading originally formed of social housing named after Labour politicians. Walter Ayles was Labour MP for Southall between 1945 and 1950, then for Hayes and Harlington (1950-1953)
Aylesford Street, SW1 this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family Estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one
Aylmer Road, RM8 named for Aylmer de Valence, 2nd Earl of Pembroke
Ayres Street, SE1 after Alice Ayres, local resident who died whilst saving the lives of three children in a house fire in 1885
Babmaes Street, SW1 Westminster Baptist May Courtier to King Charles II, who lived in nearby St James’s Palace
Back Hill, EC1 as it lies off (or to the ‘back’) of a main road
Baker Street, NW1 from the builders William/Edward Baker who laid the street out in the 18th century, friends and business partners of the Portman family
Bakers Hall Court, EC3 after the nearby hall of the Worshipful Company of Bakers
Balcombe Street, NW1 possibly a corruption of Batcombe, Dorset, in line with other Dorset-related street names near here
Balderton Street, W1 after local landowners the Grosvenors, who also owned land in Balderton, Cheshire
Baldwin Street, EC1 after Richard Baldwin, Treasurer at St Bartholomew’s Hospital when the street was built in 1811
Baldwins Gardens, EC1 from Richard Baldwin, gardener to Queen Elizabeth I and treasurer of the Middle Temple, who owned property in the area in the 16th century
Balfour Place, W1 after Eustace Balfour, surveyor for the Grosvenor estate 1890 – 1910
Balls Pond Road, N1 At the end of the seventeenth century, on John Ball’s land , was a pond well-stocked with fowl for the gentlemen visiting his tavern to shoot
Baltic Street East, EC1 the streets here were built by a timber merchant who named them after trade-related activities
Banbury Court, WC2 after Nicholas Knollys, 3rd Earl of Banbury, who owned a house here called Banbury House
Bank End – both after former earthen banks built to protect against the Thames [Southwark]
Bankside – both after former earthen banks built to protect against the Thames [Southwark]
Banner Street – after the Banner family, late 18th century landowners in the area [Finsbury]
Barbon Close – after 17th century property developer Nicholas Barbon [Bloomsbury]
Barge House Street – as this was the former location of the royal barges during Tudor times and after [Waterloo]
Barkham Terrace – after Edward Barkham, 8th century benefactor of the Bethlem Royal Hospital [Lambeth]
Barley Mow Passage – after a former inn here of this name, possibly by reference to alcohol, or else a corruption of the nearby St Bartholomew’s church and hospital [City of London]
Barlow Place – after either Thomas Barlow, builder and surveyor for the Grosvenor estate in the early 18th century or Arthur Balfour, politician and later Prime Minister in the early 20th century [Mayfair]
Barnard’s Inn – named after Lionel Barnard, owner of a town house (or ‘inn’) here in the mid-15th century [City of London]
Barnardo Gardens Tower Hamlets Dr Thomas John Barnardo Founded a boy’s orphanage in Stepney Causeway adjoining in 1870.
Barnardo Street Tower Hamlets Dr Thomas John Barnardo Founded a boy’s orphanage in Stepney Causeway adjoining in 1870.
Baron’s Place – after the Baron family, local landowners in the 18th century [Waterloo]
Barrett Street – after Thomas Barret, local 18th century landowner [Marylebone]
Barry Road Southwark Charles Barry Architect who designed Dulwich Park, to which the road leads to
Barter Street – after the Bloomsbury Market, which stood here in the 17th – 19th centuries [Bloomsbury]
Bartholomew Close – after St Bartholomew’s Priory, which stood here and is remembered in the names of the local hospital and two churches [City of London]
Bartholomew Lane – after the former St Bartholomew-by-the-Exchange church, demolished in 1840 [City of London]
Bartholomew Place – after St Bartholomew’s Priory, which stood here and is remembered in the names of the local hospital and two churches [City of London]
Bartholomew Square – as it was built in 1811 on land owned by St Bartholomew’s Hospital [Finsbury]
Bartholomew Street – after a former hospital located near here run by St Bartholomew’s Hospital [Southwark]
Bartlett Court – after Thomas Bartlett, court printer to Edward VI, who owned property here [City of London]
Bartlett Street – after Thomas Bartlett, court printer to Edward VI, who owned property here [City of London]
Bartletts Passage – after Thomas Bartlett, court printer to Edward VI, who owned property here [City of London]
Barton Street – after 18th century actor Barton Booth, who also attended Westminster School [Westminster]
Basinghall Avenue – thought to be after land owned here by the people of Basa or Basing (in Old Basing, Hampshire), or possibly after a mansion house of the Bassing (or Basing) family, who were prominent in the City beginning in the 13th century [City of London]
Basinghall Street – thought to be after land owned here by the people of Basa or Basing (in Old Basing, Hampshire), or possibly after a mansion house of the Bassing (or Basing) family, who were prominent in the City beginning in the 13th century [City of London]
Bassishaw Highwalk – after the Bassishaw ward in which it’s located [City of London]
Bastion Highwalk – presumably after the adjacent Roman bastion ruins [City of London]
Bastwick Street – unknown; possibly after Bastwick in Norfolk [Finsbury]
Bateman Street – after Sir James Bateman, who owned a house on this site in the 18th century [Soho]
Bateman’s Buildings – after Sir James Bateman, who owned a house on this site in the 18th century [Soho]
Bath Street – after the former Peerless Pool here, later turned into a bath; it was formerly Pest House Row, after a plague hospital built here in the Tudor era (demolished 1736) [Finsbury]
Battersea SW11 – Westminster monks from St Peters used the place for convalescent homes, the name was Patricsey Island, (St peter’s Island).
Battle Bridge Lane – after medieval landowners the abbots of Battle [Southwark]
Bayley Street – after Sir John Bayley, 1st Baronet, 18th – 19th century judge who lived nearby on Bedford Square [Bloomsbury]
Baylis Road Lambeth Lilian Baylis (1874–1937) Theatrical producer and manager of the Old Vic Theatre on the road. In the Waterloo part of Lambeth. Previously Oakley Street.
Bayswater W2 – The name is a corruption of Bayards Water, a former well that stood in Hyde Park.
Beak Street – after Thomas Beak, or Beake, who owned this land in the late 17th century; the section between Upper James Street and Lexington Street was originally called Silver Street until 1883 [Soho]
Bear Alley – thought to be after a former inn of this name [City of London]
Bear Gardens – after the sport of bear baiting formerly practised here [Southwark]
Bear Lane – after the sport of bear baiting formerly practised here [Southwark]
Bear Street – unknown, though possibly from a former pub on this street called The Bear, or possibly after Augustine Beare, a glazier who worked near here or perhaps the heraldic device of the Earls of Leicester [Soho]
Beauchamp Place Kensington and Chelsea Edward Seymour, Viscount Beauchamp Beauchamp Place, on the site of the road, was also a 16th-century mansion of the Seymour family, whose titles included Viscount Beauchamp
Beauchamp Street – from Beauchamp Court, the Warwickshire birthplace of Fulke Greville, 1st Baron Brooke, local property owner [Hatton Garden]
Beaufoy Walk – after local businessmen and philanthropists the Beaufoys [Lambeth]
Beaumont Mews – after Sir Beaumont Hotham, local leaseholder in the late 18th century [Marylebone]
Beaumont Place – after Joseph Beaumont, who built this street in 1791 [Bloomsbury]
Beaumont Street – after Sir Beaumont Hotham, local leaseholder in the late 18th century [Marylebone]
Becket Street – after Thomas Becket, murdered Archbishop of Canterbury, by association with the pilgrims who went this way to Canterbury [Southwark]
Bedale Street – after Bedale, Yorkshire; it was formerly York Street after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany but was changed in 1891 to avoid confusion with similarly named streets; further back still it was Foul Lane, a descriptive epithet [Southwark]
Bedford Avenue – after local 18th century landowners the Russell family, earls/dukes of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Bedford Court – after the 4th Earl of Bedford, who built much of the area in the 17th century [Covent Garden]
Bedford Passage – after the Bedford family, local landowners [Fitzrovia]
Bedford Place – after local 18th century landowners the Russell family, earls/dukes of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Bedford Row – from Peter Harpur of Bedford, a local landowner who laid this street out in the early 18th century [Holborn]
Bedford Square Camden Dukes of Bedford Named after the Dukes of Bedford on whose land it was built. Much of the area is still owned by the Bedford Estate.
Bedford Street Camden – after local 18th century landowners the Russell family, earls/dukes of Bedford
Bedford Way – after local 18th century landowners the Russell family, earls/dukes of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Bedfordbury – presumably after the 4th Earl of Bedford, who built much of the area in the 17th century [Covent Garden]
Bedlam Mews – after the Bethlem Royal Hospital, a notorious hospital once located here [Lambeth]
Bedser Close – for Alec Bedser, widely regarded as one of the best English cricketers of the 20th century, by association with the nearby Oval Cricket Ground [Vauxhall]
Beech Gardens – after beech trees which formerly stood here; the name is an old one, recorded as ‘Bechestrete’ in the 13th century [City of London]
Beech Street – after beech trees which formerly stood here; the name is an old one, recorded as ‘Bechestrete’ in the 13th century [City of London]
Beehive Passage – after a former tavern here of this name [City of London]
* Beeston Place, SW1 – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; the family owned land in Beeston, Cheshire [Victoria]
Belgrave Mews South – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), after their home estate of Belgrave, Cheshire; the building of the this area started under the tutelage of Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster [Belgravia]
Belgrave Mews West – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), after their home estate of Belgrave, Cheshire; the building of the this area started under the tutelage of Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster [Belgravia]
Belgrave Place – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), after their home estate of Belgrave, Cheshire; the building of the this area started under the tutelage of Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster [Belgravia]
Belgrave Square – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), after their home estate of Belgrave, Cheshire; the building of the this area started under the tutelage of Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster [Belgravia]
Belgrave Yard, – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), after their home estate of Belgrave, Cheshire; the building of the this area started under the tutelage of Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster [Belgravia]
Belgrove Street – formerly Belgrave Street, thought to be for a Warwickshire locality of this name [Bloomsbury]
Bell Inn Yard – after a former inn of this name [City of London]
Bell Street – formerly Bell Lane, it runs through the former Bell Field, possibly named for a former inn of this name on Edgware Road [Lisson Grove]
Bell Wharf Lane – unknown, possibly after a former tavern of this name; formerly Emperor’s Head Lane, after an inn here [City of London]
Bell Yard WC2 – A small lane off the Stand where once stood the Bell hostel that was owned by the Knights Templer. Nearby land being used for training for the defence of the holy lands of Palestine.
Bellot Street Greenwich Joseph René Bellot French sailor and Arctic explorer who disappeared, and has a memorial in Greenwich
Belvedere Road – after Belvedere House and gardens, opened in 1718 on the site of what is now the Royal Festival Hall [Waterloo]
Ben Jonson Place – after Ben Jonson, 17th century playwright and poet [City of London]
Bendall Mews – after Sir Talbot Hastings Bendall Baker, brother of Edward Baker, friend and business partner of the Portman family [Lisson Grove]
Bengal Court – presumably after the former British colony of Bengal [City of London]
Benjamin Street – unknown; thought to probably be for a local landowner/builder [Farringdon]
Bennet Street – after Henry Bennet, 1st Earl of Arlington, 17th century statesman and local landowner [St James’s]
Bennet’s Hill – after the adjacent St Benet’s church [City of London]
Bennett’s Yard – after Thomas Bennett, 17th century local resident [Westminster]
Bentinck Mews – after William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland, who inherited the local estate after marrying Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland in 1734 [Marylebone]
Bentinck Street – after William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland, who inherited the local estate after marrying Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland in 1734 [Marylebone]
Berkeley Mews – after Henry William Berkeley, who inherited the local Portman estate via his mother [Marylebone]
Berkeley Square – Berkeley House formerly stood here, home of John Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley of Stratton in the late 17th century. The Square was made in 1698 from the gardens of Berkley House, the home of Lord Berkley of Stratton, whose name lives on also in Stratton Street off the Square. Berkley House survived until 1733 [Mayfair]
Berkeley Street – Berkeley House formerly stood here, home of John Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley of Stratton in the late 17th century [Mayfair]
Bermondsey Square – understood to mean ‘Beornmund’s island’; but, while Beornmund represents an Old English personal name, identifying an individual once associated with the place, the element -ey represents Old English eg, for island, piece of firm land in a fen, or simply a place by a stream or river. Thus Bermondsey need not have been an island as such in the Anglo-Saxon period, and is as likely to have been a higher, drier spot in an otherwise marshy area. [Southwark]
Bermondsey Street SE1 – Towards the southern end of the Street, once stood a Priory or Abbey of St. Saviours called Bermond’s Eye in Southwark, founded by Alwin Childe, in the year 1081. The Street as well as the area became known as Bermondsey.
Bernard Street – after Sir Thomas Bernard, 3rd Baronet, 18th – 19th century social reformer who held several high level positions at the nearby Foundling Hospital [Bloomsbury]
Berners Mews – after local 17th – 18th century landowners the Berners family [Fitzrovia]
Berners Place – after local 17th – 18th century landowners the Berners family [Fitzrovia]
Berners Street W1 – Josias Berners bought a small estate close to Hanway Street, his ancestor William Berners between 1750 – 1763 built what is today Berners Street.
Berry Place – after Thomas Berry, local early 19th century landowner [Clerkenwell]
Berry Street – after Thomas Berry, local early 19th century landowner [Clerkenwell]
Berwick Street – after James FitzJames, 1st Duke of Berwick, son of James II, as the local landowner James Pollett was a Roman Catholic [Soho]
Bessborough Gardens – after John Ponsonby, 5th Earl of Bessborough and later Baron Duncannon of Bessborough [Westminster]
Bessborough Place – after John Ponsonby, 5th Earl of Bessborough and later Baron Duncannon of Bessborough [Victoria]
Bessborough Street – after John Ponsonby, 5th Earl of Bessborough and later Baron Duncannon of Bessborough [Victoria]
Betterton Street – after Thomas Betterton, prominent actor of the 17th century [Covent Garden]
Bevin Way – after prominent Labour politician Ernest Bevin [Clerkenwell]
Bevis Marks EC4 – Named after a large house and gardens belonging to the Abbots of Bury in Suffolk with the house being called Buries Markes, Corrupted to Bevis Marks. The site given to Bury St Edmunds Abbey in the 1100s; mark is thought to note a boundary here [City of London]
Bidborough Street – after Bidborough in Kent, home county of local 16th century landowner Andrew Judd [Bloomsbury]
Billiter Street EC3 – Once home to a medieval Bell Foundry, Billiter from the ancient French word for ‘Bell Founder.’
Bingham Place – after Bingham in Nottinghamshire, where local landowners the dukes of Portland owned property [Marylebone]
Binney Street – after Reverend Thomas Binney, local 19th century minister; formerly called Bird Street [Mayfair]
Birchin Lane – though suggested to come from the Old English ‘beord-ceorfere’ (bear carver i.e. a barbers); it has had several variation on this name in the past, including Berchervere, Blomfield Street – after Charles James Blomfield, Bishop of London 1828–1856 [City of London]
Bird Street – after Thomas Bird, local 18th century bricklayer [Marylebone]
Birdcage Walk – after the aviaries that were formerly part of St James’s Park [Westminster]
Birkenhead Street – after Birkenhead in Cheshire; formerly Liverpool Street [Bloomsbury]
Bishop’s Court – formerly led to the palace of the Bishop of Chichester, built in the 13th century [Holborn]
Bishopsgate – after one of the City gates that formerly stood here, thought to commemorate Saint Earconwald, Bishop of London in the 7th century [City of London]
Bishopsgate Arcade and Bishopsgate Churchyard – after one of the City gates that formerly stood here, thought to commemorate Saint Earconwald, Bishop of London in the 7th century [City of London]
Bishopsgate Churchyard – after one of the City gates that formerly stood here, thought to commemorate Saint Earconwald, Bishop of London in the 7th century [City of London]
Black Horse Court – after a former inn here of this name [Southwark]
Black Prince Road SE1 – Edward III gave his son Edward the Black Prince 1330-76 the manor of Vauxhall and Kennington.
Black Swan Yard – after a former inn here of this name [Southwark]
Blackburne’s Mews – after William Blackburne, local resident in the early 18th century [Mayfair]
Blackfriars Bridge – after the former Dominican (or Black friars, after their robes) friary that stood here 1276–1538 [City of London]
Blackfriars Court – after the former Dominican (or Black friars, after their robes) friary that stood here 1276–1538 [City of London]
Blackfriars Lane – after the former Dominican (or Black friars, after their robes) friary that stood here 1276–1538 [City of London]
Blackfriars Passage – after the former Dominican (or Black friars, after their robes) friary that stood here 1276–1538 [City of London]
Blackfriars Road – named after Blackfriars Bridge in 1769/70; it was formerly Great Surrey Street, reflecting the traditional county it is in [Waterloo]
Blackfriars Underpass – after the former Dominican (or Black friars, after their robes) friary that stood here 1276–1538 [City of London]
Blandford Square – after Blandford Forum, Dorset, where the local Portman family had a seat [Lisson Grove]
Blandford Street – after Blandford Forum, Dorset, where the local Portman family had a seat [Marylebone]
Bleeding Heart Yard – thought to be from the sign of a former pub in this area called the Bleeding Heart [Hatton Garden]
Blenheim Street – after Blenheim Palace, owned by John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, 17th – 18th century general [Mayfair]
Blondin Avenue Ealing Charles Blondin Tightrope walker and acrobat, who lived and died at nearby Niagara House in Northfields. Commemorates Niagara Falls where Blondin performed his most famous tightrope walk in 1859.
Bloomberg Arcade – after its owners/developers Bloomberg L.P. [City of London]
Bloomburg Street – after Dr Blomberg, Domestic Chaplain to George IV [Westminster]
Bloomfield Place – John Newson, who built the adjacent Bloomfield Flats, named them for his wife’s maiden name [Mayfair]
Bloomfield Terrace – alteration of ‘Blomfield’, after Charles James Blomfield, Bishop of London 1828 – 1856, who consecrated the nearby Church of St Barnabas, Pimlico [Belgravia]
Bloomsbury Court – the name is first noted in 1201, when William de Blemond, a Norman landowner, acquired the land. The name Bloomsbury is a development from Blemondisberi – the bury, or manor, of Blemond. [Bloomsbury]
Bloomsbury Place – the name is first noted in 1201, when William de Blemond, a Norman landowner, acquired the land. The name Bloomsbury is a development from Blemondisberi – the bury, or manor, of Blemond. [Bloomsbury]
Bloomsbury Square – the name is first noted in 1201, when William de Blemond, a Norman landowner, acquired the land. The name Bloomsbury is a development from Blemondisberi – the bury, or manor, of Blemond. [Bloomsbury]
Bloomsbury Street WC1 – The name Bloomsbury is derived from a William Blemund, who was Lord of the Manor at the time of Henry III. After passing through several hands it came into the possession of Henry Wriothesley, Earl of Southampton, the Patron of Shakespeare. It passed to his granddaughter, Lady Rachel, who by her marriage to William, Lord Russell, brought it into the Bedford Familly, who have supplied much of the nomenclature of the district.
Bloomsbury Way – the name is first noted in 1201, when William de Blemond, a Norman landowner, acquired the land. The name Bloomsbury is a development from Blemondisberi – the bury, or manor, of Blemond. [Bloomsbury]
Blore Court – unknown; possibly after 19th century architect Edward Blore, who built the nearby St Luke’s House (demolished 1936, now Kemp House) [Soho]
Blue Ball Yard – after the former 18th century Blew Ball tavern here [St James’s]Bob Marley Way, Brixton Bob Marley Jamaican singer-songwriter and musician, one of the most widely known performers of reggae music.
Boldero Place – as this area was formerly home to the warehouses of the firm Spencer, Turner & Boldero [Lisson Grove]
Bolingbroke Grove Wandsworth Henry St John, 1st Viscount St John (also known as Viscount Bolingbroke) Owner of the land on which the road was later built, and buried in St Mary’s Church, Battersea
Bolsover Street – after local landowners the dukes of Portland, Barons of Bolsover [Fitzrovia]
Bolt Court – thought to be after a former tavern called the Bolt-in-Tun [City of London]
Bolton Street – after Charles Powlett, Duke of Bolton, who owned this land when the street was built in 1699 [Mayfair]
Bond Court – after a 17th-century property developer of this name [City of London]
Bond Street Westminster Sir Thomas Bond Property developer of Bond Street, Dover Street and Albemarle Street, from 1683
Bondfield: MP, trades unionist and women’s rights activist. Hardie: First Labour MP Morrison: Transport Secretary (1929-1931), Home Secretary (1940-1945) and Deputy Prime Minister (1945-1951).
Bondway – after the late 18th century developers of this street John and Sarah Bond [Vauxhall]
Booth’s Place – after local 18th century landowner Joseph Booth [Fitzrovia]
Borough High Street – after the ancient Borough of Southwark [Southwark]
Borough Road – after the ancient Borough of Southwark [Southwark]
Borough Square – after the ancient Borough of Southwark [Southwark]
Boscobel Place – after a former pub here called the Royal Oak, by association with Charles II who hid from Parliamentary forces in the Royal Oak at Boscobel House [Belgravia]
Boscobel Street – after a former inn here called The Royal Oak, by association with Charles II who hid from Parliamentary forces in the Royal Oak at Boscobel House [Lisson Grove]
Boston Place – the land here was formerly called Boston Field [Lisson Grove]
Boswell Court – after local 17th bricklayer Edward Boswell [Bloomsbury]
Boswell Street – after local 17th bricklayer Edward Boswell [Bloomsbury]
Botolph Alley – after the St Botolph Billingsgate church which stood near here, destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666 [City of London]
Botolph Lane – after the St Botolph Billingsgate church which stood near here, destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666 [City of London]
Bourchier Street – after Rev. Basil Bourchier, rector of St Anne’s Church, Soho in the early 1930s; prior to renaming in 1937 it was Little Dean Street, and further back it has been known as Milk Alley and Hedge Lane [Soho]
Bourdon Place – after the former Bourdon House, home of the Bourdon/Burden family in the early 18th century [Mayfair]
Bourdon Street – after the former Bourdon House, home of the Bourdon/Burden family in the early 18th century [Mayfair]
Bourlet Close – after Bourlet’s, fine art agents formerly based here [Fitzrovia]
Bourne Street – as this used to run beside the river Westbourne [Belgravia]
Boutflower Road Wandsworth Henry Boutflower Verdon First vicar-designate of the then new St Mark’s Church, past which the road runs. He died, young, in 1879, seven years before the construction of the road.
Bouverie Street City of London Earls of Radnor The Pleydell-Bouveries, Earls of Radnor, were landlords of this area.
Bow Churchyard – after the adjacent St Mary-le-Bow church [City of London]
Bow Lane – after the adjacent St Mary-le-Bow church; it was formerly known as Hosier Lane (after the local stocking making trade), and prior to that Cordewanere Street (meaning ‘leather-workers’) [City of London]
Bow Street – after its curving bow-like shape [Covent Garden]
Bowden Street – after John Bowden, who bought this land from the Cleavers in 1815 [Lambeth]
Bowen Road, Harrow Part of a cluster of streets named after teachers and headmasters of Harrow School: Edward Ernest Bowen was author of the Harrow school song.
Bowling Green Lane – after the former Bowling Green House on this site, demolished 1933. The house had been built over an old bowling green which dated back to the 18th century [Clerkenwell]
Bowling Green Place – after an 18th-century bowling green located here [Southwark]
Bowling Green Street – this land was formerly a bowling green leased to the owners of the nearby Horns Tavern [Vauxhall]
Boyfield Street – after Josiah Boyfield, local landowner and clothmaker [Southwark]
Boyle Street – after Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington, local landowner in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Brabant Court – thought to be after the Dutch/Belgian province of this name, though possibly a corruption of a personal name (prior to the 18th century it was known as Braben Court, and before that Brackley Street – after the Earls of Bridgewater, also called the Viscounts Brackley, who owned a house near here [City of London]
Braidwood Passage – presumably after 19th century fireman James Braidwood [City of London]
Braidwood Street – after 19th century fireman James Braidwood [Southwark]
Bread Street – after the bakery trade that formerly took place here [City of London]
Bream’s Buildings – thought to be named for its 18th century builder [City of London]
Bressenden Place – this street was built in 1962, replacing a small line of shops called Bressenden Row; the origins of the name is unknown [Westminster]
Breton Highwalk – presumably after the 16th–17th century poet Nicholas Breton [City of London]
Brewer Street – after the breweries that existed here in the 17th century; the eastern-most section was formerly known as Little Pulteney Street until 1937 [Soho]
Brewer’s Hall Gardens – after the adjacent Worshipful Company of Brewers hall [City of London]
Brewer’s Green – after William Brewer, 17th century gardener here [Westminster]
Brewhouse Yard – after a former brewery on this site [Clerkenwell]
Brick Court – as this was home to the first set of brick buildings in the area [City of London]
Brick Street – this area was formerly a set of fields used for digging brick-earth [Mayfair]
Bricklayer’s Arms – after a former coaching inn here of this name [Southwark]
Bride Court – after the adjacent St Bride’s Church [City of London]
Bride Lane – after the adjacent St Bride’s Church [City of London]
Bridewell Place – after the adjacent St Bride’s Church and a well that was formerly located here in the early Middle Ages; the name was later given to Bridewell Palace (demolished in the 1860s [City of London]
Bridford Mews – after Bridford in Devon, by association with the nearby Devonshire Street [Marylebone]
Bridge Place – after the Eccleston Bridge that stood here [Victoria]
Bridge Street – presumably as it leads to Westminster Bridge [Westminster]
Bridgewater Highwalk – after the Earls of Bridgewater, also called the Viscounts Brackley, who owned a house near here [City of London]
Bridgewater Square – after the Earls of Bridgewater, also called the Viscounts Brackley, who owned a house near here [City of London]
Bridgewater Street – after the Earls of Bridgewater, also called the Viscounts Brackley, who owned a house near here [City of London]
Bridgeway Street – by connection with the Barons Ossulton peerage; formerly Bridgewater Street [Somers Town]
Bridle Lane – thought to be after Abraham Bridle, a carpenter who leased land here in the last 17th century [Soho]
Briset Street – after Jordan de Briset, local 12th century landowner who gave land to the Order of St John for their headquarters here [Farringdon]
Britannia Street – built in the 1760s and named to suggest patriotism [Clerkenwell]
Britton Street EC1 – Named after Thomas Britten a 17th century coal-man who had a great opera voice who performed with Mr Handel in nearby Jerusalem Passage and created the first musical concerts in England. A prominent patron of the arts, he lived nearby in the 17th – 18th century; it was formerly known as Red Lion Street, after a local inn [Farringdon]
Broad Court – a descriptive name [Covent Garden]
Broad Sanctuary, Little Sanctuary and The Sanctuary – after the former nearby St Peter’s Sanctuary which offered refuge for those accused of crime [Westminster]
Broadbent Street – after William Broadbent, physician to the royal family in the Victorian and Edwardian period, who lived nearby [Mayfair]
Broadgate – developed in the late 1980s, named for the former Broad Street station on this site and the adjacent Bishopsgate [City of London]
Broadgate Circle – developed in the late 1980s, named for the former Broad Street station on this site and the adjacent Bishopsgate [City of London]
Broadley Street – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Broadley Wood, Dorset where they owned land; it was formerly Earl Street [Lisson Grove]
Broadley Terrace – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Broadley Wood, Dorset where they owned land; it was formerly Earl Street [Lisson Grove]
Broadstone Place – after Broadstone, Dorset, where local landowners the dukes of Portland owned property [Marylebone]
Broadwall – after a former earthen dyke located here, marking the western boundary of the parish of Paris Gardens/Christchurch [Waterloo]
Broadway – self-explanatory; it was formerly Broad Place [Westminster]
Broadwick Street – originally Broad Street, it was renamed in 1936 to avoid confusion with other Broad Streets; the eastern-most section between Berwick Street and Wardour Street was formerly called Edward Street, after Edward Wardour [Soho]
Brockham Street – unknown; formerly Church Street [Southwark]
Broken Wharf – this wharf fell into disrepair owing to a property dispute in the 14th century [City of London]
Brook Drive – after a former brook (stream) here that formed the boundary between local parishes [Lambeth]
Brook Gate – Brook Street marks the path of the former Tyburn Brook [Mayfair]
Brook Street – Brook Street marks the path of the former Tyburn Brook [Mayfair]
Brook’s Mews – Brook Street marks the path of the former Tyburn Brook [Mayfair]
Brooke Street – after Fulke Greville, 1st Baron Brooke, who owned a house near here in the 17th century [Hatton Garden]
Brooke’s Court – after Fulke Greville, 1st Baron Brooke, who owned a house near here in the 17th century [Hatton Garden]
Brooke’s Market – after Fulke Greville, 1st Baron Brooke, who owned a house near here in the 17th century [Hatton Garden]
Brovens Court) [City of London]
Brown Hart Gardens – this was formerly two streets prior to 1936 – Brown Street, after 18th century local bricklayer John Brown, and Hart Street, probably after a local inn or resident [Mayfair]
Brown Street – named after Mr Brown, local 19th century builder [Marylebone]
Browning Close Westminster Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning Poets who lived in Little Venice, near the site of the road.
Browning Mews – after the poet Robert Browning, who married local resident Elizabeth Barret [Marylebone]
Brownlow Mews – after William Brownlow, local 17th century landowner (further to the south, hence Brownlow Street in Holborn); his daughter Elizabeth married into the Doughty family, who owned land in this area [Bloomsbury]
Brownlow Street – after William Brownlow, who built this street in the 17th century; his family had held land in the area since the 16th century [Holborn]
Brunel Road Southwark Marc Isambard Brunel The road is situated near the south end of Thames Tunnel, which the engineer Brunel built.
Brunswick Mews – after the Brunswick Chapel, formerly located near here on Upper Berkeley Street [Marylebone]
Brunswick Place – after Caroline of Brunswick, wife of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Brunswick Square – after the German city of Braunschweig (Brunswick), by connection with the reigning House of Hanover [Bloomsbury]
Brushfield Street – after Thomas Brushfield, Victorian-era representative for this area at the Metropolitan Board of Works; the western-most section, here forming the boundary with Tower Hamlets, was formerly called Union Street [City of London]
Bruton Lane – after Bruton, Somerset, where John Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley of Stratton owned land [Mayfair]
Bruton Place – after Bruton, Somerset, where John Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley of Stratton owned land [Mayfair]
Bruton Street – after Bruton, Somerset, where John Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley of Stratton owned land [Mayfair]
Bryanston Mews East – after Bryanston in Dorset, where local landowners the dukes of Portland owned property [Marylebone]
Bryanston Mews West – after Bryanston in Dorset, where local landowners the dukes of Portland owned property [Marylebone]
Bryanston Place – after Bryanston in Dorset, where local landowners the dukes of Portland owned property [Marylebone]
Bryanston Square – after Bryanston in Dorset, where local landowners the dukes of Portland owned property [Marylebone]
Bryanston Street – after Bryanston in Dorset, where local landowners the dukes of Portland owned property [Marylebone]
Brydges Place – after Giles Brydges, 3rd Baron Chandos, father-in-law of the 4th Earl of Bedford who built much of the area in the 17th century [Covent Garden]
Buckingham Arcade – after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, 17th century courtier, who acquired York House which formerly stood on this site; his son sold the area to developers on condition that his father and titles were commemorated on the new streets [Strand]
Buckingham Gate – named by association with Buckingham Palace, originally built for John Sheffield, Duke of Buckingham [Westminster]
Buckingham Mews – named by association with Buckingham Palace, originally built for John Sheffield, Duke of Buckingham [Westminster]
Buckingham Palace Road – by association with Buckingham Palace, originally built for John Sheffield, Duke of Buckingham [Belgravia]
Buckingham Place – named by association with Buckingham Palace, originally built for John Sheffield, Duke of Buckingham [Westminster]
Buckingham Street – after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, 17th century courtier, who acquired York House which formerly stood on this site; his son sold the area to developers on condition that his father and titles were commemorated on the new streets [Strand]
Bucklersbury – after the Buckerel/Bucherel family who owned land here in the 1100s [City of London]
Bucklersbury Passage – after the Buckerel/Bucherel family who owned land here in the 1100s [City of London]
Bucknall Street – after either Arabella Bucknall (or Bucknell), mother of John Hanmer, 1st Baron Hanmer who owned this land in the 19th century, or Ralph Bucknall, local 17th – 18th century vestryman [St Giles]
Budge Row – formerly home to the drapery trade; a ‘budge/boge’ was a type of lamb’s wool [City of London]
Bulinga Street – after Bulinga Fen, formerly here in Saxon times [Westminster]
Bull Inn Court – formerly led to the Bull Inn which stood on Strand [Covent Garden]
Bull’s Head Passage – thought to be after an inn or shop of this name [City of London]
Bulstrode Place – after local landowners the Bentinck family, who also owned land at Bulstrode Park in Buckinghamshire [Marylebone]
Bulstrode Street – after local landowners the Bentinck family, who also owned land at Bulstrode Park in Buckinghamshire [Marylebone]
Bunhill Row – from the adjacent Bunhill Fields cemetery, from ‘bone hill’ [Finsbury]
Bunhouse Place – after a former shop here selling Chelsea buns [Belgravia]
Bunyan Court – after the author John Bunyan, who attended the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate church [City of London]
Burbage Close – after Richard Burbage, noted Shakespearian actor [Southwark]
Burgon Street – after Dean Burgon of St Paul’s Cathedral; prior to 1885 it was called New Street [City of London]
Burleigh Street – site of a house belonging to William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, Secretary of State to Elizabeth I [Covent Garden]
Burlington Arcade – after the local Burlington estate, property of the earls of Burlington [Mayfair]
Burlington Gardens – after the local Burlington estate, property of the earls of Burlington [Mayfair]
Burlington Gardens Hounslow Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington Builder of Chiswick House, in its park adjacent to the road.
Burlington Lane Hounslow Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington Builder of Chiswick House, in its park adjacent to the road.
Burlington Road Hounslow Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington Builder of Chiswick House, in its park adjacent to the road.
Burne Street – after one Mr Burne, who purchased land here in 1792 [Lisson Grove]
Burrows Mews – after the nearby Burrows Buildings, built 1770 [Waterloo]
Bursar Street – after William Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester in the 15th century; he left an endowment of local property to the College [Southwark]
Burton Place – after the 18th century architect James Burton, who worked on the nearby Foundling Hospital and Bedford estate [Bloomsbury]
Burton Street – after the 18th century architect James Burton, who worked on the nearby Foundling Hospital and Bedford estate [Bloomsbury]
Bury Court – after a former house on this site given to Bury St Edmunds Abbey in the 1100s [City of London]
Bury Place – a shortening of ‘Bloomsbury’ [Bloomsbury]
Bury Street – after a former house on this site given to Bury St Edmunds Abbey in the 1100s [City of London]
Bury Street – after Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of Saint Albans and Baron Jermyn of St Edmunsbury (Bury St Edmunds), 17th century politician and local landowner [St James’s]
Butler Place – after Nicholas Butler, who built (now demolished) almshouses here in 1675 [Westminster]
Butler Road, Harrow Part of a cluster of streets named after teachers and headmasters of school: Montagu Butler was at Harrow between 1859 and 1885.
Byng Place – after George Byng, 4th Viscount Torrington, father-in-law to local landowner John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Byward Street EC3 – From a byword, password spoken to Beefeaters from the nearby Tower of London.
Cabbell Street – after George Cabbell, local landowner in the 1790s [Marylebone]
Cade Road Greenwich Jack Cade Leader of a popular revolt against the government in 1450, which took place on Blackheath, near where the road now stands.
Cadogan Lane Kensington and Chelsea Earl Cadogan The road is built on land acquired by Charles Cadogan, 2nd Baron Cadogan on his marriage to Sir Hans Sloane’s daughter. He started building on this land in the 1750s.
Cadogan Place Kensington and Chelsea Earl Cadogan The road is built on land acquired by Charles Cadogan, 2nd Baron Cadogan on his marriage to Sir Hans Sloane’s daughter. He started building on this land in the 1750s.
Cadogan Square Kensington and Chelsea Earl Cadogan The road is built on land acquired by Charles Cadogan, 2nd Baron Cadogan on his marriage to Sir Hans Sloane’s daughter.
Cahill Street – thought to be named after a trustee of the Peabody Donation Fund, who redeveloped this former slum area in the 1880s [Finsbury]
Calthorpe Street – after Henry Gough-Calthorpe, 1st Baron Calthorpe, local 18th century landowner, and his descendants who developed the local street plan [Clerkenwell]
Calvert’s Buildings – after Felix Calvert, 18th century brewer here [Southwark]
Cambridge Circus – after Prince George, 2nd Duke of Cambridge, who formally opened the new development of Charing Cross Road in 1887 [St Gile’s]
Cambridge Gate – after Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Cambridge Gate Mews – after Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Cambridge Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Victoria]
Cambridge Terrace – after Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Cambridge Terrace Mews – after Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Camden High Street Camden Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden Owner of the land on which the road and much of the surviving development was built in 1791.
Camden Road Camden Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden Owner of the land on which the road and much of the surviving development was built in 1791. The forerunner districts, e.g. St Pancras are little-used.
Camden Street Camden Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden Owner of the land on which the road and much of the surviving development was built in 1791. The forerunner districts, e.g. St Pancras are little-used.
Camden Town Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden Owner of the land on which the road and much of the surviving development was built in 1791. The forerunner districts, e.g. St Pancras are little-used.
Camomile Street – after the camomile formerly grown here for medicine [City of London]
Candover Street – after Candover in Hampshire, where local landowners dukes of Portland owned land [Fitzrovia]
Canning Road, Croydon Group of five roads built on the site of the East India Company Military Seminary by the British Land Company, and named after prominent figures in the history of British India. Canning: statesman and Governor-General of India during the Indian Rebellion of 1857.
Cannon Street – a contraction of the 14th century ‘Candlewick Street’, meaning a street where candle-makers were based [City of London]
Canon Alley – presumably in reference to the adjacent St Paul’s Cathedral [City of London]
Canon Row – after the canons of St Stephen’s, the chapel in the former Palace of Westminster, founded in the 12th century [Westminster]
Canvey Street – after Canvey Island in Essex; it was formerly Essex Street [Southwark]
Capel Court – after William Capel, Lord Mayor of London in the early 16th century [City of London]
Capener’s Close – after John Capener,19th century builder who owned a carpentry/undertakers business here [Belgravia]
Capland Street – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Capland, Somerset where they owned land [Lisson Grove]
Capper Street – after the Capper farmer, tenant farmers on this land in the 17th – 18th centuries [Bloomsbury]
Carburton Street – after Carburton, Nottinghamshire, where local landowners dukes of Portland owned land [Fitzrovia]
Cardinal Bourne Street – after Francis Bourne, Bishop of Southwark in the late 19th century [Southwark]
Cardinal Cap Alley – after a former inn or brothel here, called either the Cardinal’s Cap or Hat [Southwark]
Cardinal Walk – presumably by association with the adjacent Westminster Cathedral [Westminster]
Cardington Street – after the Dukes of Bedford, who also owned land at Cardington, Bedfordshire [Regent’s Park]
Carey Place – after William Carey, headmaster of Westminster School 1803-14 [Westminster]
Carey Street – after Nicholas Carey, who lived in this area [14] or Sir George Carey [Holborn]
Carlisle Place – after George William Frederick Howard, 7th Earl of Carlisle, Viscount Morpeth, who was chiefly responsible for local development in the 1850s [Westminster]
Carlisle Street – after Carlisle House on Soho Square, owned by the earls of Carlisle [Soho]
Carlos Place – after Carlos I of Portugal; it was formerly Charles Street but was renamed in 1886 to avoid confusion with other streets of this name [Mayfair]
Carlton Gardens SW1 – Designed by John Nash and built in 1830. at Number 2 Lord Kitchener would turn up for work each day in full field marshal’s uniform. It was here one day that he devised his First World War poster, with the famous slogan, ‘Your Country Needs You.’
Carlton House Terrace – after the former Carlton House, built here in 1709 for Henry Boyle, 1st Baron Carleton [St James’s]
Carlton Street – after the former Carlton House, built here in 1709 for Henry Boyle, 1st Baron Carleton [St James’s]
Carmelite Street – after the Carmelite order (known as the White friars), who were granted land here by Edward I [City of London]
Carnaby Street – after Karnaby House, owned by 17th century property developer Richard Tyler; the meaning of the ‘Karnaby’ is unknown [Soho]
Carrington Street – after 18th century local landowner Nathan Carrington [Mayfair]
Carroun Road – after the former Carroun, or Caron, House which stood here [Vauxhall]
Carter Court – after the cartering trade that formerly took place here, or possibly also after someone with this name [City of London]
Carter Lane – after the cartering trade that formerly took place here, or possibly also after someone with this name [City of London]
Carteret Street – after Sir Edward de Carteret, local 17th century landowner [Westminster]
* Carting Lane – thought to be from the carts that brought good to and from the wharf formerly located here; until the 1830s it was called Dirty Lane [Strand]
Carthusian Street – after the Carthusian monks who lived near here in the Middle Ages [City of London]
Cartwright Gardens Camden Major John Cartwright Formerly Burton Crescent after its developer, James Burton. Renamed after social reformer who campaigned for universal suffrage, vote by ballot, annual parliaments and the abolition of slavery. He lived and died at No. 37, and a 21st-century erected sculpture nearby
Castle Baynard Street – after Castle Baynard which formerly stood here [City of London]
Castle Court – after a former inn of this name [City of London]
Castle Lane – after a former inn of this name that stood here [Westminster]
Castle Yard – after a former inn here of this name [Southwark]
Castlereagh Street – after Robert Stewart, 2nd Marquess of Londonderry, Lord Castlereagh, prominent politician of the 17th – 18th centuries [Marylebone]
Cathedral Street – after the adjacent Southwark Cathedral [Southwark]
Catherine Griffiths Court – after Catherine Griffiths (1885-1988), a suffragette, founder of the Finsbury Women’s Committee in the 1920s, and mayor of Finsbury in 1960 [Clerkenwell]
Catherine Street – after Catherine of Braganza, queen of Charles II, reigning monarch when the street was laid out [Covent Garden]
Catherine Wheel Alley – after a former inn of this name, which was named for the Catherine wheel on the coat of arms of the Worshipful Company of Turners [City of London]
Catherine Wheel Yard – from the name of an inn that stood on this site until it burnt down in 1895 [St James’s]
Cato Street – named by landowner John Harcourt, in allusion to the Roman Cato; it was changed for a period to Horace Street (after the Roman poet) owing to the notoriety of the Cato Street conspiracy, but the original name was restored [Marylebone]
Catton Street – after the 18th century painter Charles Catton who lived nearby [Holborn]
Causton Street – after Thomas Causton, Canon at Westminster [Westminster]
Cavendish Court – after the Cavendish family, Dukes of Devonshire, who owed a house near here in the 1600s [City of London]
Cavendish Mews North – after Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, father of Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer, who married Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, landowner [Marylebone]
Cavendish Mews South – after Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, father of Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer, who married Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, landowner [Marylebone]
Cavendish Place – after Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, father of Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer, who married Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, landowner [Marylebone]
Cavendish Road, Hounslow Dukes of Devonshire Owners of Chiswick House, on whose large estate the roads were built. Re-built in 1811 by the 6th Duke)
Cavendish Square Westminster Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Mortimer née Henrietta Cavendish Holles The square and adjoining streets were named after the various relatives of Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, and of his son, Edward. Henrietta was Edward’s wife
Cavendish Street – after Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, father of Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer, who married Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, landowner [Marylebone]
Caxton Street Westminster William Caxton English merchant, diplomat, writer and responsible for the introduction of the printing press to England; the first such press was established in 1476 in Westminster, close to the present road.
Cayton Place – renamed, after the village in Yorkshire, from New Street in 1805, to avoid confusion with other streets of this name [Finsbury]
Cayton Street – renamed, after the village in Yorkshire, from New Street in 1805, to avoid confusion with other streets of this name [Finsbury]
Cecil Court – after the Cecil family, earls of Salisbury, who owned this land from the 17th century on [Covent Garden]
Centaur Street – after the mythical creatures, by association with nearby Hercules Street [Lambeth]
Central Street – named thus in 1861, as it lay in the centre of St Luke’s Parish [Finsbury]
Chadwell Street – after Chadwell Spring in Amwell, Hertfordshire, source of the nearby New River, or possibly William Chadwell Mylne [Clerkenwell]
Chadwick Street – after Hannah Chadwick, who left money to local schools in her will [Westminster]
Chagford Street – after the stannary town Chagford, Devon; this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate and Edward Portman, 1st Viscount Portman was Lord Warden of the Stannaries 1865–88 [Lisson Grove]
Chancery Lane – the former site of Edward III’s office of the Master of the Rolls of Chancery [Holborn]
Chancery Lane EC1 – Called New Street and running down from the north of Holborn, with the residence of important officers of state, renamed Chancellor’s Lane, becoming known as Chancery Lane. The former site of Edward III’s office of the Master of the Rolls of Chancery [City of London]
Chandos Crescent Harrow James Brydges, 1st Duke of Chandos Lived at Canons Park, to the north of the road buried in the parish at St Lawrence’s church, Whitchurch, Little Stanmore.
Chandos Place – after Giles Brydges, 3rd Baron Chandos, father-in-law of the 4th Earl of Bedford who built much of the area in the 17th century [Covent Garden]
Chandos Street – after the Duke of Chandos, who built a mansion nearby in the 1710s [Marylebone]
Change Alley – after the nearby Royal Exchange [City of London]
Chapel Place – after the nearby St Peter, Vere Street church, formerly a chapel of ease [Marylebone]
Chapel Street – after a former chapel on this site, opened 1772, closed in the 1850s [Marylebone]
Chapel Street – after a former Lock chapel here adjacent to a hospital, both now demolished [Belgravia]
Chapone Place – after famed Georgian essayist Hester Chapone, who lived nearby on Dean Street; formerly Dean’s Yard [Soho]
Chapter Street – as the land belonged to the Dean and Chapter of Westminster Abbey [Westminster]
Charing Cross – after the Eleanor cross at Charing, from the Old English word cierring, referring to a bend in the River Thames [Westminster]
Charing Cross Road – built 1887, and named as it led to the cross at Charing, from the Old English word cierring, referring to a bend in the River Thames [Charing Cross]
Charles II Street – named after Charles II, king when this street was built [St James’s]
Charles Street – after a Charles in the family of John Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley of Stratton [Mayfair]
Charlie Chaplin Walk – after Charlie Chaplin, famous 20th century comedian and actor, who was born in South London [Waterloo]
Charlotte Mews, Charlotte Place and Charlotte Street – after Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, wife of King George III [Fitzrovia]
Charlotte of Wales [Clerkenwell]
Charlotte Street Camden Queen Charlotte Married to King George III in 1761; the street was formed in 1763
Charlwood Place – after Henry Wise, local 18th century landowner and gardener to William III, who owned land in Charlwood, Surrey [Victoria]
Charlwood Street – after Henry Wise, local 18th century landowner and gardener to William III, who owned land in Charlwood, Surrey [Victoria]
Charrington Street – as this land was formerly owned by the Worshipful Company of Brewers, and named for the Charrington Brewery [Somers Town]
Charterhouse Buildings – Anglicisation of Chartreuse, from Grande Chartreuse, head monastery of the Carthusians in France; a nearby abbey was founded by monks of this order in 1371 [Farringdon]
Charterhouse Mews – Anglicisation of Chartreuse, from Grande Chartreuse, head monastery of the Carthusians in France; a nearby abbey was founded by monks of this order in 1371 [Farringdon]
Charterhouse Square – Anglicisation of Chartreuse, from Grande Chartreuse, head monastery of the Carthusians in France; a nearby abbey was founded by monks of this order in 1371 [City of London]
Charterhouse Street – Anglicisation of Chartreuse, from Grande Chartreuse, head monastery of the Carthusians in France; a nearby abbey was founded by monks of this order in 1371 [City of London]
Chatham Avenue Bromley William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham Lived and died at Hayes Place, a former house on whose estate the road was built
Cheapside – from ‘chepe’, an Old English word meaning ‘market’; this was the western end of a market that stretched over the Eastcheap [City of London]
Cheapside Passage – from ‘chepe’, an Old English word meaning ‘market’; this was the western end of a market that stretched over the Eastcheap [City of London]
Chelsea Bridge Road – as it leads to Chelsea Bridge opened 1858 [Belgravia]
Chenies Mews – after local landowners the dukes of Bedford, also titled Barons Russell, of Chenies [Bloomsbury]
Chenies Place – after local landowners the dukes of Bedford, also titled Barons Russell, of Chenies [Somers Town]
Chenies Street WC1 – Takes its name from the Buckinghamshire village where since 1556, the Russell family have been buried.
Chequer Street – after the former Chequers tavern here [Finsbury]
Chesham Close – after the Lowndes family, former local landowners, whose seat was at Chesham, Buckinghamshire [Belgravia]
Chesham Place – after the Lowndes family, former local landowners, whose seat was at Chesham, Buckinghamshire [Belgravia]
Chesham Street – after the Lowndes family, former local landowners, whose seat was at Chesham, Buckinghamshire [Belgravia]
Cheshire Court – after the adjacent Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub [City of London]
Chester Close – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Chester [Belgravia]
Chester Close North – after the Prince Regent (George IV), also Earl of Chester [Regent’s Park]
Chester Close South – after the Prince Regent (George IV), also Earl of Chester [Regent’s Park]
Chester Cottages – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Chester [Belgravia]
Chester Court – after the Prince Regent (George IV), also Earl of Chester [Regent’s Park]
Chester Gate – after the Prince Regent (George IV), also Earl of Chester [Regent’s Park]
Chester Mews – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Chester [Belgravia]
Chester Place – after the Prince Regent (George IV), also Earl of Chester [Regent’s Park]
Chester Road – after the Prince Regent (George IV), also Earl of Chester [Regent’s Park]
Chester Row – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Chester [Belgravia]
Chester Square Mews – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Chester [Belgravia]
* Chester Street – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Chester [Belgravia]
Chester Terrace Camden Earl of Chester One of the titles of George IV before he became king in 1820. The terrace was constructed in 1825.
Chester Way – as it formed part of the manor of Kennington, which belonged to the Duchy of Cornwall (the Prince of Wales also being Earl of Chester) [Lambeth]
Chesterfield Gardens – after Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield, who owned a mansion nearby in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Chesterfield Hill – after Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield, who owned a mansion nearby in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Chesterfield Street – after Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield, who owned a mansion nearby in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Chesterfield Walk Greenwich Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield Named after a house called Chesterfield House, where the author lived.
Chesterfield Walk Westminster Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield Named after a house called Chesterfield House, where the author lived.
Cheyne Walk Kensington and Chelsea William Cheyne, 2nd Viscount Newhaven Owned the manor of Chelsea until 1712.
Chichele Road, Willesden Henry Chichele 15th-century Archbishop of Canterbury who founded All Souls College, Oxford who owned much of Willesden.
Chichele Street, Lambeth Henry Chichele 15th-century Archbishop of Canterbury who founded All Souls College, Oxford. Lambeth Palace adjoins the street, the arch-episcopal palace in London.
Chichester Rents – formerly a street of rented houses leading to the palace of Ralph Harris, Bishop of Chichester in the 13th century [Holborn]
Chichester Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Victoria]
Chiltern Street – after the nearby Marylebone station, from where train to the Chiltern Hills of Buckinghamshire depart [Marylebone]
Ching Court – after the Comyn Ching Co., a former ironmongers near here [Covent Garden]
Chiswell Street – either for old term meaning ‘stony/gravelly earth’, or a corruption of ‘Choice Well’, denoting a source of clean water [City of London]
Chitty Street – after the Victorian-era local resident and law writer Joseph Chitty [Fitzrovia]
Church Cloisters – after the adjacent St Mary-at-Hill church; Church Passage till 1938 [City of London]
Church Court – after the adjacent Temple Church [City of London]
Church Entry – after the former St Ann Blackfriars church which burned down in the 1666 fire [City of London]
Church Place – after the adjacent St James’s Church, Piccadilly; formerly Church Passage [St James’s]
Church Street – after the nearby St Mary on Paddington Green Church [Lisson Grove]
Churchill Gardens Road – this post-war estate was named in honour of Prime Minister Winston Churchill [Victoria]
Churchway – as this formed part of old pathway to St Pancras Old Church [Somers Town]
Churchyard Row – after the former St Mary’s church located here, destroyed in the Blitz [Lambeth]
Churton Place – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family Estate; they owned land in Churton, Cheshire [Victoria]
Churton Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family Estate; they owned land in Churton, Cheshire [Victoria]
Circus Mews – the street to which it adjoins, Enford Street, was formerly supposed to lead to a circus (Junction), however it was never built [Marylebone]
Circus Place – after the adjacent Finsbury Circus [City of London]
City Road – as it connects Islington to the City of London [Finsbury]
Clapham Road – as it leads to the south-west London area of this name [Vauxhall]
Clare Market – former site of a butcher’s market on land owned by the John Holles, Earl of Clare who lived nearby [Holborn]
Claremont Close – after the nearby Claremont Chapel on Pentonville Road (now the Crafts Council), which was named after Claremont, Surrey, the country house of the recently deceased Princess Clarges Mews – after William (or Thomas) Clarges, local landowner in the 17th century [Mayfair]
Claremont Square – after the nearby Claremont Chapel on Pentonville Road (now the Crafts Council), which was named after Claremont, Surrey, the country house of the recently deceased Princess Charlotte of Wales [Clerkenwell]
Clarence Street Kingston upon Thames Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen Opened the street in 1828, when she was Duchess of Clarence [25]
Clarendon Grove – by connection with the Barons Ossulton peerage [Somers Town]
Clarendon Road Kensington and Chelsea George Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon Lord Privy Seal at the time the road was built. [26]
Clarendon Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family Estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Victoria]
Clarges Street – after William (or Thomas) Clarges, local landowner in the 17th century [Mayfair]
Clarges Street W1 – Sir Thomas Clarges, an important politician who built this street that was named after him.
Clarke’s Mews – after William Clarke, local 18th century landowner [Marylebone]
Claverton Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; they owned land in Claverton, Cheshire [Victoria]
Claylands Place – after the former brick clay fields located here prior to 1800 [Vauxhall]
Claylands Road – after the former brick clay fields located here prior to 1800 [Vauxhall]
Clayton Street – after the Clayton family, who leased much of this land from the Duchy of Cornwall from the 1660s on [Vauxhall]
Cleaver Square – after Mary Cleaver, who developed this area in the 1700s [Lambeth]
Cleaver Street – after Mary Cleaver, who developed this area in the 1700s [Lambeth]
Clement’s Inn, Clement’s Inn Passage and Clement’s Lane – after the nearby St Clement Danes church [Holborn]
Clements Lane – after the adjacent St Clement’s, Eastcheap church [City of London]
Clenston Mews – after Winterborne Clenston in Dorset, where the local Portman family owned land [Marylebone]
Clerkenwell Close – from a local well (‘the clerk’s well), which gave its name to the area [Clerkenwell]
Clerkenwell Green – from a local well (‘the clerk’s well), which gave its name to the area [Clerkenwell]
Clerkenwell Road – from a local well (‘the clerk’s well), which gave its name to the area [Clerkenwell]
Clerkenwell Road – from a local well (‘the clerk’s well), which gave its name to the area to this district [Hatton Garden]
Clerkenwell Road – from a local well (‘the clerk’s well’), which gave its name to the area and to this district [Holborn]
Cleveland Mews – after Barbara Palmer, 1st Duchess of Cleveland, founder of the house of the Fitzroy family, local landowners [Fitzrovia]
Cleveland Place and Cleveland Row – after Cleveland House (now Bridgwater House), named for Barbara Palmer, 1st Duchess of Cleveland who lived there in the late 17th century [St James’s]
Cleveland Street – after Barbara Palmer, 1st Duchess of Cleveland, founder of the house of the Fitzroy family, local landowners [Fitzrovia]
Clifford Street – after Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington]], also Baron Clifford, after his ancestor Elizabeth Clifford [Mayfair]
Clifford’s Inn Passage – after an inn (townhouse) given to Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford by Edward II [City of London]
Clifton Court – possibly after Clifton, Bristol [Lisson Grove]
Clink Street – after The Clink prison formerly located here [Southwark]
Clipstone Mews – after Clipstone, Nottinghamshire, where local landowners dukes of Portland owned land [Fitzrovia]
Clipstone Street – after Clipstone, Nottinghamshire, where local landowners dukes of Portland owned land [Fitzrovia]
Cliveden Place – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned Cliveden House in Buckinghamshire in the late 19th century [Belgravia]
Cloak Lane – unknown, though possibly from ‘cloaca’, an old word for a sewer; prior to the mid-17th century it was Horseshoebridge Street, after a bridge that stood here over the Walbrook [City of London]
Cloth Court – after a long-running cloth fair that was formerly held here [City of London]
Cloth Fair EC1 – The narrow street named Cloth Fair, stands where the original Bartholomew Fair was held in medieval times, and runs by the side of the ancient church of St Bartholomew the Great, where some of the buildings have survived the Great Fire of London 1666, numbers 41 and 42, was built between 1597 and 1614.
Cloth Street – after a long-running cloth fair that was formerly held here [City of London]
Clothier Street – after the former clothes market that operated here [City of London]
Cluny Place – after Bermondsey Abbey, initially established as a Cluniac order [Southwark]
Clyde Road, Croydon Group of five roads built on the site of the East India Company Military Seminary by the British Land Company, and named after prominent figures in the history of British India.
Coach and Horses Yard – after the Burlington Arms pub here, formerly the Coach and Horses [Mayfair]
Cobourg Street – after Leopold I of Belgium off Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, husband of Princess Charlotte of Wales, George IV’s daughter [Regent’s Park]
Cock Hill – unknown, possibly from an old inn of this name [City of London]
Cock Lane – thought to be after either cock rearing or cock fighting that formerly occurred here [City of London]
Cockpit Steps – after a former cock fighting ring on this site [Westminster]
Cockpit Yard – site of a cock fighting yard in the 18th century [Bloomsbury]
Cockspur Court – unknown, though possibly after the cock fighting that formerly occurred here, cocks often having spurs attached to their feet during fights [St James’s]
Cockspur Street – unknown, though possibly after the cock fighting that formerly occurred here, cocks often having spurs attached to their feet during fights [Soho]
Coin Street – thought possibly after a former mint located here in the time of Henry VIII; it was formerly Prince’s Street until 1893, after the Prince Regent (later George IV) [Waterloo]
Cold Bath Square EC1 – So called from a well of cold water that stood here in fields. In 1794 a house of correction was built on these fields.
Coleman Street – possibly after a church of this name or a personal name, [136] [137] or literally after the coalmen who formerly lived in this area in the Middle Ages [City of London]
Coleman Street Buildings – possibly after a church of this name or a personal name, [136] [137] or literally after the coalmen who formerly lived in this area in the Middle Ages [City of London]
College Hill – after the adjacent St Michael Paternoster Royal, which was created as a collegiate church by Richard Whittington in 1419; College Street was formerly Paternoster Street (meaning rosary makers]] and College Hill was Royal Street (a corruption of La Réole, France, where local wine merchants hailed from) [City of London]
College Street – after the adjacent St Michael Paternoster Royal, which was created as a collegiate church by Richard Whittington in 1419; College Street was formerly Paternoster Street (meaning rosary makers]] and College Hill was Royal Street (a corruption of La Réole, France, where local wine merchants hailed from) [City of London]
Collinson Street – after the Collinson family, noted for their active interest in local and church affairs in the 19th century [Southwark]
Collinson Walk – after the Collinson family, noted for their active interest in local and church affairs in the 19th century [Southwark]
Colombo Street – after Alexander Colombo, 19th century bailiff of the local manor of Paris Gardens [Waterloo]
Colonnade – this was formerly a Georgian-era colonnade of shops [Bloomsbury]
Colville Place – after its 18th century builder John Colvill (or Colville) [Fitzrovia]
Compter Passage – presumably after the former Wood Street Compter [City of London]
Compton Passage – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton [Clerkenwell]
Compton Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton [Clerkenwell]
Concert Hall Approach – as it leads to the Royal Festival Hall, built 1951 [Waterloo]
Conduit Court – thought to be named after Leonard Cunditt/Conduit, an innholder in Long Acre in the 1600s [Covent Garden]
Conduit Street – after a former water conduit here leading to the City and owned by the Corporation of London from the 15th century [Mayfair]
Connaught Square Westminster Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh Also known as the Earl of Connaught, built up in his lifetime.
Cons Street SE1 – Emma Cons was the founder of the Royal Victoria Coffee Music Hall in the 1880s, that later became known as the Old Vic.
Constitution Hill – obtained its name in the 17th century from King Charles II’s habit of taking constitutional walks there. In Strype’s Map, 1720, it is marked Road to Kensington. In John Smith’s map of 1724, it is called Constitution Hill [Westminster]
Conway Mews and Conway Street – after Isabella FitzRoy, Duchess of Grafton, Baroness Conway, part of the local landowning Fitzroy family [Fitzrovia]
Cooper’s Row – after an 18th-century property owner of this name; prior to this it was Woodruffe Lane, also thought to be after a property owner [City of London]
Copperfield Street – after the novel David Copperfield by Charles Dickens, by association with Dickens Square [Southwark]
Copthall Avenue – after a former ‘copt hall’ (crested hall) that stood here [City of London]
Copthall Buildings – after a former ‘copt hall’ (crested hall) that stood here [City of London]
Copthall Close – after a former ‘copt hall’ (crested hall) that stood here [City of London]
Coptic Street – named in 1894 after a recent acquisition of Coptic manuscripts by the British Museum; before this it was Duke Street, after the dukes of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Coram Street – after Thomas Coram, 18th century founder of the Foundling Hospital which was formerly near here [Bloomsbury]
Corbet Court – after a local 17th century property developer [City of London]
Cork Street – after Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington]], also 4th Earl of Cork [Mayfair]
Cork Street Mews – after Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington]], also 4th Earl of Cork [Mayfair]
Corlett Street – probably after Hubert C Corlette, Victorian-era artist and local resident [Lisson Grove]
Cornhill – thought to be after the corn formerly grown or sold here [City of London]
Cornwall Road – as it formed part of the manor of Kennington, which belonged to the Duchy of Cornwall; it was Green Lane prior to 1815 [Waterloo]
Corporation Row – after the former New Corporation Work House, built here in the 1660s; prior to this it was known as Cut Throat Lane [Clerkenwell]
Cosmo Place – after Cosmo George Gordon, 3rd Duke of Gordon, grandfather of Lady Georgiana, wife of local landowner John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Cosser Street – after Cosser & Sons, a 19th-century family timber business located near here [Lambeth]
Cosway Street – after Richard Cosway, Regency-era painter [Lisson Grove]
Cottington Street – after Francis Cottington, 1st Baron Cottington, 17th century diplomat and politician, who leased land near here; formerly Mansion House Row [Lambeth]
Counter Street – corruption of compter (small prison), as the borough’s compter formerly stood here [Southwark]
Cousin Lane – after either Joanna or William Cousin, the first a local landowner, the latter a 14th-century sheriff [City of London]
Covent Garden – corruption of ‘Convent Garden’, after the gardens belonging to Abbey of St Peter, Westminster in the 1200s [Covent Garden]
Coventry Street WC2 – Henry Coventry, King Charles the II ‘s secretary of state brought a house (Shaver’s Hall) in 1672 that he named Coventry house, the street was later named after him
Cowcross Street – this street was path for cattle being taken to nearby Smithfield market [Farringdon]
Cowley Street – after 18th century actor Barton Booth, who also owned land at Cowley in Middlesex [Westminster]
Cowper’s Court – after the Cowper family, local landowners [City of London]
Craig’s Court – after Joseph Craig, who built this Court in the 1600s [Westminster]
Cramer Street – after the violinist Wilhelm Cramer, who lived near here [Marylebone]
Cranbourn Alley – built in the 1670s and named after local landowner the Earl of Salisbury, Viscount Cranbourn (or Cranbourne) after the town in Dorset [Soho]
Cranbourn Street – built in the 1670s and named after local landowner the Earl of Salisbury, Viscount Cranbourn (or Cranbourne) after the town in Dorset [Covent Garden]
Crane Court – formerly Two Crane Court, possibly after a coat of arms of one of the local landowning families [City of London]
Crane Court, Fleet Street EC4 – At the entrance to this court stood the Two Crane Inn Tavern.
Cranleigh Street – by connection with the Barons Ossulton peerage; formerly Johnson Street [Somers Town]
Craven Hill Westminster Earls of Craven Owned the land on which the road was later built.
Craven Passage and Craven Street – after William Craven, 3rd Baron Craven, who owned the land when the street was built in the 1730s [Strand]
Craven Road Westminster Earls of Craven Owned the land on which the road was later built.
Crawford Mews, Crawford Place and Crawford Street – after Tarrant Crawford in Dorset, where the local Portman family owned land [Marylebone]
Crawford Passage – after Peter Crawford, landlord of a former pub here called the Pickled Egg; the passage was formerly Pickled Egg Walk [Clerkenwell]
Creechurch Lane – after the former Holy Trinity Priory, Aldgate near here; it was also named Christ Church, later corrupted to ‘Creechurch’, and later also given to St Katharine Cree church [City of London]
Creechurch Place – after the former Holy Trinity Priory, Aldgate near here; it was also named Christ Church, later corrupted to ‘Creechurch’, and later also given to St Katharine Cree church [City of London]
Creed Court – by association with the nearby St Paul’s Cathedral [City of London]
Creed Lane – by association with the nearby St Paul’s Cathedral [City of London]
Crescent – thought to be first crescent-shaped street in London [City of London]
Crescent Row – descriptive, after its shape [Finsbury]
Crestfield Street – unknown, formerly Chesterfield Street [Bloomsbury]
Cricketers Court – presumably by connection with the nearby Oval Cricket Ground [Lambeth]
Cripplegate Street – after the former Cripplegate that stood here, referring either to a crepel (Latin for ‘covered way’) or the association with the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate church (St Giles is the patron saint of cripples) [City of London]
Cromer Street – formerly Lucas Street, which had gained notoriety due to the landlord of a local inn (the Lucas Arms) being involved with the Gordon Riots; it was changed to the neutral Cromer, for the town in Norfolk [Bloomsbury]
Cromwell Highwalk – presumably after Oliver Cromwell, who was married in the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate Church in 1620 [City of London]
Cromwell Place – presumably after Oliver Cromwell, who was married in the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate Church in 1620 [City of London]
Cromwell Road SW7 Richard Cromwell Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland who once owned a house there, son of English military and political leader Oliver Cromwell. Once known as Cromwell Lane.
Crosby Square – after Crosby House, built for Sir John Crosby, 15th century merchant and politician [City of London]
Cross Keys Close – after the former Cross Keys tavern here, named for local 18th century street developer Philip Keys [Marylebone]
Cross Keys Square – after a house or inn called Cross Keys that stood here in Tudor times [City of London]
Cross Lane – descriptive; it was formerly Fowle Lane (literally ‘foul’) [City of London]
Crosswall – descriptive, as it crosses the boundary of the city wall [City of London]
Crown Court – from the former Crown Inn, which stood on the corner with Russell Street [Covent Garden]
Crown Office Row – after the Clerks of the Crown Office formerly located here [City of London]
Crown Passage – thought to be after a former tavern of this name [St James’s]
Crowndale Road – as this land was formerly owned by Dukes of Bedford, who also owned land in Crowndale, Devon [Somers Town]
Crucifix Lane – after the former Cross of Bermondsey located here; it was destroyed in 1559 [Southwark]
Cruickshank Street – after George Cruikshank, 19th century illustrator who lived on nearby Amwell Street [Clerkenwell]
Crutched Friars – after the Crutched Friars, a religious order who had a friary here in the early Middle Ages which was dissolved by Henry VIII [City of London]
Cubitt Street – after the prominent 19th century builder Thomas Cubitt, who built this street; it was formerly called Arthur Street [Clerkenwell]
Cubitt’s Yard – presumably after either William Cubitt, Lord Mayor of London (1860–1862) or Thomas Cubitt, 19th century street developer [Covent Garden]
Cullum Street – after either Sir John Cullum, 17th century sheriff who owned land here, or Thomas Cullum [City of London]
Culross Street – thought to be after Culross in Fife; prior to 1899 it was Northrop Street, after a Welsh property owned by the Grosvenor family [Mayfair]
Cumberland Gardens – unknown; prior to 1929 this was Cumberland Terrace [Clerkenwell]
Cumberland Gate – after Prince William, Duke of Cumberland, brother of George III; it was formerly Tyburn Gate, after the Tyburn Brook [Mayfair]
Cumberland Market Camden Duke of Cumberland Younger brother of King George IV at the time of the terrace’s construction, 1826.
Cumberland Place – after Ernest Augustus, King of Hanover, Duke of Cumberland, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Cumberland Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family state; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Victoria]
Cumberland Terrace Camden Duke of Cumberland Younger brother of King George IV at the time of the terrace’s construction, 1826.
Cumberland Terrace Mews – after Ernest Augustus, King of Hanover, Duke of Cumberland, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Cunard Place – after the Cunard Line headquarters, formerly located here [City of London]
Cundy Street – after Thomas Cundy and his son, surveyors to local landowners the Grosvenors in the 19th century [Belgravia]
Cunningham Place – this land was formerly owned by Harrow School; this street was named for Reverend John William Cunningham, a governor of the school in the 1810s [Lisson Grove]
Cureton Street – after William Cureton, noted Orientalist and canon of Westminster 1849-64 [Westminster]
Cursitor Street – after the Cursitors’ office, established here in the 16th century [City of London]
Curzon Gate – after Nathaniel Curzon (and his family), local landowner in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Curzon Square – after Nathaniel Curzon (and his family), local landowner in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Curzon Street Westminster George Howe, 3rd Viscount Howe Curzon was a family name; George Howe was the ground landlord
Custom House Walk – after the adjacent Custom House [City of London]
Cutler Street – after the Worshipful Company of Cutlers, who owned land here [City of London]
Cutlers Gardens Arcade – after the Worshipful Company of Cutlers, who owned land here [City of London]
Cypress Place – by association with the nearby Maple Street [Fitzrovia]
Cyrus Street – possibly after the Persian King of this name; prior to 1880 it was called King Street [Clerkenwell]
Czar Street Lewisham Czar Peter the Great of Russia Lived at Sayes Court, a former house nearby, in 1698 while studying shipbuilding at Deptford.

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